La Petite France, Strasbourg

4.5 out of 5 stars 4.5 Stars - 51 Reviews

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  • Tour Boat Being Raised within Loche
    Tour Boat Being Raised within Loche
    by Mikebb
  • La Petite France
    by Mikebb
  • At Top of Loche
    At Top of Loche
    by Mikebb
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    Tour Boat Negotiating Locke

    by Mikebb Updated Apr 9, 2014
    Tour Boat in Loche
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    Follow the progress of the tour boat as it progresses through the locke. It only took a few minutes ( less than 5 minutes) to float to the top.

    Watching from the bank makes one marvel at the initiative of man as he harvested water flow many centuries ago.

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    La Petite France

    by antistar Updated Mar 16, 2014

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    La Petite France, Strasbourg
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    It's the geography that gives La Petite France its special place in Strasbourg. Three fingers of land jut out into the surging waters of the river Ill. These little islands create rushing narrows perfect for powering watermills and feeding the thirsty tanneries that crowded along the waterfront. These Mittelstand houses form what is now a little Germanic Venice - a small crush of half-timbered buildings clinging to the canal banks.

    From the three guard towers of the Pont Couverts to the bridge of Rue de Moulins, it's Strasbourg's tourist magnet - the beauty of the city compressed into a few tight, cobbled streets. And given it is a Germanic beauty, one might wonder how it could be a "Little France", but that is a misnomer caused by history, again informed by geography.

    The isolation of the islands meant that it was used for housing those infected by syphilis, mostly soldiers coming back from the wars. To many in Europe the disease was thought to have originated in France, hence the nickname "the French disease". Thus for housing victims of "the French Disease" the area became known as "Little France".

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    La Petite France

    by black_mimi99 Written Dec 12, 2013

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    La Petite France

    Cris-crossed by narrow lanes, canals and locks, Petite France is where artisans plied their trades in the Middle Ages. The half-timbered houses, sprouting veritable thickets of scarlet geraniums in summer, and the riverside parks attract the masses, but the area still manages to retain its Alsatian atmosphere and charm, especially in the early morning and late evening. We love walking here, admired the half timbered houses and also taste the local food.

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    Visit Petite France

    by Beausoleil Updated Oct 29, 2013

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    Petite France, Strasbourg
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    Petite France in Strasbourg is full of old half-timbered buildings and narrow streets. As you wander through the area, be sure to look up. You will see wagon wheels on top of many buildings. These are to encourage storks to nest there and you will see the occasional stork nesting. That's when you will realize your zoom lens was worth every penny!

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    Petite France

    by Dabs Written Oct 7, 2013

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    After seeing photos of the Petite France area of Strasbourg, I was sold on coming here, what's an extra couple hours in the car when you can spend a day wandering through such a beautiful town? This area of Strasbourg is clearly more German in it's architecture, so what's with the name? The theories that I have read are not so complimentary to the French, one is that there was a hospital here to treat venereal disease which the Alsatians blamed the French for spreading, another theory is that this was the part of town where the French hung out and they were considered less clean than the Alsatians.

    Regardless of the origin of the name, this is the loveliest part of Strasbourg, photo opportunities abound and when the sun is shining it is hard to take a bad photo of the half timbered houses, dressed with flowers and overlooking the Ill River

    In the Middle Ages, the Petite-France was the tanning-houses and slaughterhouses area, it's hard to imagine how unpleasant the area would have been with all the horrible smells and sights that would have accompanied such industry

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    Little France

    by shavy Written Jul 30, 2013

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    Little France
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    A visit to the old town of Strasbourg consists of two parts. First, there is the Cathedral and then at the other end there is La Petite France. To walk from one to the other you take the best Grand Rue... you will be overwhelmed by half-timbered houses over 300 years old. Many of these houses have become shops or restaurants

    The old town of Strasbourg is completely surrounded by water, on the one side of Ill
    On the northern edge of this a diversion canal. These navigable rivers were important for trade but also had to be defended. Therefore, a dam built by the famous fortress builder Vauban. On the Barrage Vauban you have a beautiful view over La Petite France and the Halles.

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  • shavy's Profile Photo

    Petite France

    by shavy Written Jul 30, 2013
    Petite France
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    Strasbourg's most picturesque and romantic quarter features narrow streets, the banks of the Ill, and half-timbered houses along the canal taking advantage of the many canals that pass through it
    Here the visitor finds traditional shops selling handmade products, as well as quite a few restaurants

    Take advantage of the sidewalk tables have a stroll along the riverfront enjoy the view of the entire neighbourhood

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    MAISON DES TANNEURS

    by balhannah Written Jun 19, 2013

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    Maison des tanneurs

    Built in 1572 was the Maison des tanneurs, an old Tannery that was also known as "Gerwerstub."
    It was in 1949, when the Tannery became a Restaurant, and then in 1972 was restored. At the Maison de Tanneurs, traditional Alasation cruised is served, and the views from the dining room are of the canal. It located in the Petite-France area of Strasbourg

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    PETITE FRANCE

    by balhannah Written Jun 18, 2013

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    Petite-France
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    The Petite France is one area in Strasbourg which you MUST NOT MISS.
    It's a picturesque area of old Strasbourg where once Fishermen, Millers and Tanners lived and worked. The buildings are gorgeous, all shapes and sizes, most are half-timbered buildings from the 16th & 17th centuries. Their sloping roofs open out onto lofts where hides were once dried.
    Now they are decked out with baskets of flowers, quite a few are Restaurants and Shops. It was great walking amongst these old homes, and seeing their reflections in the River Ill.

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    LAUNDRY TERRACES

    by balhannah Written Jun 18, 2013

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    Laundry terraces
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    A pretty and interesting part of our cruise, was when we were near Pont St-Martin, which is also known as washing bridge. Our guide told us the poor used to wash their clothes here [ which was downstream] while the rich used the cleaner water upstream. They had to be very careful not to let the clothes disappear down the river. In the Boat, we had a good view of the half-timbered homes, one which is now a Restaurant.

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    THE VAUBAN DAM BARRAGE/LOCK

    by balhannah Written Jun 18, 2013

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    Vauban Barrage
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    The Vauban Dam Barrage/Lock we saw on the cruise, and we also returned to walk through the passage-way. Located close to the Covered Bridges, this Barrage/Lock was built under Louis XIV in 1690. This fortified lock not only prevented assailants from gaining entry to the city, but also made it possible to flood the entire southern front, also protecting it against attack.
    The Barrage has a panoramic terrace where you can see the layout of the city and its network of canals.
    We walked through the Barrage and found it filled with lots of old sculptures. Will these always be here, or are they just stored here, I don't know the answer! It was quite interesting though!

    OPEN from 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. every day
    Closed 14/15th July.
    FREE ENTRY

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    CITY WALLS & BRICK TOWERS

    by balhannah Written Jun 18, 2013

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    Fortified Towers
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    Strasbourg was a walled city in the 13th century. This was when four brick fortified Towers were built. The Matzenturm was razed in 1869 by fire, but the other three are still standing today. The Heinrichsturm was used as a Civil prison, the Hans von Altheimturm and the French Tower were used as Military prisons in the 18th & 19th centuries.

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  • Aunt_Bertha's Profile Photo

    La Pétit France

    by Aunt_Bertha Written May 8, 2012
    La P��tite France

    This is the medieval center of Strasbourg and one of my favorite places in that city. In the middle ages La Pétite France used to be the tanners quarter. Nowadays it is one of Strasbourg's main attractions with its narrow, winding lanes and its charming, well-preserverd, half-timbered houses. On holidays and during the summer vacation season it can be quite crowded though. A large part of La Pétite France (Little France) is located along the Ill river and that makes strolling around even more attractive. The lovely reflections of those charming historic buildings are well worth a visit and so are many of the delicious restaurants and cafés.

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  • Ujamaflip's Profile Photo

    Petite France - Maison des Tanneurs

    by Ujamaflip Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Maison des Tanneurs

    The Maison des Tanneurs in Petite France is today actually a restaurant. On our visit to Petite France we didn`t dine here, nevertheless, the building is worth a visit, if only to see from the outside. The house is the former seat of the tanner's guild, and is a beautifully decorated half-timbered building in the heart of Petite France.

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    La Petite France Can Be Walked in Day and Evening

    by hquittner Written Jul 7, 2010

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    Edge of Canal
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    There are still many buildings in La Petite France that are old including several restaurants for lunch or dinner. The river here divides into four arms and here there are canals and locks and a barrage with rushing water and a pleasant park. At the south edge is the Eglise St.-Thomas built at the end of th12C; it became a Lutheran church in 1529.

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