Negotino Travel Guide

  • Negotino
    Negotino
    by Pijlmans
  • Negotino Town Square
    Negotino Town Square
    by Pijlmans
  • Negotino, Antigona
    Negotino, Antigona
    by Pijlmans

Negotino Things to Do

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    Monastery of St George 3 more images

    by Pijlmans Updated Sep 15, 2013

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    The Monastery of St George dates back to 1860.

    It is a working monastery where you can stay, see here for more information: Monastery of St George Lodging

    The monastery is located a few km north-east of Negotino, not far from the train station.

    Besides the Church dedicated to St George, there is a bell tower, monastery inns, a kitchen and showers/toilets for the rooms without those facilities.

    There are also several dogs and a cute kitten.

    The sheep and goat that were there when we arrived, did not make it until the end of our stay as they were ritually sacrificed on the second day of our stay...

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel

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    Clock Tower 4 more images

    by Pijlmans Updated Sep 15, 2013

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    The hexagonal clock tower (Saat Kula) is probably the most famous landmark of Negotino.

    It was built during the first half of the 19th century, some sources mention the year 1821.

    The clock tower suffered from a fire in 1913.

    It is located on a hill overlooking Negotino.

    You can have a look inside through a hole in the wall where probably once the door was. The wooden beams that once supported celinings and floors are still visible.

    Nowadays the Clock Tower does not have a clock anymore and is mainly in use by pigeons.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology
    • Architecture

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    Antigona 4 more images

    by Pijlmans Updated Sep 15, 2013

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    The archeological site Antigona, also spelled Antigoneia, Antigone or Antigonia, is located on a hill at the northern entrance of Negotino.

    It is thought to represent to ancient city founded by the Macedonian King Antigon Gonat (277-240 BC). The ancient village was likely destroyed during the big earthquake that hit Macedonia in the 6th century.

    An interesting detail about the name Ne-go-ti-no is that is appears to be An-ti-go-ne spelled backwards.

    The site is on top of the hill that displays the name of the town "NEGOTINO" in big white stone letters. A huge advertisement for "Tikves Winery" marks the spot as well.

    In order to reach the site, we asked permission to enter the premises of the brick factory "8 Noemvri" at the foot of the hill, as this seemed to be the only way to access the hill. See the picture.

    When we were there in 2012 the site was mainly overgrown with weeds and there was not much to see.

    The following is interesting information about the site that I found on a program for students and volunteers to help excavate the site in 2012. ( http://media.leidenuniv.nl/legacy/antigoneia-programma.pdf)

    The site is located on a high hill at the northern entrance of Negotino, with strategic position overlooking the valley of river Vardar and the wider area of Negotino ravene. On the flattened plateau remains of a defensive wall can be seen. They surround an area of about 3.5 hectares, yet numerous fragments of ceramics and other finds from various chronological periods are found not only on the plateau but in the nearest surrounding area as well, that give us different impression of the size of this ancient town.

    From the sporadic excavation campaigns in the 90's, and later in 2005-2007, we have knowledge of existence of several stratigraphic layers belonging to different chronological periods - from Classical to the Late Antique Period. According to the information from the earliest excavations on the site, test trenches at certain positions on the plateau have revealed remains even of earlier - prehistoric habitations.

    It is very interesting that beside its size, strategic position in this region and chronology, the name of this ancient town remains unknown. Among the theories regarding its identification most popular is the one that relates this site to ancient Antigoneia - a town named by Macedonian king Antigon Gonatas, in the third century BC. Antigoneia on Axios is mentioned on the famous map Tabula Peuntingeriana, one of the most important ancient sources for the geography of the Balkans. On this map Antigoneia is located 12 Roman miles downstream from Stobi and 11 miles upstream from Stenai, and these distances correspond best to the position of Gradiste near Negotino.

    Yet, there are different opinions about the location of Antigoneia. F. Papazoglou thought that the town could be located on Budur Ciflik or on the opposite hill Tremnik (Gradishte Czair). G. I. Kazarov and N. Vulic also thought that the town could be located on this hill. According to another theory Antigoneia was on the position of modern town Negotino but archaeological chance finds from Negotino belong mainly to the Roman times. This identification was rejected by prof. I. Mikulcic who surveyed the whole area in the 1980’s and has made the most cogently argued contribution to the problem so far. Mikulcic suggested that the town lay on the hill Gradishte. His strongest argument is the distance of Gradishte from Stobi and from Stenai (present Demir Kapija). They both correspond to the distances given in Tabula Peuntingeriana. The position of the hill on the left bank of river Vardar is additional fact that in support of this theory.

    The “quest” for ancient Antigoneia is a never ending challenge. Since 2006, the excavations of the local museum in Negotino brought to light large part of the late roman fortification. On the lower terrace few trenches discovered part of ancient necropolis while on the upper plateau remains of buildings and streets attracted the attention of scientist and public. These finds were the reason for the start of an international long term excavation project at Gradishte, in 2009. Coordinated by the National Museum of Macedonia in Skopje and the local museum of Negotino "Institute for classical and oriental studies from Valencia" (IVECO) in Spain, Gdansk University from Poland the project aim is to determine the character of the settlement (civil, military, etc), its urban plan and chronology, and finally to possibly identify this doubtfully important ancient town. These excavations will also contribute to the promotion not only of the site but of the local region of Negotino Municipality, and the archaeology of the Republic of Macedonia as well.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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