Parks, Statues & Memorials, Tallinn

8 Reviews

Know about this? Rate It!

hide
  • Grandaughter photographing flowers
    Grandaughter photographing flowers
    by grandmaR
  • 'Centre of Tallinn'
    'Centre of Tallinn'
    by leics
  • Statue in its wooded circle
    Statue in its wooded circle
    by leics
  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Tammsaare Park

    by grandmaR Written Jul 26, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kissing sculpture
    4 more images

    My granddaughter went up into this park which was near the Viru Gate and took some photos of some of the statues there. It is a park in Tallinn City Center which has a statue dedicated to a famous Estonian writer Anton H. Tammsaare.

    The park was established in 1948 on a former bombsite, and was originally called Stalin Square. After Stalin's death it was called 16th October Park, but in 1978 when the statue to Tammsaare was erected it was unofficially renamed for him. The park is used by many Tallinners to go in and out of the Old Town. Tammsaare’s expression, a combination of reflectiveness, scepticism and resignation, is deeply Estonian.

    It is between Pärnu maantee and Estonia puiestee.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Budget Travel
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Monument to Dostojevski

    by grandmaR Updated Jul 26, 2009
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    4 more images

    Under construction

    Dostojevski is a great name is connected with Tallinn. Between 1830 and 1840, Mikhail Dostoyevsky lived in Uus Street in the old part of Tallinn, being employed at the Reval Engineer Commando. His brother, the Russian writer Fyodor Dostoyevsky, frequently visited Tallinn at that time.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Look down......

    by leics Written Aug 1, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    'Centre of Tallinn'

    In Raekjoka Plats there is a stone slab.

    This is supposed to be the 'Centre of Tallinn', and the text surrounding it says that. Apparently you can see the five main spires of the city from here, but I didn't try.

    If you stand in front of the Town Hall cafe and then look across the square in front of you you should be able to spot the stone in amongst the other cobbles. It's a bit faded now, but still visible.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    Lindamagi

    by leics Written Jul 21, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Statue in its wooded circle
    1 more image

    Lindamagi (Linda's Hill) is a little woody bump just outside the Old Town Walls (near Kiek-in-die-Kok).

    In Estonian legend, Linda was the wife of Kalev, who founded Tallinn. When Kalev died, she buildt the hill now known as Toompea as his memorial.

    There is a rather nice statue of Linda, surrounded by a circle of ancient trees.

    The statue was used during the Soviet era as a place of remembrance for those sent to the work camps (in Siberia). A plaque has now been added to the statue: 'To remember the ones who were taken away'.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    The Boy of Bronze

    by leics Updated Jul 20, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Boy of Bronze
    1 more image

    This monument is at the side of the Estonia Theatre & Concert Hall, on the outskirts of the Old Town.

    It is a monument to the struggle for Estonian independence which occurred immediately after the First World War. General Laidoner, the Estonian Commander-in-Chief, had to call upon schoolboys to save the city when it was threatened by the Bolsheviks (1918-1919). The sculpture is dedicated to those boys who fought (and fell).

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • leics's Profile Photo

    The Broken Bridge

    by leics Written Jul 20, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Broken bridge

    To the right of Fat Margaret's Tower, by the Great Coastal Gate, is a small 'park': well, it is really just a grassy area.

    In it you will find the 'Broken Bridge', a monument to the ferry disaster on 1994. The car ferry 'Estonia', en route from Tallinn to Stockholm, went down with the loss of 852 lives.

    I found this monument more moving than I expected: modern monuments rarely have much effect on me, so perhaps it was the gloom and chill of such a wet day which added atmosphere.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Monument to Michael Park

    by Airpunk Written Jun 22, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Monument to Michael Park
    1 more image

    I didn’t know anything about Michael Park until I saw this sculpture dedicated to him. A shiny metal cube with the name of a man who died at the age of 39. It was later that I found out who Michael Park was. Mr. Park was a british rallye driver, co-pilot of estonian pilot Markko Märtin. Michael Park died on September 18th 2005 after crashing into a tree during the Wales rallye. Märtin left the car without injuries and retired afterwards from the World Rallye series. Michael Park was a popular driver in Estonia and it is said that he adopted the country as a second home.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • King_Golo's Profile Photo

    The hidden letter

    by King_Golo Updated Apr 19, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The hidden letter (Photo by I. Merkel)

    If you pay a lot of attention to the ground of Raekoja Plats (well, why not???), you might find some bricks which look like the letter "L". There is an interesting story behind this letter: Centuries ago, a preacher raped a virgin girl in Tallinn. Shocked about what he had done, he turned himself in to the authorities and was sentenced to death. His wish was to be executed on Raekoja Plats to show everyone what incredible misdeed he had committed. A cross marked this place, but nowadays only an "L" is left...
    Before you start searching for too long, I give you a small hint: Look in front of Raekoja Apteek!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Tallinn

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

80 travelers online now

Comments

View all Tallinn hotels