Nyboder, Copenhagen

5 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Nyboder.
    Nyboder.
    by cachaseiro
  • St. Paulsgade, Nyboder
    St. Paulsgade, Nyboder
    by antistar
  • St. Paulsgade, Nyboder
    St. Paulsgade, Nyboder
    by antistar
  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Nyboder.

    by cachaseiro Written Oct 17, 2013
    Nyboder.

    Nyboder is a collection of little lowscale yellow houses that were build between 1631 and 1641 for sailors when the danish navy expanded heavily.
    It's in my opinion one of the most charming parts of Copenhagen and the houses are still owned by the danish army eventhough it's not all navy people who live in them these days.
    I personally love the fact that they are protected but also used for living in and not just standing as empty museums.
    It's a nice and quiet part of the city with a lot of history to it.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    Nyboder

    by ValbyDK Updated Apr 1, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Nyboder
    2 more images

    Nyboder is situated close to Østerport Station, and is a very beautiful and idyllic area in Copenhagen. Nyboder was built as a residential area for the people of the Royal Danish Navy – commissioned by King Christian IV. The first building was finished in 1631 and 10 years later a total of 20 houses - with more than 200 apartments - were built.

    Today, the buildings still house enlisted personnel of the army, air force and navy, but the priority of enlisted personnel was stopped in 2006. The apartments are now very popular among people living in Copenhagen – despite they will have to bend their heads several times a day because of the low door-frames.

    Two houses in the oldest part of Nyboder is now home for the small Nyboder Museum. Here you can learn about life in Nyboder and experience the humble and modest living conditions at the start of the 20th century. The museum is located at Skt. Pauls Gade 24, Copenhagen K and is open on Sundays from 11am to 2pm.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    St. Paul's Church

    by antistar Written Jan 2, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    St. Paul's Church, Copenhagen
    1 more image

    In Nyboder one of Copenhagen's newest churches stands. It was built in the 19th century during a flurry of civic activity, as the city rushed to provide for its exploding population. This church was unusual in that it served an existing community, not a new one - the naval community of Nyboder. Its functional red brick architecture still manages to look stern and the church fiercely imposes itself on the small, saffron yellow houses below.

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Nyboder

    by antistar Written Jan 2, 2012
    St. Paulsgade, Nyboder
    2 more images

    Nyboder (or Newhouses) holds a special place in Danish culture. Built as new homes for the burgeoning Danish navy, the houses and district have remained long after the area was given over to the general public. The distinctive colour of the houses has given rise to the term "Nyborg yellow". The area has appeared in works by many famous Danish authors, including Hans Christian Anderson.

    The houses are beautiful, as is the church of St. Paul's that towers over them. The first houses were built in 1631. Most of the remaining buildings are from the 18th century, except the oldest row of houses on St. Paulsgade. St. Paul's Church itself is the latest addition, being built in 1877.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Classic73's Profile Photo

    A bit of history...

    by Classic73 Updated Sep 14, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When visiting Copenhagen, you should take the time to take a stroll by the Nyboder neighbourhood, the old housing for the sailors of the danish navy. Built under the reign of Christian 4th, at a time when the size of the navy was increased dramatically, these row houses served as the homes of the non-ranking sailors and their families from 1631 and onwards, all the way up to today. Originally situated outside the city, the location of the neighbourhood changed to being on inside (although on the outskirts of) the city centre during their construction, as the walls around Copenhagen were moved outward to accomodate the increased population.

    Today, the neighbourhood is a green oasis in the city centre, and even though the buildings are very low-ceilinged, small and cramped, these yellow houses are very sought-after, although a connection to the navy is still a must...

    Make your way to Krokodillegade, and look up at number 15. Above and to the left of the wall you'll see a livid reminder of the british bombardment of Copenhagen in 1807; a canonball still stuck in the wall!

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Copenhagen

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

83 travelers online now

Comments

View all Copenhagen hotels