Margaux Travel Guide

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    by black_mimi99 Written Aug 7, 2009

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    The origins of Chateau Palmer lie in the Gascq estate, which predates it by several centuries. The Gascq family were an influential Bordeaux dynasty that not only held sway over an impressive estate.

    Chateau Palmer is one of a large collection - ten in all - of third growth properties located in Margaux. In terms of sheer quality Palmer leads this pack by a length, producing wine of such a high standard that it frequently wipes the floor with the Margaux second growths.

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    by black_mimi99 Written Aug 7, 2009

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    The origins of Labégorce lie in a large estate in the northern parts of the commune of Margaux which belonged to the Gorce (or Gorsse) family, perhaps as long ago as the 14th Century.

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    by black_mimi99 Written Aug 7, 2009

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    The vineyard of Château Dauzac stretches over 40 hectares of deep gravel soil, overlooking the river, in the Margaux Appellation. The first appearance of vines at Dauzac apparently dates back to the XIIIth century, but it was not until the arrival of Thomas Michael Linch in 1740 that the estate assumed today's dimensions and that Dauzac appears in the 1855 "Classement officiel". Ernest David, then Régisseur of Dauzac and Ducru Beaucaillou, has gone down in history, along with the celebrated scientist Alexis Millardet, for having perfected a prophylactic mixture of quicklime and copper sulfate against mildew. Dauzac was the veritable birthplace, in 1885, of the "Bouillie bordelaise". The soil here is unique: surface gravel, clay or calcareous subsoil, and "alios", iron hardpan. Vines send their roots deep, seeking the elements which give Médoc wines their unique quality. On the hillsides of the Médoc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot grapes produce perhaps the world's finest red wines.

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