Strasbourg Local Customs

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Most Recent Local Customs in Strasbourg

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    Irréductibles petits producteurs d'Alsace

    by JLBG Written Dec 20, 2006

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    Irr��ductibles petits producteurs d'Alsace
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    Next to the Rue du Bain aux Plantes, place des Meuniers (Millers square) hosts a special marché de Noël, the "Irréductibles petits producteurs d'Alsace" (indomitable small producers of Alsace). They propose their own production, always natural, often organic : duck fat liver, smoked eel, whortleberries juice, honey, gingerbread, etc.

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    Christkindelsmärik in Place Broglie 5

    by JLBG Written Dec 20, 2006

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    Christkindelsm��rik in Place Broglie

    For those that do not want a hot beverage, there are also sweets and candies. Here there was a booth where they made peanuts coated with melted brown sugar. You can see in the background the apparatus that turns on its axis to make them and the candies in the foreground.

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    Christkindelsmärik in Place Broglie 4

    by JLBG Updated Dec 20, 2006

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    Christkindelsm��rik in Place Broglie
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    However, though a great many booth offer drink and food, many other sell non-edible items. Enlarge the photos and you will see hundreds, no sorry, thousands of small figures and animals designed for the crib! The crowd was not only in the alleys of the market but also on the shelves!

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    Christkindelsmärik in Place Broglie 3

    by JLBG Written Dec 20, 2006

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    Christkindelsm��rik in Place Broglie

    Though Alsace produces mostly white wine, it is very seldom offered as Vin chaud. This booth is the only one that I have seen that offered regular Vin chaud (red), Vin blanc chaud, Jus d'orange chaud (warm orange juice) and bière chaude. My advice is that regular Vin chaud is the one that tastes better!

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    Christkindelsmärik in Place Broglie 2

    by JLBG Written Dec 20, 2006

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    Christkindelsm��rik in Place Broglie
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    December is supposed to be very cold in Strasbourg. That was not really the case during our visit (global warming, hehe!) but nevertheless, it was cool enough to make all the "vin chaud" booth a must. Vin chaud (warm wine) is sold as small, medium or large glasses. It is usually made with red wine heated in large pots with star-shaped anis (badiane), cinnamon corks and lemon pieces.

    You also can buy Bretzels, gaufres (wafers), various kinds of sandwiches including amazing "tarte flambée sur baguette".

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    Christkindelsmärik in Place Broglie 1

    by JLBG Written Dec 20, 2006

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    Christkindelsm��rik in Place Broglie
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    Photo 1 and 2 show the main alley of Christkindelsmärik in Place Broglie, the most important Marché de Noël in Strasbourg. These photos were taken on Saturday 9th December around 11:30. It was already difficult to walk because of the crowd. There will be even more visitors in the afternoon, and even more on Sunday and even more when getting closer to Christmas! If you enjoy the crowd, you will know when to come. If you don't, you also know!

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting

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    Marchés de Noël

    by JLBG Written Dec 20, 2006

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    Christkindelsm��rik in Place Broglie
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    Each square in Strasbourg has its own Marchés de Noël. Though they have a lot in common, some are a bit specific. Here is the full list in 2006.

    Place Broglie and Rue de la Comédie : Christkindelsmärik
    Place Gutenberg : Village des Artisans Roumains (invited country changing every year).
    Place des Meuniers,: Irréductibles Petits Producteurs Alsaciens
    Place Benjamin Zix : Comptoir des rois Mages
    Place du Marché Neuf
    Place d'Austerlitz : Marché des Bredle
    Place de la Cathédrale
    Place du château.

    They are all working from November 25th to December 24th from 10:00 to 20:00 (till 21:00 on week-ends). A few of them work until December 31st.

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    Violet flavoured lemonade

    by Kate-Me Written Jul 25, 2006

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    violet lemonade!

    Friends took us out to lunch in Strasbourg to a restaurant they considered typical of Alsace, and they urged us to try a special drink which was on the menu......lemonade flavoured with violet syrup (made from real violets!) I was a bit hesitant but decided to try it anyway, since they all said it was their favorite......and it was actually rather delicious! And it's pink!
    The taste is hard to describe, but the closest we'd have to its flavour in Australia is a drink called Creamy Soda (which is red or brown).
    Was really glad I tried this drink. Several other places in France also used Violets - for example in Bordeaux we had a dessert which had lollies made from Violets on the top (tasted rather strange) and had the appearance of shriveled walnuts.

    Other specialties of Alsace include Choucroute (sauerkraut) and Tarte Flambe (in German it's something like Flamen Kuchen) which is translated on english menus as "Alsacian Pizza" but it seems to be much more than this, though the base is pizza-like.

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    local coins for bathrooms

    by judyaf Written Feb 23, 2006

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    arrived at the bus station and the bathrooms required French Francs (or whatever the local coins are). This can be a serious situation for women. The first thing I do when stopping to visit a city is get a lay of the land (bathrooms) for when needed!

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Women's Travel

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    Service in the Cathedral

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Feb 11, 2006

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    Strasbourg - Service in the Cathedral
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    There was a service, and the Cathedral was full of praying people.
    The priest read a pray, and parishioners repeated the certain places behind him. Then the organ played, the priest and chorus started singing, prayings picked them up. I listened to them, captivated by this majestic show.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Religious Travel

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    Alsacian cooking 101 : Bilberry tart

    by mariev Updated Dec 18, 2005

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    Easy to prepare, this is THE alsacian end of summer in the countyside's dessert (and it makes so pretty blue teeth)

    Bilberries (bluish black European blueberry) tart with custard

    Ingredients
    Sanded paste :
    250 grams flour, 125 grams butter, 1 pinch of salt, 1 egg yolk, 40 grams sugar, 1 half glass of water.
    Fruits
    500 grams of washed and sorted fresh bilberries.
    Custard
    2 eggs, 15 centilitres fresh cream, cinnamon powder (or vanilla sweetens according to tastes), some bread crumbs or biscuit remainders.

    Preparation
    Butter and flour a tart plate.
    Make a pie crust pastry with the indicated ingredients.
    Put the pastry in the tart plate as to form the crust and pick the bottom with a fork.
    Crush the biscuit remainders and powder the tart bottom with it (or with the bread crumbs).
    Fill with bilberries.

    Put it in the (preheated)oven.
    Cook 20 minutes (hot furnace).

    Beat the eggs, sugar, the cream and vanilla (or cinnamon) yo obtain the custard.
    Open the oven and pour the custard on the tart.
    Put it back in the oven for 15 minutes.

    Serving
    Let it cool and serve powdered with sugar freezes.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Food and Dining

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    DURING THE SUMMER SEASON.....

    by eden_teuling Updated Apr 6, 2004

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    LIGHT & MUSIC IN THE CATHEDRAL....

    During the summer season when most tourists are there, a spectacle of LIGHT AND MUSIC will be held INSIDE the Cathedral!

    For those who want to know EVERYTHING: go to the TOURIST Office where they really can help you with everything and....language is no problem, the ladies & gentlemen working there MASTER several languages!

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  • We speak french

    by koalatte Written Jan 3, 2004

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    Don't ever tell an alsacien that she or he speaks german and names of the street are written in french but also in alsacien not in german!!!!
    Alsacien is a local language which is a mix of french of german (have more german roots than french) due to historical facts.
    So don't forget this, alsacien is not german otherwise this friendly person you were talking to won't be that nice anymore :D

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    Strasbourg Is Alsatian. Don't Forget That!

    by DrewV Updated Jul 25, 2003

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    Bonjour?  Guten Tag?  Oh, whatever...

    Strasbourg is Alsatian. Yes, everyone speaks French, most speak German and English as well. But if you try a little Alsatian, they'll love you forever. Well, maybe not forever, but in a region this often conquered and re-conquered, any attempt will make you friends. See how happy I am? There, now no one can complain that I'm not in any of my own web pages... *grin*

    Anyway, you'll find that Germanifying your French, or Frenchifying your German, will do the trick. For example, to eat is not manger, but ësse, like the German essen, and to laugh is not rire but lãche, much like lachen in Deustchland.

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    Flammeküche (in English)

    by ATLC Updated Sep 15, 2002

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    Flammek��che

    Also known as Tarte flambée and traditionally baked in a bread oven.

    Ingredients

    Bread dough 500 gr
    Double cream 40 cl
    A soup spoon of rape oil
    Chopped onion 50 gr
    Smoked bacon 80 gr
    Butter 50 gr
    Seasoning: salt, freshly grated nutmeg

    Recipe

    Mix the butter and onion to a thick cream and season.
    Cut up the bacon in small pieces and brown them slightly.
    Roll out the pastry very thin, to about the size of an average oven baking plate.
    Spread the onion butter on the pastry.
    Brush the surface with some oil and scatter the bacon on it.
    Bake for 10 minutes at the highest temperature.

    Variation : scatter a good layer of grated cheese on top before baking.
    Variation 2: with mushrooms
    Variation 3: with apple and flambéed with Calvados
    Variation 4: with smoked salmon instead of bacon
    Variation 5: with onion, bacon and garlic

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Strasbourg Local Customs

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