Local traditions and culture in Aquitaine

  • caserne Bernadotte entrance
    caserne Bernadotte entrance
    by gwened
  • Caves de Jurançon
    Caves de Jurançon
    by gwened
  • bottling labels corking automated
    bottling labels corking automated
    by gwened

Most Viewed Local Customs in Aquitaine

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    La Boutique du Pélerin, SJ Pied de Port

    by gwened Written Aug 26, 2014

    could be in shopping but such a stron tradition of coming here for things needed for the way to Santiago the store has become a reference for many and a must stop for all.

    32 rue de la citadelle , this is the main inner city street and cannot missed it coming from the citadelle on your left hand side. Open every day from 7h to 19h.

    for contact other site associated with it is
    http://www.directioncompostelle.com/directioncompostelle/contact.php

    and lots more link to help the Walker arrive safe at Santiago
    http://www.directioncompostelle.com/directioncompostelle/partenaires.html

    Have a good safe trip.

    La Boutique du P��lerin
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    the park by place Floquet, SJ Pied de Port

    by gwened Written Aug 26, 2014

    This is a nice small park on an overview of the city, behind it are amusement parks folks and to the side is the covered market.

    The square we use for our picnics while looking down of the folks, and many locals came here too for there is a children playground and a nice fountain.

    Just a leisure way to see the town and even a wedding passing by ::)

    top of park place Floquet to town/Mountains fountain by park at Place Floquet top park place Floquet wedding! Place Floquet to inner city playground at park in Place Floquet
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    The leyend of Saint Grat, Oloron Sainte Marie

    by gwened Written Aug 24, 2014

    Recently a sculpture by the city from Pierre Castillou was enacted just behind the Cathedral of Sainte Marie.

    but here is the story briefly a la gwened ::)

    You have a plaque of the story of the Saint Grat, where it said, the bishop of Oloron died in Jaca (Aragon,Spain) in the 6C and both the Aragonese and Béarnaise argued over keeping the body. To settle this issue they chose a mule at the col de Somport (the mountain passage we took and divide the countries) to see which direction the mule will take as it was blind. The blind mule carry the body all the way to the steps of the Cathedral of Sainte Marie in Oloron Sainte Marie, end of dispute.

    nice at Oloron Sainte Marie.

    statue sculpture of Saint Grat back  Sainte Marie plaque behind Cathedral with the story St Grat
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    jardin public of Oloron Sainte Marie

    by gwened Written Aug 24, 2014

    a garden with a nice music kiosk and fountain , nice place to relax. However, also, a place to remember those Fallen for us, plenty of plaques, statues, busts and monument to the Fallen in it.

    it is off the main city center on your way to Sainte Marie Cathedral. It was done in 1898. ¨Passed by here many times over the years but finally with the family a chance to take pictures and post a tip ::)

    The local families come here for leisure,and events of the city as well as commémorations are done here too. A nice break from a visit day of sightseeing.

    translating from the city page in no 3 here,
    This garden of rectangular shape, spread over 2.8 hectares.

    The axis of the garden provides a perspective from the pont Sainte-Claire. In the center of the public garden, a Bandstand kiosk enthroned in the middle of a circular space. A single jet fountain has been realized, and next to it a children playground.

    In 1925, the column of the Memorial was inaugurated. It was performed on the plans of the architect Geisse, who worked at the same time on the construction of the Notre-Dame church. Over time, the public garden had some adjustments. But it retains its vocation as place to walk in the heart of the city. It hosts also many events, including concerts & spectacles; performances in summer quarters, or even fair to animals, the feast of associations and the Garburade in September, and the animations of Christmas around the ice skating rink.

    nice.

    entrance to Jardin Public the music kiosk at center of garden plaque on tree of rememberance WWI monument to the resistance and deportation monument to fallen just by entran to jardin public
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    Caves de Jurançon at Gan

    by gwened Written Aug 23, 2014

    This could be a things to do too, but since it relates to a historical cellar cooperative of wines very special to this region I am posting it here.

    the caves de Jurançon is awesome, unique product ,local and very French, well basque/béarnaise could be more ::)

    We knew there was an open house on August 14th at Gan with the Caves des Jurançon a wine we had drank before many times but never at the spot so took a ride here and spend the day great folks,great location, and great wines. The Caves de Jurançon is at the town of Gan just South of Pau on the N134 and follow direction Gan Centre, you will hit the caves.

    We arrive early but enough to have them all set up and ready to go. Ample free parking as the Caves occupies spaces on both sides of Avenue Henri IV in Gan. We went to the main tent right in front of the receiving of grapes store. There was music groups playing French and Basque/Béarnaise music, a beret throwing contest (beret is the hat of the basque) , the store was fully open and staff ready to go.

    We went Inside with a guide Julien , who was fantastic, we exchange lots of questions and he was right on right away no hesitation real pro. The building is where they have the process of receiving grapes from the coopératives that are members of the cave, 660 hectares are own by them and about 40 is own direct by the Cave. The grapes are separated along the two main grapes gros manseng and petit manseng for the whites dry and moelloux or sweet sort of they go from dry to late vendage very sweet, they also do rosé and red wines from coopératives in other regions of Aquitaine. They are blend it base on the master winemaker decision base on quality.

    We then, took the ride on a petit train or little train into the back of the building where huge aluminum tanks stored the juice for fermetation and treatment. And we ran across with the little train to see the building across the street where they do the filling, labeling ,and packaging of the wines with special computised machines including a robot that does 6000 bottles per hour. The place hold about 80 full time employees and the automation has not decrease the number. They ship 10% international and 30% to individuals another 30% to small stores mom and pop places and 30% to big distribution.

    The process is very computerized and very clean, all the personnel spoked with us very nicely, and very willing to explain their processes. Once the trip was done we headed back to the main Platform where grapes are received for a free tastings of all their lineup of wines!! Of course, we tasted them all!!! It was great the lady was very nice and we were serve sausages,and cheese to eat along the way. You were given a list with prices and another pamphlet with the wines and matching suggestions.

    After all this process and wandering about the place we headed for the boutique store for purchases. We already had our price list completed with the wines we wanted, handed it over and they do all the packaging for you. We purchase two cases of different wines for my cellar ::) and we did said goodbye to all, a wonderful day the best so far and very friendly folks: makes you come back for more….

    Caves de Juran��on bottling labels corking automated the cellars for ready to go unlabel wines filling bottle station the warehouse where is prepared and ship
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    see vinyards of médoc from Bordeaux

    by gwened Updated Nov 15, 2013

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    i never take tours, so can only tells you is much better on your own. they have walking section to guide you on your own;the vinyards are done by bus from st jean train station to pauillac.i go there by car.

    there is the tram C to aubiers and then bus 705 to pauillac, 2 hrs trip. you can trace the trajects here in French
    http://transgironde.gironde.fr/ri/?rub_code=4

    maison du vins de margaux great great grandaughter of Baron Haussmann,Paris the great Cos d'Estournel St Est��phe
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    wine tours or visits to St Emilion

    by gwened Written Dec 24, 2012

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    AHH having too much red from the medoc forgot you mentioned st emilion, gamay base wines; the tours there are cheaper with
    http://www.taxi-lussac-winetour-stemilion.com/
    again never taken them, I drive on my own.

    other tours from the tourist office of St Emilion are
    http://www.saint-emilion-tourisme.com/uk/que-faire.html?idcat=4&idfiche=37

    and on your own, assuming you have no car, (pitty), you can get there from Bordeaux in little over an hour by tram A to Cenon and train from there to St Emilion, schedules here
    http://transgironde.gironde.fr/

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    Watch a corrida

    by kokoryko Updated Feb 2, 2008

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    “Death in the afternoon” is a book by Ernest Hemingway, not a novel but impressions and descriptions of the corrida world in Spain in the twenties. This book is an excellent introduction to corrida and all the people who live their aficion with passion. The world has changed, the look of the western world at this custom also; but this custom is very live in Spain and in Southern France. If you are “a priori “against bull fighting, be prepared to see some cruel images here, and do not see sadism, voyeurism or things like that; I do not promote corrida, it is just an account on a local custom.
    Let us have a very short look at this custom (Ah you may read a longer introduction in my illustrated thoughts travelogue, if you came here directly on this page).
    The corrida begins at “la cinco de la tarde” (5 in the afternoon, six now, with the summer time schedule) with the paseo, where all actors (except the bulls!) are presented in a parade in the arena, with music like the Pepita Creus paso doble. The main actors are the matadores (killers), then come the peones (helpers) who are toreros (they play with the bi-coloured cloth like the matador and there are banderilleros), then the picadores (riders with a lance), then the cleaners and other helpers.
    They are all leaded by the Alguazils (representatives) who will get the keys of the toril (the place where the bulls are locked) from the organisers who symbolically throw a key the riding Alguazil must catch.
    Six bulls will be killed by the three matadors in a usual corrida de toros.

    The tourist offices in Landes or Pyrenees Atlantiques give information for corridas.
    It can be expensive for big corridas like in Mont de Marsan, Dax, Bayonne. . . from 10 to 100 Euros depending the seats high in the sun is the cheapest, low ion the shade is the most expensive.

    Paseo; the toreros Paseo, the other staff paseo; the undertakers Alguazil bringing the key of the toril El picador, concentrating before the fight
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    Small graveyards

    by Mique Updated Dec 14, 2007

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    In not too distant times protestants weren´t allowed to be buried in the village graveyards. Therefore you can see everywhere really small graveyards. Often on private property. The one that is on the property of my parents contains 4 graves. An old man comes a few times per year to attend them. He himself is around 70 and his grandparents and great/grandparents are buried there.

    Nowadays, you can´t be buried anymore in on of those tiny graveyards. But , if you see one, you now know why they´re there..

    Protestant graveyard
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    After and around

    by kokoryko Written Aug 7, 2007

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    The sixth bull is dead, near the entrance, the toreros share their “emotions” of the afternoon, they meet their fans and prepare to go back to Spain for a new corrida.
    I am not sure they are really happy, looking at their faces when they come out from the arena;
    There is a chapel in the arena (picture 3) and they make a short stop there before the corrida (I am not sure the Virgin agrees with what they do), before looking closely to the death (even of an animal). You can see on the left side of the statuette a poster with the insignia (arms) of the ganaderos (bull breeders) who sell their bulls for the corridas of this year’s corridas; right, above the entrance is the insignia of the bulls of the day. On picture 4 the matador has a chat with his apodadero (impresario; I do not invent it, it is really him, with the blue scarf) and the peones.
    And the hero of the day is just taken to the slaughterhouse. . . . (last picture), anonymously. . . . and all is cleaned very quickly. . . Tomorrow, “The sun also rises”. . . . . , and a new corrida will take place.

    What is he thinking about? And he? Chapel for the killers. Telling about emotions of the afternoon Adios
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    It is all over.

    by kokoryko Written Aug 7, 2007

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    The sword is deep in his neck, the peones make him turn, he will soon fall. The “undertakers team comes then with the mules to tug the bull away ; looking at the face of the mule driver, he seems not exactly happy of what he does, but who knows what he thinks?
    The matador made a “good job” and salutes the public who makes a standing ovation.
    Sincerely, I do not know what the public feels deeply; there are certainly all sorts of people, sadists, people coming to see cornadas and why not the death of a matador, many people go by tradition, more or less, and there are real aficionados, who know what happens, know the technical and artistic things happening down there. Is the public happy for the “performance”, or happy to have seen a drama, happy only to see a fight in a sports sense, happy to see an animal suffer and die, forgetting their everyday bothers, well a bit all of this probably. . . . I wrote in the travelogue I felt bad, not by sentimentality, after all, it is an animal, and I go to the butcher’s, but I hate to see useless suffering, and I like this kind or animals. (my parents offered me a heifer on a birthday when I was a kid, and it became a cow, and I took care many years of that animal; ah, I had no teddy bear or bear I could take with me everywhere and as a companion or confident)

    It is finished Making space for another one. . . The chief undertaker La vuelta del matador The public. . . greeting el matador
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    La faena (continued)

    by kokoryko Written Aug 7, 2007

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    The toro is exhausted, the “natural” passes are slower, and the bull, after, does almost not anymore “want” to fight and the matador, turns his back to the bull, demonstrating his domination on the animal; Then comes the sword; it is a pathetic time, as all will be finished very soon; it is also, by the way the most dangerous moment for the matador, as he has to be close to the bull and from face; great matadors died from cornadas (hits by the horn) at this very moment. I show it only from far. The killing can be “clean” but also sometimes the matador has to make several tries, which is really difficult to bear, and it makes a bad conclusion to a faena.

    Natural from the back (I forgot the name) Exhausted! El Matador If he misses. . . . The last seconds. . .
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    Tercio Tres, la faena

    by kokoryko Written Aug 7, 2007

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    During the faena, the matador guides the bull with the muleta, a red cloth, hanging on a stick and the sword.
    During the first part of this phase the matador shows his “skills” to guide the bull, make him fight in rhythm, make him build a sort of a death choregraphy; if it is good, the music plays. At the beginning, the bull is still strong and runs fast, jumps, charges quickly (first pictures), then he goes slower, the matador makes figures sometimes kneeing (picture 4) and makes him turn around him, slowly, almost quiet and peaceful (picture 5).
    The bull fighting for nothing, gets soon exhausted and then comes the last part of the faena, the death of the bull (next tip).

    Still in mood Una natural This way ! On the knees Turning the macabre paso doble
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    Tercio Dos

    by kokoryko Written Aug 7, 2007

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    Now comes the cavalry, with the picadores. The bull is “guided at the right moment to the horse which it charges; the picador pushes his lance in the neck of the animal who does not leave pressure if he is “brave”. This cruel operation is mainly (in tauromachic technical vision) intended the test the bravery of the bull and the weaken him, particularly his neck. There is a crosspiece on the lance which prevents it to deepen further than 15 cm, in order not to kill the bull immediately. . . . The bleeding begins. . . .
    Then come the banderilleros who will pick their banderillas (wooden sticks with harpoon shaped iron heads) on the neck of the bull. It is a very spectacular (and dangerous) operation where the toreros need skill and speed. Well, it is a really sporty, adrenaline generating thing, but, cruel, exciting the bull, animating him for fighting. On the last picture, the bull is “ready” for the faena, the most important part of the corrida, in tercio tres.

    Brave against the picador (look at the bent spear) Under the pique Banderillero calling the bull. Well done!(aehm, for the ones who like!)
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    Tercio Uno

    by kokoryko Written Aug 7, 2007

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    Six bulls will be fought in the afternoon; the corrida lasts for 2 hours, so each bull has about 20 minutes to live when he comes in the arena.
    For each bull the fight is divided into three thirds (tercios): entrance of the bull and testing the bull with the capa, the wide pink and yellow cloth. If the bull is willing, and the skill full torero, makes him run, turn around him with veronicas and gaoneras, the most current “passes” of this phase. This Tercio Uno is generally short and finishes with a trumpet music announcing Tercio Dos.

    Entering with A veronica A Gaonera Guiding the bull Arriba toro!
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