Fun things to do in Bayeux

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    Musee de la Bataille de Normandie

    by vichatherly Updated Aug 10, 2013

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    As Bayeux was the first town liberated and protected a special museum was established to describe the Battle of Normandy between June 7th and August 29th.

    This is an excellent museum, with a good 25 minute film telling the story, not only of the D-Day landings, but the whole of the battle of Normandy.

    A charge is made, discounted with a Normandie Pass.

    Musee de la Bataille de Normandie
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    Liberation Memorial - General De Gaulle Visit

    by vichatherly Written Jul 30, 2013

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    You'll find this striking bas relief, sculptured by M Lamourdedieu on one of the roundabouts of Bayeux.

    It commemorates the D-Day landings and the visit of General De Gaulle on 14th June 1944.

    In the centre there is a flame, which is lit each September by young people from Eindhoven. The two towns are twinned as Eindhoven, like Bayeux in France, was the first major city to be liberated in Holland.

    I have now been to both sites.

    Liberation Memorial Liberation Memorial Liberation Memorial Liberation Memorial
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    Looking for flowers in Bayeux

    by Toshioohsako Updated Aug 23, 2012

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    Look for flowers in Bayeux. Bauty is where flowers are. You may find them in the windows of a house, on river side, and in the Cathedral. No matter where flowers are, they embrace objects with beauty nature and dreamy fragrance.

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    What most people come to see

    by rexvaughan Written May 2, 2012

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    Probably most people who have ever even heard of Bayeux did so in conjunction with its largest tourist attraction, the Bayeux Tapestry which was made to commemorate the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. Legend has it that it was made by William the Conqueror’s wife, Mathile, but most scholars doubt this. Whoever made it, it is an amazing piece of work, some 230 feet long and intricately embroidered with 50 scenes from the invasion and the Battle of Hastings including the death of Harold.
    The tapestry originally was housed in the Cathedral which was built by William’s half-brother, Odo who was the Bishop of Bayeux. Some speculate that Odo commissioned the tapestry and used it at the dedication of the cathedral in the decade following the conquest of England. Odo went with William and was made Earl of Kent, so had a lot invested in the venture and gained a good bit of wealth for the cathedral (and maybe himself?) from it.
    It is now housed in the Musée de la Tapisserie de Bayeux. It is well displayed and there is a very good audio-guide which steps you through the events and the characters portrayed.

    The museum is open pretty much every day from 9:00 until about 18:00.

    Adult admission is 7.80 Euros for adults and about half for children. Under age 10 is free.

    Main entrance to the museum Replica of one of the boats used in the invasion Pretty fierce looking guy!
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    Treat Yourself To A Great Guide

    by RoscoeGregg Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I have read every book I could about the Normandy invasion. I am better than average with a map. So I felt well prepared to find my own way as I toured Normandy. After just a few hours it became clear that I was going to miss many of the things that I wanted to see because Normandy I huge and the places that I really wanted to see were small and very specific. Add the kicker that many sites are privately held and restricted to guided tours. So I luckily found a great guide in Dale Booth.

    He was smart, very well prepared, approachable, super knowledgeable and energetic. He draws on a life time of study, personal contact with many veterans of Normandy and years of guiding experience. I used him for two days and was very satisfied. He took me to many sites that I would simply been unable to find. He quickly and expertly put things into context and filled in details with accurate information. He was very approachable and welcomed any and all questions.

    I am a bit of a cheepo and it was hard to part with the guide fee. In retrospect I have no regrets. I know that I had a much more meaning full time in Normandy because of using this guide.

    Dale gives another spirited talk Importance of the fight for this spot explained Dale's sand drawing of the Sword Beach Defences Dale setting the secene the assult on a battery A path that many never returned on
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    Mulberries

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    "Mulberries" are artificial harbors created at Arromanches (Gold Beach) and St Laurent (Omaha Beach). These artificial harbors were conceived because the Germans knew the Allies would need a deep-water port to move troops and supplies inland... therefore, the Germans heavily defended all of the major ports. The Mulberries were constructed by the Allies to allow them to attack less defended areas, then create artificial harbors to enable movement of the critical wartime supplies as needed. The Mulberries consisted of sunken ships and concrete blocks to act as breakwaters, along with floating piers for unloading the ships.

    Parts of the Mulberry at Arromanches are still visible in the water around the town.

    Mulberry at Gold Beach (Arromanches)

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    Take Stroll Along The Canal

    by RoscoeGregg Updated Feb 28, 2011

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    The center of Bayeux is Bisected with a canal. All along it’s edge there are wonderful paths. It is traffic free and is very peaceful. There are parks, gardens and benches all along the way. There are some old mill works to view. It is ripe with romance and photographic opportunity.

    So get out and walk about during your stay. It will be one of the highlights of your stay.

    How cool is this? A nice view Some of the old millworks A wide spot in the path The canal path
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    Shopping is more fun in a street market

    by Beausoleil Written Feb 10, 2010

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    We were renting an apartment south of Caen and our landlady told us not to miss the market in Bayeux on Saturday morning. It was her favorite. So Saturday morning we dutifully breakfasted and drove to Bayeux. It was not hard to find the market. We simply went the opposite direction of all the people carrying away bags of various things.

    The market was wonderful. They had fresh produce, wonderful cheeses, flowers, clothes, table linens, furniture and people all over the place. Our apartment came with a gardener who delivered fresh produce so we limited ourselves to cheeses at the market. We hadn't intended to buy anything but as we walked by one cheese monger, she cheerfully asked if we knew what a certain cheese tasted like. We answered, no, so she insisted we must try it for the experience. Well . . . it was so good we bought some of that and then slices of several others. Normandy is a great place to explore cheese!

    Shopping redefined - Bayeux Saturday morning Bayeux Saturday morning market Bayeux Saturday morning market Bayeux Saturday morning market
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    Point du Hoc

    by malianrob Written Jan 23, 2010

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    By the time we made it here to Point du Hoc it was freezing and rainning pretty hard. It was interesting to see where the Germans were bunkered. Germans positioned long range guns which they aimed at passing ships from this point. The allies suffered huge losses as the Germans fired down upon them from the cliffs but eventually secured the area, finding that all the long range guns had been moved just days before to Calais in expectation of an Allied attack further along the coast.

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    Normandy American Cemetery

    by malianrob Updated Jan 23, 2010

    Since planning my trip to Paris I really wanted to go to the Dday beaches. I am really glad I did. It was emotional but also very inspiring. We did a day trip out here and it was so worth it. The Normandy American Cemetery is overlooking Omaha Beach and the English Channel. It is so peaceful and quiet here that it is hard to imagine that a war took place here.

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    Bayeux British & Commonwealth Cemetery

    by vichatherly Updated Jul 13, 2009

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    This is the largest British WWII cemetery in France. It contains over 4,000 graves - 3,395 from the United Kingdom.

    The place is beautifully maintained and is a peaceful spot to walk around with your thoughts. I think it is important to visit these places and to walk up and down the rows of crosses. To lose so many young people is the price that was paid for our freedom today.

    I always try and walk down rows which I think haven't been walked down for a while. We visited just after the 65th anniversary of D-Day and so saw the recently laid wreath from Prince Charles.

    Across the road is the Commonwealth War Graves Commission memorial.

    Bayeux British & Commonwealth Cemetery Bayeux British & Commonwealth Cemetery Prince Charles' Wreath Bayeux Brit & Com Cemetery Bayeux British & Commonwealth Cemetery Bayeux British & Commonwealth Cemetery
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    World War II's Gold Beach

    by Ewingjr98 Updated May 18, 2009

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    Gold Beach, in the area around the village of Arromanches. is mostly low and flat with houses built right up to the edge of the water. Outside of town, there are many steep cliffs that British Commando units scaled on the morning of the invasion of Normandy in World War II.

    Arromanches, France

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  • You won't get bored in Bayeux !

    by GringoGeol Updated Jul 19, 2008

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    There is PLENTY to see in and around Bayeux, even wthout a car. The town is very compact, inside the Ring Road ("Le By-Pass" to the locals), approx 1 X 2 km in size. And, contrary to popular myth, the locals are VERY friendly !

    For art nuts, the guidebook (get one free at any large shop) lists the Musee Baron Gerard (porcelain and lace paintings), two lace-making workshops, a china-porcelain workshop,and a tapestry-stitching workshop. Also interesting exterior architecture on numerous old buildings, to say nothing of the Bayeux Tapestry. You can get by public transport (inquire at Tourist Office or Hotel Churchill) to Avranches and Mont St-Michel (a must-see), where the Avranches museum has 100 medieval illuminated manuscripts from Mt. St-M.

    There are many shops selling grocs, cheese, breads, wine, cider, etc in Bayeux on Rue Larcher-Rue Foch just behind the Cathedral. Many inexpensive sidewalk cafes on Rue St-Jean going east from the River. Be sure to drink plenty of apple cider, a Normandy specialty, better than beer. Also, Camembert cheese in made in the nearby town of that name.

    Good place to stay - the "Manoir a Pont Rouge", 2 km south of the Cathedral, in St. Loup Hors. It's a British-run B&B, in a 1700's manor house, charming and relatively inexpensive. See posts on VirtualTourist.com about it.

    Not interested in WW II ? You WILL be, after taking one of the fascinating tours offered by www.Battlebus.fr These are designed for everyday tourists, not militaria buffs, and are ABSOLUTELY FASCINATING AND INSPIRING.

    Enjoy !

    Guide explaining D-Day happenings on Omaha Beach.

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    Everybody Visits the Bayeux Tapestry

    by hquittner Written Dec 4, 2007

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    An embroidery of course but the oldest large piece of material you will ever see. After barely surviving for almost 750 years Napoleon and subsequent enlightened others have protected it and after surviving two WW it is now protected even from thoughtless photographers. (We have suggestions about a visit under Warnings!). It is almost certain that it was commissioned from an English workshop by Bishop Odo (Eudes) of Bayeux, half-brother and comrade in arms of William after the victory at Hastings and was definitely hung along the cathedral nave at its dedication (1077). (The egocentric Bishop appears by name and figure at least twice in the story, among the rarely named minor characters). We have decided on 5 scenes from the story: 1) Harold and William meet with English King Edward who tells them that Harold should succeed him. 2) Harold goes ahunting in Brittany and is captured by its Duke; as his now
    vassal he helps in maneuvers near Mont St-Michel rescuing a fighter from the quicksand; he is soon ceded to William who releases him to return to England when he declares fealty to William. 3) King Edward dies and is buried in Westminster Abbey. Harold becomes King (breaking his oath). Preparations for the invasion and the battle then follow. 4) During the battle William's men are in panic from rumors that he is killed. He takes off his helmet and rallies them. 5) Harold is killed.

    King Edward with Harold and William Harold's Heroism at Mont St.-Michel (left top) King Edward's Death Harold's Death William Reveals Himself to His Men
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    Lace from Bayeux in Hotel du Doyen

    by Pavlik_NL Written Nov 26, 2007

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    Inside the magnificent mansion Hotel du Doyen, next to the cathedral Notre Dame in Bayeux, one of it's old handwork guildes still is alive in the conservatory of Bayeux lace. These fine textile handworks, in early medieval times an art that was especially present in centres of trade like the upcoming towns and cities in North Western Europe (Flanders, Holland, North-Western-France and Normandy). Up to today this art is embraced by tourists and in Bayeux this resulted in a active group that maintain a museum, as well as give workshops and courses. More information on their webpages.

    The monumental gates to Hotel du Doyen Other gate to a monumental mansion in Bayeux

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