Guerlesquin Local Customs

  • Local Customs
    by CatherineReichardt
  • Local Customs
    by CatherineReichardt
  • Local Customs
    by CatherineReichardt

Most Recent Local Customs in Guerlesquin

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    Marked similarities between Breton and Cornish

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Aug 3, 2012

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    Breton belongs to the Celtic family of languages, and has strong links to both Welsh and Cornish. It's still widely spoken, particularly in Basse (Lower) Bretagne, and the most obvious reflection of Breton's enduring influence (and marked sense of separatism) is that all of the road signs are 'bilingual'.

    If you've travelled in Cornwall, you will easily recognise the marked similarities in placenames. For example, 'Guerlesquin' in French is 'Gwerliskin' in Breton and wouldn't look in the slightest out of place on a roadmap of Cornwall.

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    Anywhere else, these would be Irish pubs!

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Jul 31, 2012

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    I know a thing or two about hostelries, and being of Irish stock, I should be a past master at identifying Irish pubs. Indeed, it is often a source of annoyance to me when I'm exploring a wonderful new city in an exotic location and stumble across a "Molly Malone's" when an authentic local bar would have been so infinitely preferable.

    In Bretagne, I was frankly confused, because so many of the bars looked just like Irish pubs, with their distinctive Celtic lettering, solid square architecture and Celtic-sounding names. But, having some some self sacrificing market research on the matter, I can vouch for the fact that they are distinctly Breton - so, all I have left to say is, "Yec'hed mat!" ("Cheers!")

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    One kiss on the cheek

    by Mikebond Updated Oct 29, 2007

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    Since Guerlesquin is a small village and all its inhabitants know each other, you will certainly assist to the traditional Breton custom of kissing on the cheek (se faire la bise), especially if you visit this village on Mondays, when there is the musical market. Here, only one kiss is usually exchanged. I think I saw very few people add a second one.
    I noticed a boy and a girl who crossed each other in the street, exchanged the bise and went on their way. I think they didn't even say Salut! ("Hello!"), since that is the only meaning of this gesture.

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    Animals at the market

    by Mikebond Written Jul 24, 2006

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    ducklings
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    When I was at the Monday musical market in Guerlesquin I noticed many cages with animals for sale, especially ducklings and little rabbits. There were also pupils with their teachers who told them about these animals or the farm life. It was quite strange for me to see farm animals at the market and it is a fact that nowadays kids living in towns or cities can identify easier a cheetah than a calf, because they read books and see documentaries about exotic animals but they have never seen the animals that live in their own region...

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    Breton market

    by Mikebond Written Jul 24, 2006

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    more Breton than that!
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    The Guerlesquin market is a real show of the Breton soul: you can see and buy many traditional products. I am not sure whether the market takes place on other days than on Monday, the day of the musical market (see my "things to do" tip).

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    Calash

    by Mikebond Written Jul 23, 2006

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    While I was at the musical market, some men went across the streets with a horse carrying a calesh, so children could enjoy a trip in Guerlesquin. I am not sure they did it for free, but it was very Breton, as the men wore traditional costumes, as you can see.

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    Breton bar

    by Mikebond Updated Jul 23, 2006

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    Breton bar

    Should you have forgotten or never known that Guerlesquin is a Breton village, the sign of this bar would remind you of that! The Breton language (brezhoneg) is very spread in Guerlesquin and most streets have Breton names.

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Guerlesquin Local Customs

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