Mulhouse Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by antistar
  • Basel, Switzerland
    Basel, Switzerland
    by antistar
  • Strasbourg, Alsace
    Strasbourg, Alsace
    by antistar

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Mulhouse

  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Hotel de Ville - Old Town Hall

    by globetrott Written Jul 11, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The main reason for me to travel to Mulhouse is the excellent carmuseum and the Schlumpf-collection of more than 500 cars. Nevertheless the town of Mulhouse has a lot of other sights as well and the townhall is maybe the most beautifull house in town, so Dont miss to take a closer look at the townhall of Mulhouse as well: it shows various great frescoes on the facade, a building like you will not see at many other places in Europe.
    The building dates back to the year 1431 and "Hotel de Ville" is also the name for each and every townhall in France, it is the direct translation of townhall into french !

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    when the Eiffel-tower was still under construction

    by globetrott Written Jul 10, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jacquot  Tonneau a vapeur 1878 & Benz 1896
    4 more images

    These 2 cars of the 19th century date back to the time, when the Eiffel-tower was still under construction... ...and a giant and quite unique photo in the back shows us , what the tower looked like these days. Similar giant posters of events of the time, when the cars were built, will be shown all over the museum - in fact a really good idea !!

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Le Soudeur / Schweissdissi by Yves Carrey

    by globetrott Written Jul 9, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mulhouse:Le Soudeur / Schweissdissi by Yves Carrey
    4 more images

    Schweissdissi is the local name of this sculpture made of all sorts of tools, automotive parts and working instruments, a great work of art. A "Schweisser" is a "welder "in english and "un soudeur" in french.
    take a look at the extra pictures as well in order to see more of its fine details.
    Yves Carrey made this sculpture - read more about him on the weblink below !

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • globetrott's Profile Photo

    Cité du Train

    by globetrott Written Jul 9, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    There is a great museum for trains as well in Mulhouse: The museum "Cité du train" (=Train city) is showing trains from the beginnings in the 19th century untill the ones of our modern times.
    They say it is the biggest train-museum in the world well, who knows that for sure ? The same applies to the Schlumpf Collection
    You will see the special carriages for Charles de Gaulle, Winston Churchill and President Eisenhower , some wagons of the original Orient Express and a lot more exhibits.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Strasbourg

    by antistar Written Dec 4, 2013
    Strasbourg, Alsace
    4 more images

    When the French re-occupied Alsace after World War 2 in 1918, barely 2% of the population spoke French. They spoke Alsatian, a German dialect, which many still speak today. It's a German city, in France. You can see it in the architecture, the faces of the people, the surnames, the pork heavy dishes and now, after suppressing the language for many decades, in the dual language street signs. Underneath the eaves of Strasbourg's many Alamannic half-timbered buildings you'll read signs like Rue de Chat (Katzengas), Rue de la Monnaie (Muenzgass) and Rue Brulee (Brandgass). It's not just the proximity of Germany that lends Strasbourg a Germanic flavour - if the maps of Europe followed logic the city, like the state, would be in Germany.

    The result is one of the best preserved medieval German city centres - and it's right here in France. And it's not, as many believe, the result of Strasbourg being spared Allied bombs. Although it was considered a "friendly" city, its occupied status meant that it was bombed 13 times, mostly by Americans. The medieval core, including the Cathedral, was devastated. What saved Strasbourg relative to German cities was the Marshall Plan. France got more money more quickly than Germany and had less rebuilding to do. While the Germans raced to build cheap and fast accommodation for the millions of homeless, the French had the luxury of rebuilding their most beautiful cities.

    And Strasbourg is stunning. The city centre - an island in the diverging river Ill - is a concentration of teetering centuries old buildings with roofs that taper upwards like a narrow wedge of Munster cheese. The wood framed buildings tumble across the bridges, spilling out onto the other side of the river and making for grand walks along the Ill, under iron bridges bedecked in flowers, drawing you to the inevitable centrepiece of the city: Petite France. Here you will find no little France - that name is centuries old and derives from the disease of syphilis that was once treated here. Instead you will find Strasbourg at its finest, and that means German architecture like nowhere else on the planet. Three slivers off the Grande Île striking out into the onrushing waters of the Ill, a crush of houses pressing against the water's edge, threaded by cobbled streets and wooden bridges, and a series of three medieval guard towers to frame the city's iconic cathedral.

    A beautiful city, a historic city and now a very international city, home to the European Parliament, the Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rights. The Germanic culture and architecture has been transfused with Gallic style and gastronomy. You can visit Strasbourg and enjoy the best of both worlds.

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Basel

    by antistar Written Dec 4, 2013
    Basel, Switzerland
    4 more images

    Basel is an ancient city - older probably than the castle the Romans built upon the rise on which the city's cathedral now stands. It's an international city - standing at the tri-nation border of Switzerland, France and Germany, it has a long tradition of multinational operations and agreements. It's station was the first international station in the world, and was joined, unusually, by train stations operated by the French and German railway systems. It's also been the site of many international meetings and witnessed a number of important international peace treaties.

    It remains international and multicultural, with a third of the population being foreign and a mix of French and German voices in the air. Yet at the same time it's an unmistakably Swiss city. The streets are sparkling clean, the wealth of the city exudes from every building, and everything is very expensive. The old town, flanking the river Rhine, is beautifully preserved and the highlight of any visit.

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Colmar

    by antistar Written Dec 4, 2013
    4 more images

    Venice gets everywhere. Hamburg is just one Venice of the North. There's well over a dozen Venices of the East. There's a Venice Beach in California. Venezuela is Spanish for "Little Venice". And here in the Alsace, Colmar has its own little Venice, like London and Bamberg. But Colmar, with its half-timbered buildings, steeped roofs and crooked, leaning walls is more like little Strasbourg than little Venice.

    Colmar crams in the tourists like nowhere else in the Alsace. It probably has more tourists than Strasbourg, but the old town is a fraction of the size. The whole city is rich on tourism. The beauty of the city, and it is beautiful, is reduced by the strings of tour groups marching in front of the sights, posing for pictures, and filling up every available space. The tourists also attract the usual mix of beggars and misfits.

    It's well worth a visit, though. Walking the compact old town you will be falling over a hundred fantastic examples of Alsatian architecture, all untouched by bombs unlike nearby Strasbourg, and lovingly preserved for the tourists who flock to the city at all times of the year. The Little Venice quarter is also outstanding, although as little as you might imagine a little place in a little town like Colmar.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Mulhouse

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

92 travelers online now

Comments

Mulhouse Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Mulhouse off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Mulhouse sightseeing.

View all Mulhouse hotels