The Cloister, Mont Saint Michel

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  • right side of cloister coming in
    right side of cloister coming in
    by gwened
  • view of bay from Cloisters
    view of bay from Cloisters
    by gwened
  • left side of cloister with church abbey
    left side of cloister with church abbey
    by gwened
  • gwened's Profile Photo

    Cloister at MSM

    by gwened Written Mar 29, 2015

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    a wonderful garden area in the abbey , building done on top of the monastery.

    The cloister is my favorite part of the whole monastery.Cloisers are inspired by the atrium of a Roman villa and providing access to all the essential rooms. At MSM you have to the east, the refectory and the kitchens which no longer exist; to the south, one door led to the church another to the dormitory; to the west, the three traditional apertures must have opened into the chapter hall that was never built and a small door led to the archives. Only the north gallery, in the direction of the sea was not meant to serve as a way of communication with other rooms

    The columns were originally the same white limestone (from England), but time and the elements required a change to granite in 1878 which changed the appearance somewhat. The unbroken continuity in the rhythm of the supports and the absence of the solid masonry at the corners permit the eye to move unhindered and at the same time assures an absolute transparency towards the center of the cloister.

    A tranquil spot in the inmmence stone serenity of the place.

    left side of cloister with church abbey right side of cloister coming in view of bay from Cloisters
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  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    The Cloister

    by Maryimelda Updated Oct 6, 2012

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    The cloister on the top floor of La Merveille dates back to the 13th century but has greatly evolved over time. Today it is really the only area of La Merveille which provides a source of bright colour, as the walkway which was designed for the monks to stroll, converse and pray, surrounds a beautiful and tranquil garden.

    The plants filling the garden at the present time are for the most part, herbacious. Whilst La Merveille is a fascinating complex to tour and wander, it is really lovely to have the bright and colourful beauty of the cloister roof garden to give a temporary break from the somber greys and browns of the stone buildings.

    The cloister
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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE CLOISTER

    by balhannah Written Aug 29, 2011

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    I loved the Cloister, but then I always do, there is something about those arches and the centre garden!
    The cloister is where prayer and meditation took place. It does send out that feeling of peace. The cloister was built at the beginning of the 13th century. Access is obtained from here to the refectory, kitchen, church, dormitory and stairways.
    There is a double row of columns that are slightly out of line, this creates different views. Clever!

    Cloister at Mont St. Michel Cloister Cloister garden Cloister
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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    The cloister

    by JLBG Written Jan 10, 2009

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    The cloister of Mont-Saint-Michel was designed by Thomas des Chambres who bergan to build it in 1228 and finished by Raoul de Villedieu. It has very unusual features. As space was scarce, the architect had to enhance every square centimeter. In irder to have as much light as possible, the pillars had to be very thin but they would have been too weak. He imagined to have two sets of thin pillars standing in alternate rows. This can be seen on the second photo. For more, look at Mont-Saint-Michel web site.

    The cloister The cloister, detail
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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    Enter the Cloisters

    by hquittner Updated Nov 13, 2007

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    The cloisters are entered from the church. They are the most beautiful part of the Abbey. They are early Gothic (finished in 1228) and are the last part of the complex known as the Merveille to be completed. They are situated above the Knight's Hall. Unlike Romanesque antecedents it does not have figured capitals. The decoration is confined to a floral display on the squinches: roses or leaf-vine designs. Above the squinches runs a frieze of rosettes among which a few barn-owls are distributed (not in our picture). The two rows of columnettes below are set in a staggered pattern (quite unusual). Soaring above the cloisters are a set of windows of the North Transept. A chapter house at the West side was never built. On the North the cloisters look out over the bay. The fourth side is next to the church as is the case in most cloisters (except here it is along the North not the South church wall).

    Staggered Columns in the Cloisters The Church's North Transept Looks Down A Cloister Aisle Between the Column Rows The Squinch & Frieze Decoration
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  • Azhut's Profile Photo

    The cloister

    by Azhut Updated Aug 5, 2005

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    The cloister is maybe the part of the Abbey that I loved more. The monks were used to walk along it for many hours, to thing about phylosophical aspect of live, or this is what I imagined when I was there. The place must be quiet and relaxing, an ideal sight for contemplation. It contains a wonderful little garden that makes less austere this side of the Abbey. When you will visit it I think that you will remember some lines of the books you read about monks and middle ages at school.

    The cloister-Pic from the web
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  • Goner's Profile Photo

    The Cloisters

    by Goner Updated May 31, 2004

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    The Cloisters has elegant marble columns, an example of early 13th-century Anglo-Norman style. The buildings of Mont St. Michel are constructed of granite, but there is some limestone in the cloister.

    A small group of Benedictine Monks still inhabit the monastery. It's such a damp and I'm sure a very cold place to live during the winter when the wind blows off the English Channel.

    Cloisters
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