Caen Things to Do

  • Men's Abbey + Church
    Men's Abbey + Church
    by darkjedi
  • Caen castle
    Caen castle
    by Pod
  • Caen castle.
    Caen castle.
    by Pod

Most Recent Things to Do in Caen

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    Visit the World War II Cemetery and Memorial

    by Beausoleil Updated Jan 20, 2014

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    An unknown soldier
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    The American Cemetery at Omaha Beach is outside of Colleville-sur-Mer but a good base for visiting is the nearby city of Caen. You can combine the visit to the Cemetery with a visit to the Caen Peace Memorial and nearby Pegasus Bridge with the small museum and river walk there. It's a pretty intense day. If you don't have a car, there are tours available to various WWII sites and you can choose one to suit your time and your budget. Check at the local tourist office for prices and schedules. If you have a car, it would be more pleasant to stay at Bayeux and visit the WWII sites from there. Bayeux is a charming smaller town with an excellent market, historic cathedral and, most famous, the Bayeux Tapestry. Official Caen Web Site with D-Day Tours

    This is a very intense experience although in the end, we found it very peaceful. I think one should visit if for no other reason than to remain aware of the cost of war.

    There are cemeteries for all the countries who fought in that area and you may want to visit some of them too. We stayed near a Canadian Cemetery south of Caen and it was very peaceful and lovely there.

    I've created a Colleville-sur-Mer page on Virtual Tourist that you can also check. Click on the link. Colleville-sur-Mer by Beausoleil

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    Pegasus Bridge near Caen

    by Beausoleil Updated Apr 29, 2013

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    The Benouville-Pegusus Bridge is a must-see if you are visiting World War II sites. Pegasus, the flying horse, was the emblem of the 6th British Airborne Division and they captured the bridge on June 6, 1944 thus maintaining a vital transportation link for the Allies.

    It's a drawbridge and it's fun to see it go up and down. It is also on the beautiful river Orne. It is a very peaceful place today and you wll see ducks swimming on the river and men fishing there.

    There is a Memorial on one side of the river that is worth a visit. It is not open in January. Check the web site listed below for hours at other times. Official Web Site of Pegasus Bridge

    See other photos by clicking on the photograph

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    The Caen Peace Memorial

    by Beausoleil Updated Apr 29, 2013

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    Caen Peace Memorial
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    When you get your ticket, take the option for full lunch in the restaurant. The museum is large and emotionally draining (all that war and violence) so you need a break and the food is excellent.

    You start down a curving ramp . . . descending into the horrors of war symbolically, starting with the ending of World War I, the Great Depression and “The Failure of Peace.”

    You progress through “France in the Dark Years” including both collaboration and resistance. There is a stirring film on the Battle of Britain. This is followed by “World War–Total War” including a film on the siege of Stalingrad.

    Next you go to the theater for “The Battle of Normandy.” The huge screen is split with Allied footage on the left and Axis footage on the right. After that, you go on to another theater for a film about D Day and then are returned to the exhibits. The Hall of Peace is next and had exhibits from many different cultures defining peace. Official Web Site of Caen

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    The Abbey of Women (L'Abbaye-aux-Dames)

    by Beausoleil Updated Apr 29, 2013

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    Eglise de la Trinit�� at the Abbey
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    There are two major abbeys in Caen, one is L'Abbaye-aux-Dames and the other one is (you guessed it) L'Abbaye-aux-Hommes. The Abbey of Saint-Étienne is usually called the Abbey of Men. The two abbeys were built by William the Conqueror and his wife Mathilda. Official Web site of L'Abbaye-aux-Hommes]

    This tip, however, is about the Abbey for Women and there is one special characteristic of it that draws you. You walk out of L'Abbaye-aux-Dames into a beautiful park with lovely views over the city of Caen. If you've been sightseeing all day, it's also a great place to find a park bench and enjoy watching everyone enjoying their park. Highly recommended. Official Web Site of Basse Normandie

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    Wonderful churches in Caen

    by Beausoleil Updated Apr 29, 2013

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    St. Pierre in Caen
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    Directly across the street from the chateau is Eglise St. Pierre. It has a slightly curved apse so is particularly interesting. We had seen this in Quimper in Bretagne but it is very eye-catching when you first see it. Official Web Site of Eglise St. Pierre

    Here is my journal entry for the church:

    "A very friendly docent gave us the cathedral history in French, but spoke slowly so we could understand her. We walked through the cathedral, enjoying it . . . curved apse, shades of Quimper! As we completed our tour, the sun came out and lighted the stained glass windows so the whole church glowed."

    The tower was destroyed during World War II but has been beautifully restored. You will get your best photos from the chateau across the street and up the hill. Great view!

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    The Botanical Gardens (the "Museum of flowers")

    by annase Written Apr 1, 2013
    The lower part
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    The botanical garden of Caen (Jardin botanique de Caen) is built on a terrain of an old stone quarry Caen. One side extraction is still visible. In the lower part is about 5,000 square meters big and hosts flora (1,000 species) typical to Normandy. There is also a medicinal garden with 600 plants; horticultural collections (700 varieties); trees, shrubs and conifers (500 species). The greenhouses and an orangery contain 1500 different plant species, including a banana, a coffee, a vanilla, a camphor, citrus, orchids, cacti, and the giant water lily from South America, Victoria cruziana.

    The upper part of the gardens consists of a public park known for its mosaic cultures (including the famous butterfly emblem garden) and some remarkable trees such as Sophora japonica, dating from 1750, which is 10m high and 4.60 m in circumference; Sequoiadendron giganteum (from 1890, 35 m high), and Cryptomeria japonica (from 1870, 20 m high).

    Beyond the garden's scientific (conservation, introduction, re-introduction of plant species), educational and cultural mission, the botanical garden provides a place to relax for children and families. There is a playground at the furthers concern of the upper part.

    Guided tours for groups on request.
    A disable parking space at the entrance of the park
    Public Toilets accessible for people with disabilities
    Wheelchairs available for use free of charge

    The botanical garden is home to the city's green. It is the origin of "service gardens and plantations," the current "management of the environment and of life." It was created by Jean-Baptiste Callard Ducquerie who in 1689, brought together numerous plants in the garden. In 1803, after the French Revolution, the botanical garden became municipal, and grew by 3.5 hectares. Two large greenhouses were built in 1860, and an orangery was added later. The Botanical Institute was built in 1891. In the small adjacent greenhouse Noël Bernard , Normandian botanist, discovered the phenomenon of symbiosis with fungi of orchids.

    the 1944 bombing destroyed the garden. Louis Bouket, director, undertook the restoration and reconstruction of buildings with the exception of the floor of the Orangerie. New exhibition greenhouses, dedicated to exotic plants, were reconstructed in 1988.

    The award-winning plant collections
    - Peperomia Conservatoire National in 1995, awarded by the French Conservatory of specialized plant collections (Association of the French Conservatory of Specialised Vegetable Collections CCVS).
    - Approved "Botanical Garden of France" in 1997 by the Association of Botanical Gardens of France and francophone countries
    - The Board of Directors of the CCVS awarded the label 'National Collection' to the garden's collections of Peperomia, and Rhipsalis Cryptanthus in 2002,.

    Greenhouses are open every day from 1pm to 5pm. The garden itself is open daily. Free entry.

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    Fine Arts Museum - Musée des Beaux-Arts de Caen

    by annase Updated Apr 1, 2013
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    This museum is located in the heart of the Caen Castle (the medieval castle built by William the Conqueror) in a modern building. The museum has a selection of paintings from the 15th to 20th centuries. Lots of early arts is rather religious in kind. The museum is in fact one of the most important regional French museums, displaying a notable collection of French, Italian, Flemish and Dutch paintings originating from the 16th and 17th centuries, including Cosme Tura, Perugino, Veronese, Tintoretto, Guercino, Giordano, Poussin, Champaigne Rubens, Ruysdael.

    The 18th century is represented through French and Italian portraits and landscapes (eg Rigaud, Headlands, Boucher, Lancret, Tiepolo) while the 19th century unfolds around romantic and realistic paintings by Géricault, Delacroix, Courbet and the Corot and the Barbizon landscapes. The Normandian landscape has functioned as inspiration for Monet (eg Etretat. La Manneporte, reflets sur l'eau (1885))., Boudin, Lebourg, Vuillard, Bonnard, Marquet, and Dufy.

    The 20th century is characterised by French Cubism while contemporary period unfolds around themes such as allegory, space and light (Balthus, Joan Mitchell, Vieira da Silva, Rebeyrolle Debré, Pincemin, Sicilia, Neumann, and Barcelò). Some of this more contemporary stuff is rather disturbing, rather than pleasing and attractive to look at.

    There is also an exceptional collection more than 50,000 prints owned by Mancel Foundation, presented in part in the temporary exhibitions (Callot, Dürer, Rembrandt, Tiepolo, Piranesi). Every year, the museum has a number of temporary exhibitions, which are sometimes displaying old art and contemporary painting, drawing, printmaking, photography.

    The museum is open daily from 9.30am to 6pm, except Tuesday and Bank holidays. There is also a small (and rather uninteresting) sculpture park outdoors which is always accessible for public when the castle grounds are open.

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    Visit a Castle and more.

    by Pod Written Dec 22, 2011

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    Caen castle
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    There's the Castle, Built around 1060 by William the Conqueror to house his residential palace. One of the biggist in Europe. Became a millitary barracks.
    Ramparts. Through the years have been repaired soooo many times and messed about with. Things move and get lost through time. But the dry moat still remains in the same place.

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    Abbaye des Dames, the Women's Abbey

    by Pavlik_NL Updated Apr 4, 2011
    Graceful gates that lead to the women's domain

    Let's not make ourselves guilty of discrimination. When one visits the Abbaye des Hommes (Men's Abbey), then also visit the Abbaye des Dames (Women's Abbey). On the other side of the city centre, a beautiful abbey is next to an even more beautiful church, the Sainte-Trinity. Here too the interior should be not left aside, however this time because often interesting expositions are held in the abbey.

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    The abbey church of the men

    by Pavlik_NL Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Saint Etienne, above the gates to the men's abbey

    Every abbey has it's church. In Caen the Abbaye des hommes (Men's abbey) has it's highlight in the Saint-Etienne, with it's towers rising high above the roofs of the houses in Caen. I just had to seperately mention this most extravagant part of the abbey in this tip.

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    Sainte-Trinity, the curch of the women's abbey

    by Pavlik_NL Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Sainte-Trinity, rising up in all it's glory

    Even more then with the Abbaye des Hommes, the abbey church of the Abbaye des Dames (Women's Abbey) is the masterpiece of the old buildings. The Sainte-Trinity is full of grace and has two towers that are fully decorated with beautiful sculptures and pinnacles. Here too the Normandian Gothic style rules.

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    Inside the castle of Caen

    by Pavlik_NL Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A group touring along the rampards of the castle
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    The terrain of the old castle of the Normandian dukes holds many surprises to the visitor. Besides the museums that I will mention later, there are small gardens (former vegetables and herbes gardens), a playground for children, the castle chapel, remains of the donjon where the dukes lived and several other buildings with a variety of functions. At the ticketoffice in the building at the gate, one can obtain tickets for guided tours around the whole castle interior, during which many details of the building and the history is explained.

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  • Musée d'initiation à la nature

    by dimilag Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Mus��e d'initiation �� la nature

    The museum wich is located in the historic Abbaye aux Hommes built by William the conqueror offers a first step towards discovering the fauna and flora of Normandy. There, you will be able to look at birds of the towns, ducks ans others birds of the ponds and the coastlines. You will learn everything on normand landscapes and natural habitats. Walking through the norman garden, you will recognise the particular busches aud trees of which the norman bedgerows are made, as well as various shrubs, medicinal ans poisonous plants and regional rocks.

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    Eglise Saint Pierre

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Eglise Saint Pierre sits near the center of Caen near the castle. It was built from the 13th to 16th Century. The original Gothic bell tower was built in the 14th Century but was destroyed in WWII. From 2004 to 2006, the church underwent a massive restoration project to stop damage from water, pollution, and deterioration of the stone.

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    Juno Beach

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Juno

    June Beach is a six-mile wide expanse of ocean front property, second from the west of the five invasion beaches. June sits directly between the British beaches called Gold and Sword. This beach was attacked by the Canadian 3rd Infantry Division, under command of British 2nd Army.

    The assault forces here landed later then planned and had to deal with a difficult high tide that hid German mines. After landing on the beach, the Canadians again took heavy casualties, but were able to push inland and secure their objectives. At the end of the day, 21,000 soldiers landed on this beach but they suffered 1,200 dead, wounded, or missing.

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Caen Things to Do

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