Fun things to do in Narva

  • The babushkas, hard at work
    The babushkas, hard at work
    by Art68
  • Babushka! Daite mne vadu puhjahlusta!
    Babushka! Daite mne vadu puhjahlusta!
    by Art68
  • Closer up
    Closer up
    by Art68

Most Viewed Things to Do in Narva

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    Orthodox Church of the Resurrection.

    by Askla Updated Dec 9, 2012

    The initiation to build the church took place on August 5, 1890, during the official meeting of the two emperors Alexander III and Wilhelm II. The inauguration was on November 17, 1896. The influences from Byzantine architechture are clearly visible.

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    Narva Museum.

    by Askla Updated Dec 9, 2012

    Narva Museum is situated in the Hermann Castle.
    Opening hours:
    during summer 10.00 - 18.00 every day
    during winter 10.00 - 18.00 Wed - Sunday, 10.00 - 17.00 Mon + Tuesday.

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    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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    The Hermann Castle.

    by Askla Updated Dec 9, 2012

    The castle, or fortress, was built by the Danes in the 13th century and mentioned 1277 for the first time. But from the beginning it was built of wood. In the first half of the 14th century it was rebuilt and developed into a stone fortress due to the many conflicts with the Russians. (The Russian fortress Ivangorod at the other side of the Narva River was completed in 1492.)In 1347, the King of Denmark sold Northern Estonia to the Livonian Order who reconstructed the castle into a convent building with the massive main tower called Hermann. They also built a town wall at the lenght of ~1 km, with four gates and at least seven towers, but it was all pulled down in 1777.
    The whole complex was badly damaged during the WW II but renovation started alreay at the beginning of the 50s, and it was reopened in 1986. The castle nowadays hosts the Narva Museum.

    The Ivangorod fortress in the background. These bells stands at the entrance to the museum.
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Tourist Map.

    by Askla Updated Nov 24, 2012

    Not a tip on "What to do" but on "What to use to be able to do what you want to do".
    Here is a link to a clickable map with text in English, Estonian and Russian.

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    The Border.

    by Askla Updated Nov 24, 2012

    This is perhaps not a tip of what to do but it might be interesting to know that the Narva River is on the Estonian side of the border as you can see in the second picture which is just a close up of the first one. That is the pole marking the border.
    The fortress in the river bend is the Russian opponent to Narva's Hermann Castle, called Ivangorod Castle.

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    Kuramae well

    by Art68 Updated Jul 23, 2007

    The spring runs through the monastery grounds and is said to have blessed qualities. Men and women take turns to enter a shed positioned over the spring, where they strip down naked, then go into the water and immerse themselves 3 times. It is COLD! But very refreshing. You can't go there and not try it! (in summer only!)

    Still dazed after jumping into freezing water! From a distance The spring running under the dunking shed!

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    Kuramae / Pühtitsa Monastery

    by Art68 Updated Jul 23, 2007

    Worth seeing if you are in the Narva area though actually it's nearer Jõhvi) and are in a car. Maybe 20 km from Narva. An Orthodox monastery with over 150 nuns living within. The monastery is open to the public. Very well maintained. Apparently the stream which runs through it witnessed a divine revelation and a small orthodox church was built on the site. In the late 19th century a convent was built.

    Closer up The monastery Orthodox Nun Entrance to monastery
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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  • IneXisTenZ's Profile Photo

    Russian border

    by IneXisTenZ Written May 3, 2006

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    Much of what gives Narva its unique character is the fact that it sits on the eastern border of the EU, hardly more than a stone's throw from the Russian Federation. From the riverbank to the south, you can also see the ancient castles of Narva and Ivangorod staring each other down, giving you a very real sense of a historic frontier.Just a warning.. don't swimm in the river.. probably you will catch a bullet from russian snipers...

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    Narva town hall

    by IneXisTenZ Written May 3, 2006

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    During Estonia's period of Swedish rule (16th and 17th Centuries) Narva activity was centred around a beautiful collection of tile-roofed houses in what's now called Old Town. Sadly, the area was almost totally during World War II and later filled in with russian apartments.

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    Narva castle and museum

    by IneXisTenZ Written May 3, 2006

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    Indeed the primary Narva tourist attraction, is the 14th-century castle that sits on the banks of the Narva river. Built by the Danes in the 1370s, it was continually improved during its subsequent Swedish and Russian years of ownership. The 51m Long Hermann Tower,was rised, over and over because they wanted to see into Invogorod castle,so the russians build a wall over and over to prevent enemies watch into their castle.World War Two inflicted heavy damage on the castle, but restoration work in the Soviet period has brought it back to its original glory. Nowadays the wide castle courtyard serves as a kind of town common where cultural events are held. The castle buildings house the Narva Museum, which provides extensive coverage of the various periods of the city's history. Climb to the top of the tower for an amazing view of the opposing Ivangorod castle, across the river where you can see a wall exactly from the same size of the tower..

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    • Historical Travel
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    Swedish lion

    by IneXisTenZ Written May 3, 2006

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    A stone carved lion high on a pedestal, this regal-looking symbol of Sweden was installed in 2000 to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the Battle of Narva, which kicked off the Great Northern War between Sweden and Russia. And they put the lion with the ass directed to russia!!

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    Iron cross monument

    by IneXisTenZ Written May 3, 2006

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    Located in the city's main park called Dark Garden, sits atop the Victoria and Pax Bastions, giving parts of it excellent views over the river. The iron cross monument installed in 1853 - a memorial to Russian soldiers killed in the siege of Narva during the Great Northern War. The Dark Garden is also an excellent starting point for exploring Narva's medieval defense system. But the cross is not original, they says that every 6 months people stole it because of iron's value..

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • lotharlerch's Profile Photo

    Russia's Past and Present in Estonia

    by lotharlerch Updated Aug 25, 2005

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    This Lenin, still standing upright (but in the backyard of Hermanni linnus) is the last Lenin remaining in Estonia. It seems that the Russians in Narva still have nostalgic feelings and therefore did not destroy him but almost nobody of them moved over the bridge after Estonia's independence. In the city is also a "Lenini prospekt", unthinkable elsewhere in Estonia. Today ethnic Russians form 96 % of the inhabitants of the city, before Estonia became Soviet in 1940 there were only a few Russians in Narva. But as elsewhere in Estonia a huge fraction of Estonians was deported to other regions of the Soviet Empire. The Russians who came to replace the Estonians were no deportees but it was allowed to them to go to Estonia as an award for specific merits.

    This has some quite bizarre consequences. Since Narva is in Estonia and Estonian is the one and only official language all is written in Estonian, even all menues in the restaurants (but the latter together with a Russian translation). but is seems that still today only quite a few people here understand Estonian. I could test it because I speak some Russian and because of my knowledge of Finnish I have also some command of Estonian (maybe almost enough to cover the Estonian needs for obtaining the Estonian citizenship).

    But the Russians are not the only Soviet legacy in this area. The other Soviet legacy is .one of Europe's biggest environmental problems. In the area around Narva are Europe's biggest deposits of oil shale and millions of tons of it are burnt to get electric energy. The cinders dust of it form in the meanwhile some of Estonia's highest mountains.

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    Jaanilinn in Russia across the Narva river

    by lotharlerch Updated Aug 25, 2005

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    Until the end of Soviet time Narva and the city of Ivangorod were more or less one city . For example they had one water supply system with the central in Narva. When after Estonian independence the city of Narva was invoicing from Ivangorod the money for the water which was delivered over the river and consumed there they did not pay. So Estonia was invoicing the water from Russia and Russia was not willing to pay so Estonia cut off the water delivery over the river. Instead of paying the Russians started to threat Estonia and it was quite a serious diplomatic conflict.

    Jaanilinn with the Narva  river

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  • lotharlerch's Profile Photo

    Jaanilinn - Ivangorod

    by lotharlerch Updated Aug 25, 2005

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    To visit one of the most impressive sights of Narva you would at least need a Russian visa today, if not more (I do not know whether the Russians allow tourists to visit the castle, simply because Russians are traditionally very worried about their frontiers and this castle is only a few meters away from Estonia and the European Union). When I was myself on Hermanni linnus I could not spot any people on or around Jaanilinn castle while Hermanni linnus was really crowded by tourists who all looked interested across the frontier.

    Jaanilinn seen from Hermanni linnus

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Narva Things to Do

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