Bordeaux Off The Beaten Path

  • palais Rohan, city hall or hotel de ville
    palais Rohan, city hall or hotel de...
    by gwened
  • closeup hotel de ville Bordeaux
    closeup hotel de ville Bordeaux
    by gwened
  • hallway display details history of winemaking
    hallway display details history of...
    by gwened

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Bordeaux

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Upper floor of the CAPC

    by Nemorino Updated Apr 11, 2015

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    OK, I agree that it's ridiculous to dump a pile of coal on the floor, draw a white line around it and call it a work of art. It can’t even qualify as a provocation, since similar things have been done so often in recent decades.

    On the other hand, I must admit that this was the only item on the entire second floor of the CAPC (Museum of Contemporary Art) that engaged my imagination in any way, because it got me thinking about the ways coal has impacted on my life. As I wrote several years ago on my Essen page here on VirtualTourist:

    Long before I ever toured the Zollverein colliery in Essen, there was another phase of my life in which I was very interested in coal mining, and that was during the United Mine Workers strike of 1948. I was eight years old at the time and was just starting to realize that there were other pages in the newspaper besides the funnies.

    We didn't subscribe to a newspaper, but my father bought the Chicago Daily News every day after work at the C&NW station and read it on the train. When he got home I eagerly snatched the paper from his hand, threw it and myself down on the living room rug and of course read the funnies first, but then turned to the front page to see if that awful John L. Lewis, the glowering union leader, was still blocking our coal supply.

    I knew about coal because we had a big pile of it in a bin next to the furnace in our basement. My father assured me we had enough to keep us warm all winter, but I was dubious. Also I was worried that he might get stuck in downtown Chicago some day if the C&NW didn't have enough coal to run its steam locomotives.

    A few years later we switched to gas heating, around the same time the railroad started phasing out its steam locomotives in favor of diesels.

    Then there were my visits to the former German Democratic Republic (aka East Germany), where there were often piles of coal on the sidewalks in front of the houses – but in the GDR it was always brown coal, not the more expensive black coal as seen in this exhibit.

    Several years ago, at the suggestion of a French friend (she gave me the book, in fact), I read the novel Germinal by Émile Zola (1840-1902), about the exploitation of coal miners in northern France in the 19th century.

    Oh, and recently I have been reading about the ugly practice of mountaintop removal in the Appalachian region of the United States, in which entire landscapes are destroyed and rivers polluted, just to get more coal.

    Second and third photos: Random examples of some of the other displays on the second floor (two flights up) of the CAPC.

    Fourth photo: A map showing “walls of separation” in different parts of the world.

    Fifth photo: The roof of the Entrepôt Laîné.

    Address: 7 Rue Ferrere, 33000 Bordeaux
    Directions: VCub bicycle station Allée de Chartres
    Location, aerial view and photo on monumentum.fr
    Phone: 05 56 00 81 50
    Website: http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/

    Next: From Jeanne d’Arc to Jeanne d’Oc

    Galerie Foy Galerie Foy Overtakelessness Walls of separation Roof of Entrep��t La��n��
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    Porte Dijeaux

    by Nemorino Updated Apr 11, 2015

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    The Porte Dijeaux, also known as Porte Dauphine is a stone gateway that was built from 1748-1753 as an entrance to the city – now in the city center.

    Readers of the French author François Mauriac may be interested to learn this gateway was built of stone from the quarry in Frontenac. This is a hard and dense sort of stone that was often used for the foundations of buildings.

    Because stone was such an important building material in Bordeaux – and because there were something like 1400 stone quarries in use near Bordeaux in the 18th and 19th centuries – they tended to keep track of which kind of stone was used in which part of which building, and which quarry it came from.

    This is a totally different situation from Toulouse, for example, which had no stone quarries nearby, so most of the old buildings are made of flat pinkish bricks. It is also very different from the situation in Besançon, where the old buildings in the city center were all made of local stone from the same quarry, in the nearby Forest of Chailluz.

    Additional photos: House at 18-20, rue Porte Dijeaux, Bordeaux.

    Directions: VCub bicycle station Puy Paulin
    Location, aerial view and photo on monumentum.fr
    Tram B: Gambetta
    Website: http://bordeaux.360cityscape.fr/rue-de-la-porte-dijeaux/148/

    Next: Place du Palais

    Porte Dijeaux House at 18-20, rue Porte Dijeaux Gateway to the house Gateway and house
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    Place du Palais

    by Nemorino Written Apr 11, 2015

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    This pleasant little square, with Porte Cailhau in the background, is now largely pedestrianized. It has several popular cafés and restaurants, but just one narrow lane for limited motor traffic, with access controlled a bollard which can be lowered for emergency vehicles or deliveries.

    But it has only been this way since 2010. Before that it was nothing more than an ugly parking lot for cars (see the photo from 2008 in the website below), and for many years before that it was a bus terminal, which is surprising in retrospect because the shape of the square made it very difficult for the buses to maneuver.

    Second and third photos: Cafés at the Place du Palais.

    Directions: VCub bicycle station Place du Palais
    Tram A: Place du Palais
    Location, aerial view and photo of Porte du Palais on monumentum.fr
    Website: http://www.33-bordeaux.com/place-du-palais.htm

    Next: CAPC in Entrepôt Laîné

    Place du Palais Caf��s at Place du Palais Caf��s at Place du Palais
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    CAPC in Entrepôt Laîné

    by Nemorino Written Apr 11, 2015

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    The CAPC is Bordeaux’s Museum of Contemporary Art. The initials CAPC stand for Centre d’Arts Plastiques Contemporains, which was the museum’s official name when it was founded in 1973. They have since changed the name slightly, but kept the old initials.

    It is located in an old warehouse near the harbor, which was used for many years for the storage of merchandise brought in by ship from the French colonies. The building is unusual (for Bordeaux) in that the outer walls are made mainly out of bricks, though the foundation and some of the inner walls and arches are made of stone.

    The warehouse was built from 1822 to 1824 and then used to receive and store products such as sugar, coffee, cocoa, cotton, spices, dye plants and oilseeds which had been produced by planters in the colonies and were subsequently re-exported to northern Europe by Bordeaux merchants.

    Second photo: The large room on the ground floor of the building is called the nef et déambulatoire (nave and ambulatory) – architectural vocabulary which is usually used for churches and hardly ever for warehouses. The interior space is quite stunning, but the artworks on display are anything but. The few sculptures and paintings are of mediocre quality (IMHO) and are surrounded by lots of empty space. But I believe the displays are changed frequently, so you may have better luck some other year.

    Third photo: This may not have been exactly what the artist intended.

    Fourth photo: The impressive but nearly empty nef et déambulatoire as seen from above.

    Fifth photo: The Grande Galerie (Large Gallery) on the first floor, i.e. one flight up. This gallery was empty when I was there, though theoretically it could be used for exhibits if they had anything to display.

    Address: 7 Rue Ferrere, 33000 Bordeaux
    Directions: VCub bicycle station Allée de Chartres
    Location, aerial view and photo on monumentum.fr
    Phone: 05 56 00 81 50
    Website: http://www.capc-bordeaux.fr/

    Next: Upper floor of the CAPC

    Entrep��t La��n�� Nef et d��ambulatoire In the museum Nave and ambulatory from above Grande Galerie
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    By the Garonne River

    by Nemorino Written Apr 11, 2015

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    To travel by bicycle between my hotel and the city center, I often used this bicycle path along the Garonne River. Apparently the river banks have been upgraded in recent years, though I don’t know how they were before, so I can’t say how much has been changed.

    Second and third photos: People cooling off in the water spray by the river on a very hot (and soon to be stormy) summer day.

    Website: http://www.bordeaux.fr/p57231/circuler

    Next: Hôtel du Faisan

    Bicycle path by the river Water spray by the river Water spray by the river

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  • gwened's Profile Photo

    abbey Sainte Croix or Holy Cross, Bordeaux

    by gwened Written Aug 6, 2014

    This is an old abbey in a nice quaint district The Church was benedictine monastery before. Although the Abbey was founded in the 7C, the present church was built until the late 11C to 12C with a Romanesque façade saintongeais. It has the shape of a Latin cross. It consists of a nave of five bays to collateral, a transept with a large apse on each arm and a polygonal apse.

    The monk Dom Bédos de Celles built the organ in 1750, currently considered a masterpiece. It was restored in 1995 by the factor Pascal Quoirin. Two works of the painter Guillaume Cureau (c. 1595-1648) are preserved: Saint Mommolin healing a possessed and Saint Maur curing a sick, and the Exaltation of the Cross, by A. Bourgneuf, 1636.

    it is located at Place Pierre Renaudel , and you can reach on public transport tramway : station Sainte Croix (line C) walk 100 meters

    abbey Church Sainte Croix or Holy Cross
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    muséé du vins de Bordeaux

    by gwened Written Nov 24, 2013

    Cellier des Chartrons, 41 Rue Borie, 33000 Bordeaux just across from the quai des chartrons you will have a wonderful museum in the city with all the great bottles and tastings before even going to the real wine area of the médoc

    Its a smallist place for a museum but very compact, plenty to see the whole process with good documentation and great tastings.

    you have audioguides for 3€ to rent. It is open in the summer every day from 10h to 18h. the winter open everyday from 14h -18h except weekends opens 10h to 18h. The admission is 7€ with tastings or 5€ without for adults and so on.

    hallway display details history of winemaking the cellar and the main bottles
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    big clocktower(porte St Eloi) of Bordeaux

    by gwened Written Nov 15, 2013

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    a unique building tower housing a big clock. A Landmark in Bordeaux and nice to stop by, on a picturesque street. Grosse cloche de Bordeaux.

    It is inscribe on the clocktower the following
    J'appelle aux armes (I call to arms)
    J'annonce les jours ( I announce the days)
    Je donne les heures (I give the hours)
    Je chasse l'orage ( I chase the storms)
    Je sonne les fêtes ( I announce the feasts)
    Je crie à l'incendie ( I call when fire).

    A bit of history
    It is one of the few civil (with the Cailhau gate) that the city retains from the middle ages. It has just been restored in 2011.

    It was built in the 15th century on the remains of the ancient Porte Saint-Eloy (also known as door Saint James) from the 13th century (backed by the Church of Saint - Eloi from the 12th century), opened on the rampart of the 13th century and under which passed the pilgrims of St James (Santiago de Compostela). Where the name of the Saint-James Street nearby.

    It is composed of two circular 40 meters high towers linked by a central building and dominated by the Golden leopard. Originally it was a set of four round and crenellated towers to which were attached to the 12th century, two other towers and amounted to a floor. These last two were at the location of the middle of the present course Victor Hugo who at the time was a ditch along the rampart. All successive changes made between the 15th and the 17th century will transform the primitive appearance of this door become belfry.

    The magistrates of the city sounded the Bell to give the signal of the harvest and alert the population in the event of start of fire. This is the reason why it has always been the symbol for the city and still appears on the coat of arms of the city.

    Bordeaux were very attached to this Bell. Moreover, when the King wanted to punish them for their insubordination, it was sufficient to remove it from Bordeaux by King Henri II and broken to punish them for their revolt of 1548 (the jacquerie of the pitauds); clock tower Bell returned in 1561 to the delight of the good people. After the fire of 1755, campanile was done with a crown towers covered pepper-shaped.

    At the centre of the grille wrought iron (18th century) which closes the tower bay in which is located the Bell, a coat of arms represents the arms of the city while north face, grimacing gargoyles of the 15th century remain with, below, inscriptions carved on black marble and dated 1592.

    The current Bell was cast in June 1775 by refiner Turmel. It weighs 7,800 kg for two meters high. She rang the commemoration of the victory of May 8 1945, since due to its weight and the risk of cracks that cause the vibrations of the Bell, it did ring that on a few occasions, its refitting in the campanile, following its restoration and during the visit of General de Gaulle in the city April 10, 1961.

    It sounds annually five times per year. 1 January (new year), may 8 (May 8, 1945 victory), on 14 July (national holiday), August 28 (liberation of Bordeaux in 1944) and on 11 November (Armistice of 1918) in the presence of many spectators at 11h.

    Represented on the vane, English leopard recalls the arms of the province of English Guyenne which Bordeaux was the capital. The clock built in 1759 by the plans of the mathematician and astronomer Paul Larroque has replaced that of 1567 performed by Raymond Sudre. Above it is a dial to solar equation.

    The tower can be visited from 14h to 17H and cost 5€ admission.

    grosse cloche at porte St Eloi
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    hotel de ville palais de rohan

    by gwened Written Nov 15, 2013

    This is a monument in Bordeaux, near the cathedral and tour beyland, wonderful architecture and history all in one.

    The area is great to see and be seen in the city and a great crossroads of people there.
    A bit of history to make you see it ::)

    The Rohan Palace was built for the Archbishop of Bordeaux Ferdinand Maximilien Mériadec of Rohan in 1771. (also the great shopping center is name after him Mériadec)

    Hotel of the Archdiocese until the Revolution, Hôtel du Département then seat of the Revolutionary Court in 1791, hotel of the prefecture in 1802, imperial palace of Napoleon I in 1808 and royal castle in 1815 under Louis XVIII, the palais Rohan became City Hall in 1835.
    This set is done in a style Louis XVI monumental, sober, balanced.

    The Palace has a portico of Ionic order preceding the cour d'honneur at the end of which is the harmonious façade in the pediment sculpted by Barthélemy Cabirol. It consists of a vast body of logis flanked by two low wings back square that connect it to a colonnade. The quadrangle thus bounded is closed by a portico with arcades open side street, in the center of which opens a monumental portal. Chanted by columns, the wall offers at first a scenery of arches. . In the background, a lively flat façade of a central stem is needed by its rigour and its drought.

    the rear façade is extended by two low pavilions with balusters which bays are surmounted by garlands. This drought in the lines and composition resulted from the presence of Victor Louis to Bordeaux, which at the same time developing the Grand Theatre. Inside, exhibits the paneling of Louis XVI style in lime tree wood are decorated with plant motifs made by the sculptor Barthélemy Cabirol.

    The Archbishop dite dining offers a trompe l'oeil decor in the Pompeian style. It was decorated in 1783-84 by the painter Giovanni Antonio Berinzago. It is said that it is in this room that the young Eugène Delacroix, then son of the prefect discovered his vocation.

    Other decor in the taste of the Renaissance selected reflects the refinement of Bordeaux interiors from this period. The staircase monumental located on the ground floor of the corps de logis is considered to be one of the masterpieces of French stereotomy. The municipal Council Chamber was built in 1889. It is characteristic of the official architecture of the third Republic.

    Finally, the building is surrounded by beautiful gardens in English style since 1882. On each side of the back garden lie two wings that were built in 1880 to house the Museum of fine arts. Two fires in 1862 and 1870 were of little damage to the exteriors, but changed the distribution of the interiors.

    palais Rohan, city hall or hotel de ville closeup hotel de ville Bordeaux
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    bridge of Stones Bordeaux

    by gwened Written Jun 7, 2013

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    pont de pierre over the river garonne in Bordeaux,,
    The bridge of stone, built on the orders of Napoleon I between 1810-1822, was designed by engineers Claude Deschamps and Jean-Baptiste Basilides Billaudel. 4,000 workers there worked. With a length of 487 meters, the bridge presents 17 arches built on 16 pylons. The width of the bridge, originally of 14.6 metres, has been extended to 19 metres in 1954. The bridge is built of stone and brick, with the particularity of contain empty spaces.

    The bridge of stone is linkj to city center Bordeaux by the cours Victor Hugo ,and the place Bir-Hakeim with the porte de Bourgogne at the neighborhood of Bastide by the place Stalingrad and avenue Thiers.

    work is expected by 2014 to 2015 so circulation will be closed. However, its one of the nice landmarks of the city. I love to drive on it, and go over the tracks now done for the tramway!

    pont de pierre over the river Garonne
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    Bordeaux in Moscow

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Mar 18, 2012

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    I (and you) may refresh our memory about Bordeaux even without leaving Moscow. We should go to the Main Building of the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts and see a plaster cast of Apostles from St Andre Church in Bordeaux.

    Every time I visited this museum since my childhood I admired by this masterpiece… Never knew that I would be able to watch it in Bordeaux…

    12 Volkhonka St., Moscow
    (tel.: +7 495 609-95-20, +7 495 697-95-78, +7 495 697-74-12),
    Metro station: "Kropotkinskaya".
    Ticket price for foreign visitors 400 rubles (10 euro) for adults,
    200 rubles for schoolchildren, students and pensioners.
    Attention! Ticket prices for exhibitions might differ from those for permanent collections.
    Visitors are offered audio guides in Russian, English, German, French and Italian.
    Many exciting tours are on offer!

    Open daily from 10 am to 7 pm
    Thursdays from 10 am to 9 pm
    Closed Monday

    Apostles
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    Reserve Naturellle - Marias de Bruge

    by Roadquill Written Jul 28, 2011

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    Located roughly 8-10 Km North of Bordeaux, there is a natural reserve and protected habitat. Even bicycles are not permitted once inside. Open between 10 and and 18:00, it is serene place for viewing wildlife.

    Reserve Naturelle = Marias de Bruge
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    Le Lac

    by Roadquill Written Jul 23, 2011

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    Approximately 4 KM from the city center is Le Lac, a small lake with swimming, boating and other recreational activities, including a sand volleyball area. Set among pine trees, it is a nice place to relax or picnic. I reached it via a short bicycle ride, but Tram C takes you to within a hundred yards.

    Le Lac at Bordeaux
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    'Square Vinet' Green Wall

    by aaaarrgh Updated Jul 7, 2007

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    Bordeaux has a very unusual and delightful hidden corner - square Vinet - which has a planted 'green wall' around its border. Unusual plants grow out of small pockets in the walls, creating a long vertical garden. The walls were designed by botanist Patrick Blanc. There is seating and a small childrens playground in the square.

    I read a brief mention of this unique green space andd fortunately it was not too difficult to find, at the junction of rue Vinet and rue du Cancera, in the Saint Pierre district.

    Open 7am to 8pm but the wall is always visible through the railings

    green space
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    Dunes de Pyla

    by barryg23 Updated Jan 18, 2007

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    The Dunes de Pyla are found in nearby Arcachon and if you intend going to see them it's worthwhile bringing a map. Arcachon is about half-an-hour's train ride from Bordeaux and the Dunes are located just outside Arcachon.

    Susan - 'navigator' for the day had visited them many years back on a student exchange and she thought she could remember the way.

    After almost two hours of walking in search of these elusive Dunes, she realised she had no idea where they were. We passed this pretty Church (see picture) after about 2 hours walking and then stopped for lunch at a cool road-side shop. As the beach was across the road we decided to quit searching for the Dunes and instead go swimming. Some day I will return, with a map, and find these Dunes. They'd better be good:)

    Church in Arcachon
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