Daglan Travel Guide

  • Daglan Street
    Daglan Street
    by Beausoleil
  • Placette des Secrets beside the Church in Daglan
    Placette des Secrets beside the Church...
    by Beausoleil
  • Daglan Hat Shop
    Daglan Hat Shop
    by Beausoleil

Daglan Things to Do

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    Eglise St. Martin in Daglan 3 more images

    by Beausoleil Updated Oct 31, 2013

    We walk through a town and enter nearly anything public that is open. Churches are particularly attractive because they have been the heart of the community for a thousand years or more. We often find great art (and not-so-great art), beautiful stained glass, have been treated to musical performances including rehearsals, walked into weddings and funerals (and been welcomed and thanked for coming). A church is also a quiet place to rest and on a hot summer day, guaranteed to be cool. Most of all they are generally beautiful and peaceful . . . two positives.

    When you visit a church, be aware that it is a place of worship and conduct yourself accordingly. Skimpy clothing is not suitable, loud talking not appreciated, flash bulbs generally forbidden and don't take photos during services. If you are already in the church and a wedding (or funeral) starts, stay out of everyone's way (and sight if possible) and act with great respect.

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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    Placette des Secrets beside the Church in Daglan 1 more image

    by Beausoleil Written Apr 20, 2012

    There are the little places you find by happenstance. We circled the church in Daglan and came upon this hidden garden that was small but charming.

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    Laverie in Daglan 2 more images

    by Beausoleil Written Apr 20, 2012

    Women of the village used to get together at the village laverie and do their laundry together while exchanging gossip and news. Not too many of these laveries have survived and the ones that have are worth a visit. They are usually on or near a stream or river so tend to be in picturesque locations. We were impressed with the laverie in Daglan because the water was the clearest we've ever seen at a laverie. The water was so clear that you can't tell there is water there in my photos.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Photography

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Daglan Restaurants

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    Restaurant Le Petit Paris in Daglan 2 more images

    by Beausoleil Updated Apr 20, 2012

    This isn't a real review because we haven't eaten here. We were visiting the town to take photos that we wanted to paint when we got home a month later. We had been very impressed by the photos of Michel Chanaud of Sarlat and although we didn't have his luck with weather, the town was completely lovely and when you paint, you can change the weather. We had a lovely sunny day and that's good for touring which is what we were doing that day.

    I have a friend who lives nearby in the Dordogne and Le Petit Paris was one of the restaurants she strongly recommended. We looked for it, found and photographed it, but it was early morning and it was not yet open. Hence, we haven't eaten here. However, our friend and many of her friends all say it is an experience not to be missed . . . so next time, we'll visit at lunch or dinner time.

    Favorite Dish: Check the web site (French only) for the menu. There is a fixed-price menu of 26 or 29 euros that looks excellent. There is a carte of 41 euros that looks excellent but intimidating. I'm not sure we could eat all of that food in one sitting. At any rate, there are good menu choices, local foie gras, meats and produce and the setting is charming. There is outdoor seating for nice weather.

    Plan time for a stroll around the lovely village. It's one of the prettiest villages in the area and we didn't see any other tourists although people must find this place. It is so beautiful.

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    • Food and Dining

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Daglan Shopping

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    Paintings on the 8 �� Huit store in Daglan 2 more images

    by Beausoleil Written Apr 20, 2012

    8 à Huit is the French equivalent to 7-Eleven. It's open from 8 AM to 8 PM and is a small grocery store that has everything the casual traveler could need. If there is a 8 à Huit in the village, we know we can survive our rental week without problem. Some are better than others, but they all take care of necessities.

    The outstanding feature of the 8 à Huit in Daglan is that it is pretty and fits into the town so nicely. You will seldom see a more attractive grocery store. The fact that it sells milk, cereal, cheese, wine, fruit & vegetables, toothpaste, etc. is even better.

    The town also has a butcher shop and a bakery along with a cafe and one gourmet restaurant. All your needs are addressed in this lovely village. (Check the hat shop!)

    There are artisan shops too but we were too early for any to be open so that's something for another visit.

    What to buy: If you're looking for specialties, I'd try local wine, cheese, sausages and foie gras. Vegetables and fruits vary by season and will be excellent. I'd go up the street to the boulangerie for my bread just because groceries usually only have one daily delivery so the boulangerie would be more fresh.

    What to pay: Prices tend to be the same as at home if you buy local products. If you want imported Coca Cola or French's mustard, expect to pay a premium price. Buy local.

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    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture

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