Strasbourg Off The Beaten Path

  • Colmar, Alsace
    Colmar, Alsace
    by antistar
  • Basel, Switzerland
    Basel, Switzerland
    by antistar
  • Mulhouse, Alsace
    Mulhouse, Alsace
    by antistar

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Strasbourg

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Canals and rivers

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 6, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Canal from the Marne to the Rhine
    2 more images

    There are numerous rivers and canals in and around Strasbourg. As the sign says, this particular one is the canal from the Marne to the Rhine.

    Second photo: This ship anchored at Quai des Belges is called Naviscope Alsace and is a museum of the Rhine and navigation. It is unfortunately closed on Mondays, which is when I took this picture.

    Third photo: This is the Ill River with the European Parliament in the background.

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Basel

    by antistar Written Dec 4, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Basel, Switzerland
    4 more images

    Basel is an ancient city - older probably than the castle the Romans built upon the rise on which the city's cathedral now stands. It's an international city - standing at the tri-nation border of Switzerland, France and Germany, it has a long tradition of multinational operations and agreements. It's station was the first international station in the world, and was joined, unusually, by train stations operated by the French and German railway systems. It's also been the site of many international meetings and witnessed a number of important international peace treaties.

    It remains international and multicultural, with a third of the population being foreign and a mix of French and German voices in the air. Yet at the same time it's an unmistakably Swiss city. The streets are sparkling clean, the wealth of the city exudes from every building, and everything is very expensive. The old town, flanking the river Rhine, is beautifully preserved and the highlight of any visit.

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Mulhouse

    by antistar Written Dec 4, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mulhouse, Alsace
    4 more images

    Mulhouse has made the most of its industrial heritage by building not one but two of the greatest vehicle museums in the world. The Cité de l’Automobile has an enormous collection - around 520 cars in all. Its sister museum, the Cité du Train, has exhibits spread out of 6000 square meters. If all that isn't enough you also have Electropolis - the museum of electricity.

    It's not that Mulhouse hasn't got an old town, it's just very small and not a major attraction. It's not an ugly city, just a functional one. It's a place where work gets done and you won't find many tourists outside of the museum. It's sometimes called the French Manchester, but the French Cleveland or French Kaiserslautern would be equally apt.

    Was this review helpful?

  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Colmar

    by antistar Written Dec 4, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Colmar, Alsace
    4 more images

    Venice gets everywhere. Hamburg is just one Venice of the North. There's well over a dozen Venices of the East. There's a Venice Beach in California. Venezuela is Spanish for "Little Venice". And here in the Alsace, Colmar has its own little Venice, like London and Bamberg. But Colmar, with its half-timbered buildings, steeped roofs and crooked, leaning walls is more like little Strasbourg than little Venice.

    Colmar crams in the tourists like nowhere else in the Alsace. It probably has more tourists than Strasbourg, but the old town is a fraction of the size. The whole city is rich on tourism. The beauty of the city, and it is beautiful, is reduced by the strings of tour groups marching in front of the sights, posing for pictures, and filling up every available space. The tourists also attract the usual mix of beggars and misfits.

    It's well worth a visit, though. Walking the compact old town you will be falling over a hundred fantastic examples of Alsatian architecture, all untouched by bombs unlike nearby Strasbourg, and lovingly preserved for the tourists who flock to the city at all times of the year. The Little Venice quarter is also outstanding, although as little as you might imagine a little place in a little town like Colmar.

    Was this review helpful?

  • TomInGermany's Profile Photo

    Walking north of the town center

    by TomInGermany Written Jul 26, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of the churches along the route
    4 more images

    Strasbourg is a beautiful city to work in and around. Besides the city center which is worth an afternoon exploring, there are some points of interest to the north of the town center worth visiting. If you like to walk I recommend the following route.
    Where to start: I suggest you start at the Palais De La Musique Et Des Congres since there is a huge parking lot in front of the building and it is free. It is also right across from the Hilton which isn’t a bad place to spend the night.

    From the parking lot you should had south toward the city center on the Av. De la Pax avenue and along the tram line. Along the way you will see the Jewish synagogue and end up in the Plaza De La Republique which contains a statue of a mother cradling her two dead sons – one died fighting for France and one who died fighting for the Germans. From here head east on the Avenue De La Liberte toward the university. You’re next destination point is the Parc De La Citadelle (Citadelle Park) which contains the remains of the citadel built by Vauban in 1681. It is now a beautiful park well worth a stroll through along the walking paths. As a bonus there are bathrooms in the park.

    On a side note Strasbourg rates very high on our list of excellent cities to visit due to the high number of free public bathrooms located throughout the city.

    Continuing your walk, you now want to head up the river to the north along the bike/walking path. You will pass dozens of boats that have been converted into houseboats as well as dozens of swans. Continue along the pathway until you get to canal and turn left (west) heading toward the European Parliament. Along the way you may see some white stocks flying overhead or see one standing on one of the rooftops.

    When you get to the Parliament buildings you should continue along the canel (now heading southwest) and start making your way back to your car. As you have probably figured out by now you cannot rely on my directions but you should pick up a walking map of Strasbourg at the local IT office (or the Hilton).

    My guessing the walk is about six miles since it took us over two hours to walk it. However, if you are used to walking the time flies by since there are so many sights to see along the route.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • Beausoleil's Profile Photo

    Don't miss the Alsatian wine villages

    by Beausoleil Updated Oct 2, 2010

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Barr, a wine village near Strasbourg
    4 more images

    This photo was taken in Barr (see my Barr Travel Page) but there are so many charming and quaint wine villages in the area it is difficult to choose one. We usually stay in Barr and visit the surrounding area. This is one of those cases where you can't make a wrong choice. We love Ribeauville, Barr, Gertwiller, Obernai . . . the list goes on.

    Stop at the Strasbourg Tourist Office and get a brochure with wine route maps or just book a tour if you don't have a car.

    Click on the photo for pictures of other wine villages. Also check the web site for the Plus Beaux Villes of France below. There are now 154 "Most Beautiful Villages" of France and they are all lovely.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Festivals
    • Wine Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • Leipzig's Profile Photo

    The Alsace

    by Leipzig Updated Feb 24, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    picture borrowed from VT-Member tini58de!

    Strasbourg is the capital of the Alsace region. If you have some time catch a bike or a car and get out of the town. The Alsace region attracts with half-timbered houses, white wine and breathtaking landscape.
    Several civilizations left a footprint in the Alsace region. After the Celts came the Romans, the Alemanni and the Franks. The history of this region is as interesting as almost no other. After the Franco-Prussian War of 1870/71 the Alsace was annexed by Germany and the government tried to "Germanize" it. In the "Treaty of Versailles" of 1919 France got the Alsace back. Still today you see this region as gateway between France and German culture.

    Was this review helpful?

  • ruki's Profile Photo

    Rue du Bain aux Plantes

    by ruki Updated Oct 9, 2009

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Plant Bath Street

    It is one of the most beautiful street in Le Petite France. There you can see typical half timbered houses and the lot of good restaurants and hotels. The street is on the list of UNESCO World Heritages sites.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • ruki's Profile Photo

    Maison Kammerzell

    by ruki Written Oct 6, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This renaissance beautiful house is located near to Cathedral and it is one of the most interesting and beautiful houses in Strasbourg. It was built at the beginning of the 15 Century. In 1589 house had his architectural face as we can see today. Since 1929 the Maison Kammerzell placed on the list of Historical Monuments. Today it is very good restaurant and hotel. There you can get traditional the sauerkraut (marriages cabbage)

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ruki's Profile Photo

    The oldest wine

    by ruki Written Sep 29, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you are fancier of wine you must visit wine cellar of Strasbourg city hospital. This cellar founded in 1395 and renovated in 1994. Today it is a specific wine museum featuring more than 40 ancient barrels, a wine dating from beginning of the 17th century and barrel from the year 1472. This is one of the oldest wines in the world. This wine was tasting only three times – first tasting was held for the Swiss delegation in 1576, the second was in 1716 when was the renovation of Hospital and the last person who had tasted this wine was general Lecrerc in 1944.

    Cave Historique des Hospices de Strasbourg
    1, Place de l'Hopital
    67091 STRASBOURG
    Tel: +33 3 88 11 64 50
    Fax:+33 3 88 12 81 59

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting

    Was this review helpful?

  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    US Soldier Dedication - Strasbourg Cathedral

    by ATXtraveler Written Feb 23, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I was very impressed by a small engraving inside the Notre-Dame Cathedral that deserves mention. Many times while in the US, the French people get a bad rapport for their underwhelming response of gratitude toward the US servicemen that sacrificed their lives for their freedom from Germany in World War II. Here in this small city of Strasbourg, is a simple thank you and memorial for those who died fighting to free Alsace, the region of France closest to Germany. I think I might make a printout of this photo and carry it with me while seeing the rest of France just in case I run into another one of those who act under whelmed at the sacrifice the US has made for them.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • mariev's Profile Photo

    L'oeuvre Notre Dame

    by mariev Updated Feb 9, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Cour de l'oeuvre Notre Dame

    Place du Chateau, those very old houses, situated just between the Cathedral Notre Dame and the Palais des Rohan, host the workshops of the "Oeuvre Notre-Dame".

    Here, since nearly a tousand years, companions, sculptors, stone workers maintain the Cathedral in a good shape, using the same techniques than their medieval precursors.

    You can also find there a very ineresting museum dedicated to the medieval and renaissance periods.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mariev's Profile Photo

    Discover local customs : Musee Alsacien

    by mariev Updated Jun 8, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The museum's courtyard
    4 more images

    A very nice mid sized museum featuring daily life’s items from the 18th and 19th centuries : furnitures, costumes, cooking gear, tools, religious items, toys…all very well presented.

    The Musee Alsacien has been nicely renovated for it’s 100th birhday (end 2006) and occupies now 3 old (linked) pretty houses along the Ill.

    Address : 23-25, quai Saint-Nicolas - 67000 Strasbourg

    Open Wednesday to Monday, from 12h to 18h (10h to 18h on sundays)
    Entrance : free

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Imperial architecture

    by Nemorino Updated Jan 18, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Building in Rue du General Rapp
    2 more images

    This whole area of France, Alsace and Lorraine, was occupied by Germany from the end of the Franco-Prussian War in 1870 to the end of the First World War in 1918.

    The Germans built numerous buildings during this period, so it you are interested in German imperial architecture (also Jugendstil or Art Nouveau) you can find a lot of it in Strasbourg. They sometimes offer walking tours with explanations of the various buildings.

    The one in the first photo is in Rue du General Rapp. It was built by a German architect and contractor named Franz Scheyder, whose name is still chiseled in stone at the front of the building.

    Second photo: Buildings in the Rue Sellenick.

    Third photo: There is still some evidence of Jewish life in this neighborhood, such as this Jewish butcher shop.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Container art

    by JLBG Written Dec 21, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Container art
    2 more images

    I was surprised to find stuck on a wall of the Quai de la Petite France, the sticker shown on the first photo and did not understand at first what it meant.

    Later, close to the Ponts Couverts, I found what is shown on the second and third photos. Six containers of the type used for cargo transport were fitted together and used for a temporary décor with landscapes posters affixed on them. Why not? Anyway, that can be easily removed!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Strasbourg

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

81 travelers online now

Comments

Strasbourg Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Strasbourg off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Strasbourg sightseeing.

View all Strasbourg hotels