Barrage Vauban, Strasbourg

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  • Barrage Vauban, Strasbourg
    Barrage Vauban, Strasbourg
    by antistar
  • Barrage Vauban, Strasbourg
    Barrage Vauban, Strasbourg
    by antistar
  • Barrage Vauban, Strasbourg
    Barrage Vauban, Strasbourg
    by antistar
  • black_mimi99's Profile Photo

    THE BARRAGE VAUBAN, LARGE FORTIFIED LOCK

    by black_mimi99 Written Dec 12, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    From the middle ages to the 17th century, a fortified covered bridges device ensured the urban defense of the vulnerable coast where the Ill is divided into four channels.

    The progress of the fortification make this obsolete system, so that one student a little upstream from the old bridges a great fortified lock that spans the entire width of the river Ill. They gave the book the name of barrage Vauban, this engineer who designed the plans made by his collaborator Jacques Tarade around 1685-1700.

    Under each of the thirteen arches of the lock, mobile iron panels allow to control the flooding of the southern front of the city and, where appropriate, make it impractical to the attackers, still hindered by dissuasive harrows. Three arches will be raised in 1784, in order to promote the flow of seasonal torrential waters.

    THE BARRAGE VAUBAN
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    The Old Town

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 6, 2013

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    The little old streets and old buildings around the cathedral are very quaint and are amazingly popular. All of us tourists go there.

    When you get to the Place du Marché aux Cochons de Lait (fourth photo), please don't get the idea that they drink pig's milk in Strasbourg, even though cochon means pig and lait means milk.

    A cochon de lait is actually a suckling pig (Ferkel in German and in the local Ascatian dialect), and this square is presumably where they used to buy and sell suckling pigs in some obscure phase of Strasbourg's long history.

    Nowadays their main business is selling masses of souvenirs to all of us tourists, and you can't buy a suckling pig any more unless it has been roasted at one of the many restaurants. Spanferkel is a traditional dish here as well as across the river in Germany.

    Second photo: Barrage Vauban, designed by the famous military engineer Sébastien Le Prestre, marquis de Vauban (1633-1707).

    Third photo: Towers near Barrage Vauban.

    Fourth photo: Souvenir shops in the Square of the Suckling Pigs.

    1. Pont Saint-Martin 2. Barrage Vauban 3. Towers near Barrage Vauban 4. Souvenir shops, Square of the Suckling Pigs

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Barrage Vauban

    by antistar Written Oct 1, 2013

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    As if the formidable defences of the Pont Couverts weren't enough, the people of Strasbourg deployed a further deterrent - a barrage across the river ill that let no ship pass by. Several stories high already, another level was added in 1865. In the modern era, when the Swiss were no longer deemed a threat, this top level was turned into an observation deck. The barrage provides the finest views in the city by far.

    Barrage Vauban, Strasbourg Barrage Vauban, Strasbourg Barrage Vauban, Strasbourg Barrage Vauban, Strasbourg

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  • mariev's Profile Photo

    The Barrage Vauban

    by mariev Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Barrage (dam) Vauban (aka the great lock) was built around 1690, using the plans from the king's Louis XiV architect Vauban (thus the name).

    It was intended to reinforce the town's security : the gates on the water (under the 'bridge') could be closed to block the invaders' boats and the soldiers could turrn on the water works to slow down the pedestrian troups.

    If you have a closer look at the photo, you will notice that 3 arches are higher than the others : in the 18th century, the neighbourhood's peasants noticed that each spring, their fields were overflowded when the snow melted : the "blocking function'" was working a bit too well. After years of discussions, the military authorities accepted to give some more room to the water flood.

    Nowadays, a panoramic terrace occupies the top of the dam and the rooms inside hold rotating exhibitions (sculpture, mineralogy, moden art ...).

    Barrage Vauban
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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Barrage Vauban

    by JLBG Written Dec 20, 2006

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    The Barrage Vauban (Vauban dam) was built later, again as a protection against any attack of the city coming by the river. It is not really a dam but a building built across the river. Heavy iron gates could be lowered to forbid the passage of any boat on the Ill.

    They can be visited and offer a nice view on the Petite France.

    The first photo shows a typical building of Strasbourg, with several levels (two or three) of dormer windows. As the place was a swamp, no goods could be kept underground and they had to be kept in attics that had several levels. Until the 19th, the windows were not fitted with glasses for better air drying.

    Barrage Vauban Barrage Vauban
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  • Kate-Me's Profile Photo

    Vauban Barrage

    by Kate-Me Updated Jul 23, 2006

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    Strasbourg is also home to some beautiful bridges, including the medieval Ponts Couverts.

    A few meters from the Covered Bridges is the Vauban Barrage (Vauban Dam wall). It allowed the whole south front of the city to be flooded when needed and was built around the year 1690.

    At the summit of the structure is a grassy panoramic terrace, from which you get great views of the Cathedral in the distance, the city skyline and the canals.
    You can also walk through the insides of the bridge (but not exit at the other end) which contain many stone relics, some of which had toppled off the Cathedral over time, and been replaced by replicas, with the originals resting behind wire fences inside this covered bridge.

    Accessible every day (except 14 and 15/07 because of the Bastille Day fireworks from the top) from 9am to 7.30 pm. Free entry.

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  • codrutz's Profile Photo

    Barrage Vauban

    by codrutz Updated Jul 7, 2004

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    The most famous landmark in Petit France Quarter are the Covered Bridges (Ponts Couverts), their three defensive towers and the Barrage Vauban.

    The Barrage Vauban is a defensive dam built on the river Ill in the 17th century. On its top, from the Terrase Panoramique, you can see the Petit France with its houses reflected in the still waters, the Covered Bridges, the towers and the spire of the Cathedral in the background (see my first picture in this section)

    Useful info - there are toilets inside the barrage (just in case).

    Barrage Vauban - Strasbourg, France

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  • Bjorgvin's Profile Photo

    Barrage Vauban

    by Bjorgvin Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Barrage Vauban (Vauban´s Dam) or Le Grande Ecluse (Big Lock).
    The dam was built in the 17th century on the River Ill, which runs through the city. It was built to control the river, but also as a defense against invading forces. It was based on the plans of Sebastien Vauban (1633-1707), a soldier, military engineer and (late in life) Marshal of France, whose fortifications and revolutionary ideas in siege warfare had great influence in the reign of king Louis XIV. From the top of the barrage is a great view of Strasbourg.

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