Clock Tower - Saat Kula, Skopje

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  • Clock Tower
    Clock Tower
    by Pijlmans
  • Clock Tower and Sultan Murat Mosque
    Clock Tower and Sultan Murat Mosque
    by Pijlmans
  • Clock Tower - Saat Kula
    by AlperIst
  • Pijlmans's Profile Photo

    Clock Tower

    by Pijlmans Updated Dec 14, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Clock Tower
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    The Clock Tower (or Saat Kula) was built in the 16th century (1566) and originally the top was made of wood. Its clock came from Hungary.

    The original structure was burnt in 1689 when the Austrian general Piccolomini set Skopje on fire during his retreat.

    The present Clock Tower dates from 1904. It has 8 sides of 3 m long and is vertically divided into 4 parts, ending in a dome. With its height of 39.8 m it is the highest clock tower of Macedonia.

    The clocks were damaged during the earthquake in 1963. Alledgedly the were sent to Sofia for repair but were stolen or disappeared. The pictures were taken in May 2008, just before new clocks were installed!

    The Clock Tower is in the yard of the Sultan Murat (or Hjunkar) Mosque, east of the Bit Bazaar in the northern part of Skopje. See the map of Skopje in my general tips.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Religious Travel

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    Saat Kula (Clock Tower)

    by maykal Updated Apr 28, 2008

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    Saat Kula (clocktower), Skopje
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    The other side of the Bit Pazar, you'll notice a tower looking a bit like a misplaced lighthouse on a hill beyond a busy road. If you manage not to be mown down by a speeding taxi, then climb up the hill and you'll find Skopje's clock tower, in the grounds of Sultan Murat Mosque. Not much to say about it really, except that it is dark red, dates from the 16th century, and the hill offers good views over old Skopje. I'm sure the views would be even better if you could climb up the tower itself, but that doesn't seem to be possible.

    The area surrounding the clocktower is worth a wander too, if you like old streets and houses, especially ones which haven't been spruced up for the tourists...it is very much a residential area, with no real sights but lots of character and atmosphere.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Abandoned Monument

    by mikey_e Written Jul 4, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Saat Kule

    Saat Kula (Clock Tower) rises majestically from a largely Albanian neighbourhood north of the Carsija and it is a monument that one would expect the Skopje authorities would play up in the sake of tourism. Instead, view of the Tower is obstructed from the Carsija by some hideous grey apartment buildings and it is only after you wander down the streets between these monstrosities that you can see the tower. It was damaged in the 1963 earthquake and still reads the time of the earthquake. I don't believe that you can enter the tower, but its beautiful red brick exterior provides great photo opportunities. You're more likely to be drawn into the mosque next door by the Imam, who is more than willing to give tours.

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  • traveloturc's Profile Photo

    Saat Kulesi /Clock Tower

    by traveloturc Updated Jul 22, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    saat kulesi

    July 1963, a strong earthquake damaged or completely destroyed about 80 percent of the buildings and killed more than 1,000 people. Skopje was quickly rebuilt around the railroad terminal, which was left as a memorial, with a broken clock marking the time of the earthquake 5:17 in the morning.Clock tower was build by turks.The clock mechanism was brought from Hungary after the capture of the town of Siged by the Turks. Many travelers mention the clock tower in their journals as a large and important building in Skopje and add that its sound can be heard several kilometers away.After the great fire in 1689, when the tower was seriously damaged it had to be repaired. Some alternations were made in 1904, and during the 1963 the third earthquake it was seriously damaged in addition to the Hunkar mosque.

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  • Clock Tower (Saat Kula)

    by gligor_kot Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Clock Tower is a Turkish building found east of the famous and oldest market place of Skopje, Bitpazar. It stands in the forecourt of Hjuncar - the mosque of Sultan Murat II. It is a hexagonal monument built in the 16th century. The clock mechanism was brought from Hungary after the capture of the town of Siged by the Turks. Many travelers mention the clock tower in their journals as a large and important building in Skopje and add that its sound can be heard several kilometers away.After the great fire in 1689, when the tower was seriously damaged it had to be repaired. Some alternations were made in 1904, and during the 1963rd earthquake it was seriously damaged in addition to the Hjunkar mosque.

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  • Arkeolog's Profile Photo

    Clock Tower of Skopje

    by Arkeolog Written Mar 30, 2009

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Clock Tower of Skopje

    This clock tower built in 1566/1573 by Ottomans. It is one of the longest clock tower in Balkans. It catches eyes with it's red brick colour. It also one of the city symbol of Skopje.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • AlperIst's Profile Photo

    From Clock Tower

    by AlperIst Written Feb 28, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you kindly ask the imam of the mosque next to it, he will open the tower for you and expect a little tip.

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