Unique Places in Bretagne

  • around the St you see the back of the Chapelle
    around the St you see the back of the...
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  • chapelle Notre Dame des trois fontaines
    chapelle Notre Dame des trois fontaines
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  • right side chapel with calvary to the right
    right side chapel with calvary to the...
    by gwened

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Bretagne

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    Chapelle Notre Dame des Trois Fontaines-Gouézec

    by gwened Written Mar 29, 2014

    Another marvelous example of chapels that act like churches in the Breton landscape. This one is the Chapelle Notre Dame des Trois Fontaines in the village of Trois Fontaines commune belonging to Gouézec in the Finistére dept 29 of Brittany.

    You need to drive a car and come along the N165 expressway to direction Pleyben on the D765 Route touristique.

    This Chapel is located on the old path of the Tro Breiz, which follows the route of the ancient track of Quimper to Morlaix. The place call Meil-year-Abad, mill of the Abbot, and Manac'h - Ty, home of the monks, recall that the building belonged to the Abbey of Coat Malouen. The nave includes a single aisle in the North. Three sided polygonal apse is of type Beaumanoir. Cruceta erotic nature are perched on the Bell Tower and the southern arm of the crawling transept.

    The Chapel is a building from the end of the 15C, revamped in the 16C and 18C. Built in granite and covered in Slate, the building consists of a nave, a shoulder, a transept and a polygonal apse. The western façade, opened by a 15C portal, is surmounted by a belfry from the 18C. The nave is flanked to the South, a porch gable of the 15C, oblong plan. From the 16C stained glass adorn some windows of the transept and the apse. Calvary dates from 1554 and presents three crosses and a grouping of characters of which there is only a thief and Sainte-Madeleine. The fountain consists of an arcade in warhead partially covering a source. The jewels which ended the Gables have disappeared. A statue of the Virgin is placed in the background.

    you never what to find when you drive in beautiful Brittany.

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    Church of Saint Aubin -Brandivy

    by gwened Written Jan 31, 2014

    This is the town Church, and link to the anti revolution wars of the Chouans against the republican French of Bastille fame.

    A bit of history of this Church only about 10 kms from my house.
    The old church was entirely devastated July 4, 1728 by a fatal fire. It was rebuilt four years later, in 1732. During the Revolution, a Bell and a part of the stalls of the Abbey of lanvaux came to complete the building.

    But during the eighteenth century, the building became too narrow for the needs of the population. The rectors were therefore to rebuild a new Church.

    Finally after some attempts in 1884, the Rector turned back to the generosity of his parishioners. It took a while but the work was done and by January 1885, the choir and the transept were done. The nave and the tower were built with almost as much speed. the new Church was blessed on 22 December 1885. After several adventures, the new belltower was added in 1902.

    The area is real country quaint and a nice ride by car, the only transport as the public bus is rarely seen, hours are vast apart.

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    Chapelle Notre Dame de Lourdes-Brandivy

    by gwened Written Jan 31, 2014

    This is a historical chaple deep in the ravine next to the river Loch that joins the Auray before Fallen into the Gulf of Morbihan at Auray. The name comes because in the grottos caves it was found a crucifix and cross that looks like the grotto at Lourdes, the famous shrine.

    A bit of history tell us that a small square turret (between 1630 and 1636) the signals of its short conical Spire framed four small cones to ball.The beginning of the chapel. It was built by the Lords of Kerberhuet at the beginning of the 16C. The door is arch to the West, hemmed a torus; the southern basket door decorated with a hug from fleurie and where reads the Blazon of the Lords of Kerberhuet ("de gules three Druse of gold"), windows bedside to concave splay. The monolithic altar table beading around its perimeter, always leans on the wall of the apse.

    In the commune, the cult of Saint Lawrence, Martyr on the grill, dates back to distant times. It may be noted also that the chapel dedicated to him is built on a swampy place... What soothe his burns and suffering? Legend has it that the chapel had to be built across the Creek, which separates the boundary between the municipalities of Brandivy and Grand-Champ, but the cart carrying the altar gave way to the place where it stands today, and that men there heard a message from Saint Laurent. To abound in the sense of the legend, told that the stone of the altar broke on one side in his fall. And can be seen today in fact, break the corner of the altar.

    The pilgrimage began in 1912, when Father Le Leuch, then the rector of Brandivy, mentioned these cliffs that dominates the valley of the Loch. He found a lot of similarities with the Rocks of Massabielle at the edge of the valley at Pau...

    a tranquil nice place that comes alive in September each year

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    La Maison de la Cidre

    by gwened Written Jan 18, 2014

    This is a museum but also, tastings and boutique on the Breton ciders, so could be in shopping too, but since it is ,also, educational and a museum will post here

    La Maison de la Cidre is found off the N165 road Brest-Nantes, off exit Presqu'île de Rhuys/Sarzeau ,you are on the road D780 until the traffic circle in the town of Le Hézo on the road D310, you see the cider museum from the road D780. Big panel sign.

    The official point address is at Rue de Lann Vrihan, 56450 Le Hézo .translating their site to English is as follows
    The tour begins with an exhibition on the Apple, pollination, and the essential role of bees (living hive). Then by going through the workings of the farm, you will discover a unique collection of tools and old machines for the manufacture of cider and cider brandy eau de vie called fine de bretagne or lambig.

    In each building, an audio commentary is at your disposal .In our projection room, a 20 minute movie will immerse you in the amazing and traditional world cider makers. The La Maison de la Cidre offers a visit in an authentic setting to discover the traditional manufacture of cider:
    Ancestral methods of farming in the modern techniques of the cider of today.

    Born from the passion for the craft of artisan cidrier, this museum traces activity cider, of the origin of the culture of the Apple in the distillation through crushing, pressing, and all stages of the manufacture of cider. A refreshing visit in the heart of the tradition
    At the end of visit, a tasting of our 4 different cider or Apple juice 'House' and sparkling apple juice you will be offered.

    you can buy it here at the end of the visit or ordered from local home, here
    http://www.museeducidre.com/shop/achat/index.php?catid=20

    which I put just to show the products as the best is to come over ::) We have it at our home.

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    Church St Pierre and St Paul-Pluneret

    by gwened Updated Jan 12, 2014

    Another of the wonderful churches in my area of the department of the Morbihan, the Church of Saints Peter and Paul (finish in 1885), built on the site of an earlier Church from the 11th century. The ancient Church of Pluneret, which the nave dated back to the early years of the 11th century, and the other parties were the 14C and 15C, was demolished in 1876, to make way for a modern building, of Gothic style, completed in 1885 with the construction of a square bell arrow tower similarly crowned a beautiful style. The modern stained glass are due to the master glassmakers Lobin de Tours, Oudinot in Paris and Toulouse Jesta. Honorary rights depended formerly on the seigneury of the Quenhuen, Lords of the Rohello.

    right off road D17

    You always find marvels on the road of the Morbihan. This is some info in French on the town's webpage
    http://www.pluneret.fr/cartographie.php

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    Church of St Colomban -Locminé

    by gwened Updated Jan 9, 2014

    Locminé takes its name from Loch Menech, or site of monks. Many historians claimed that in the 7C many disciples of Saint Gildas de Rhuys prayed at the extreme corners of the parish of abbey Saint Sauveur de Moriac ou Moréac that eventually became St Colomban.

    This country church was built n the 15C and modified in the 1970's . the abbey Laudrin, deputy mayor decided to built a new church than restore the old one, so it was done trying to preserve the facade of the 16C.

    When I arrive in town just before midday they was a mass going on, so did not want to take pictures inside. It is ,also, known as the church of St Sauveur on the new church taking from the old Saint Colomban. Began in 1973,the Church was consacrated with a Mass on the Christmas night of 1975.

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    Church of Saint Sixté-Limerzel

    by gwened Updated Dec 22, 2013

    another Church on my road warrior drives in Bretagne and this one the Morbihan, passing the town of Limerzel, near Rochefort-en-Terre on the road D774, i could not missed the opportunity for a photo and documented it here.

    the Church Saint-Sixte (1889-1895), rebuilt on the plans of the architect M. Le Diberder. The new Church is of style 15C, large and beautiful proportions, three naves separated by columns of granite, vault where looming rich veins, choir parts cut with graceful pendants. Outside, there are powerful buttresses completed in pinnacles. The confessional, dates from 1828. The series of three stained glass windows in the choir, glass dating from 1897-1898, is executed by the widow (these stained glass windows represent the theme of the martyrdom with Christ on the cross, saint Sixte dropping the idols in the Temple of Mars and the martyrdom of saint Lawrence). There were once in the cemetery (now at the rectory) a sundial dating from 1774: it bears the name of François Mabile and the Fleur-de-lis in center decorations. It preserves a wooden statue of the Virgin and the child, as well as a beautiful 16C silver chalice.

    another architectural marvel upon sizing it coming to town.only 1300 inhabitants lives here in the country.

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    tumulus of petit mont -Arzon

    by gwened Written Sep 30, 2013

    this is part of the misterious stones found all over Brittany and especially in the Morbihan whre I live. There seem to be just put there yesterday but...

    in about 5000 BC, the promontory of Petit Mont dominated like today, the ocean, "Mor Braz" to the South. The huge weight of dry stones arranged in successive tiers which constitutes the Cairn was not built at once, but is the result of a long architectural process that ran for more than two thousand years. A tour of 45 minutes you will discover inside of the dolmens, inscribed in stone carvings typical of the registry Armorican, axe, snakelike, Crest rafters, and outside an exceptional views of the Bay of Quiberon South and the Gulf of Morbihan to the North.In April, may, June and September, closed on Wednesday. In July-August, open every day. Guided tours

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    Church of Saint Sané -Camors

    by gwened Written Sep 29, 2013

    This is a nice modern clay white church in city center Camors about 9 kms from me now.

    Camors parish church is dedicated to saint Sane, an Irish bishop who died March 7 544AD. Dating back to the 17th century, this Latin cross-shaped Church contains the headstone of the comte de Lannion and this also two altarpieces in wood. The sacristy is older than the Church and reuses stones from the chapel Sainte-Suzanne. The Church also houses a statue of Saint Marguerite. It has been successively restored in the 18th and 20th centuries.

    more on it
    It has embossed with a brutal realism, the scene of the beheading of St. John the Baptist . According to records, the Church Saint-Sane dates from 1640. However, it was amended by annexes which came to piggy back on the main building at different times. The Church is the result of the merger of two chapels, which gives it an original appearance with its two opposite pinnacles. The sacristy was built with stones from the old Sainte-Suzanne chapel which stood to the North. It is its steeple dominates the pinion to the east.

    another remarkable proof that this area is serious about God.

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    Chapelle Notre Dame du Plasker-Locminé

    by gwened Written Sep 22, 2013

    A nice chapel right in city center near the church of St Colomban. One of the many chapels that adorn this area of the Morbihan, and even region of Brittany.

    The Lady of the Plasker chapel or chapel of the Congregation: located in the city centre, a place of prayers would have existed at its location as early as the 11th century. The present Chapel dates from the 16th century. During the French Revolution, the Chapel is transformed into deposit of material and is used for some time of a decadence temple.
    In 1804, the municipality made down the upper part of the steeple and replaces it with the current "stove". At the beginning of the 20th century the building escaped demolition.

    And its now an integral part of the city and the history of Locminé.

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    Church Saint Tugdual

    by gwened Written Sep 21, 2013

    Lovely church in center of town of Grand Champ, one of my new routes near me.

    It is built on the site of older churches. The latter was built between 1865 and 1867.
    The Church was partially destroyed during the French Revolution, when Grand-Champ was an active centre of the Chouannerie. It was first restored finally rebuilt in the 19th century. The first stone was laid on August 20, 1865, and is inaugurated Saint-Tugdual in November 1867. It is this same year that workers began the construction of the Bell Tower, a square of 40 meter high. This tower is made of granite built on two floors: the first with a porch formed a portal arch, the second with the House of the bells. Just completed, the Bell Tower was equipped with three bells, dating respectively from 1809, 1860 and 1864. A fourth Bell came as reinforcements in 1865, smaller and melted in Ploërmel.The present Church is in the shape of a Latin cross, with two sacristies lean-to along the choir. It is made of granite in a neo-Gothic style.

    Inside it has one of the oldest chasubles( textile outfits in decoration of metal petals) in the Morbihan, a great national treasure to see.

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    Church of Saint Ouen- Plouay

    by gwened Written Jun 16, 2013

    you see the nice church of Saint Ouen, the Church was built at the end of the 14th century, it has a plan in the form of a Latin cross, with two aisles.Its limestone and marble choir develops in three parts: a central panel and two concave wings.
    All connected at the beginning of the 18th century.In the large niches we can see the statues of Saint Barbara and Saint Eloi who seem contemporary, while in the niche above, the statue of Saint Ouen is older.The altar is of simple form.The Monument to the dead lying on the church square was built in 1923 by architect Chandran and the sculptor Gauthier. On the 4 pillars are the corps of the great war: a soldier, a gunner, a sailor, and an airman. Nice complex.

    more on the dept of Morbihan tourist webpage , http://www.morbihan.com/eglise-de-plouay/plouay/tabid/7430/offreid/f45b36c7-d695-487b-b5ff-ee1829ead768/detail-visites.aspx

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    chateau de Rohan ruins at Guéméné

    by gwened Written Jun 16, 2013

    The ruins of the castle of the Rohan , a wonderful historical property,here is the long illustrious story from the source:

    the castle of Rohan (14th century), modified in the 15th century. The first castle was built in the 11th century by the family Guegant (ou Guégant). He was replaced in the 12th century by a fortress which belongs to the Rohan family. Redesigned in the 13th century, it becomes the property of Mabile or Mathilde de Rohan (wife of Robert of bar or Beaumetz) in 1251, and then the property of the Duke of Brittany (after 1369). Duke Jean III died in 1341, a struggle is committed for his estate between Jean de Monfort and Charles of Blois. The captain of the stronghold of Guémené is a named Raynaud. In July 1342, on the orders of Charles de Blois, Louis of Spain besieges Guémené who surrounded. Pierre Porteboeuf succeeded a little later and Louis of Spain called Gerard of Malin, Captain of Guémené. In December 1342, the English, allies of Montfort, who put the seat in throne of Guémené. The English eventually leave Guémené in 1369. In 1371, Jeanne de Rostrenen yields to Guémené-Duke Jean IV against a life annuity of a thousand pounds. The latter makes Guémené Jeanne de Beaumer, its lawful owner and her husband Jean de Longueval. In 1377, John, Duke Viscount of Rohan, married his second wife Jeanne de Navarre and buys from the Lord of Longueval the”city, chatel for 3,400 francs of gold. October 31, 1378 the acquisition by the Viscount of Rohan of châtellenies Kemene-Gomez and rock-Periou is confirmed by the King Charles V. Charles de Rohan, son of Jean I de Rohan and Jeanne de Navarre, inherits in 1384 ‘ châtellenies, cities and fortresses of Quesmenet-guégon. Charles de Rohan – Guéméné, in 1406, married Catherine du Guesclin, and both are the founders of the branch of the Rohan-Guéméné. About 1474, Louis I, Duke of Rohan – Guéméné (husband of Louise de Rieux) built the current Castle. The work extend until 1486. The walls to a height of 15 metres and 300 metres in diameter, was defended by eight towers (including the Dungeon). In 1522 Louis IV de Guéméné and wife Marie de Rohan make disarm the castle into a Palace. The Bishop Claude Rohan died at the Château de Guémené July 8, 1540, and Marie de Rohan (wife of Louis V), June 9, 1542. In September 1570, Charles IX penalised the principality of Guémené , by order letters given at Monceau, in favour of Louis VI de Guéméné. The castle is taken by Gabriel de Goulaine (right arm of Mercœur) and his Catholics in 1589, while Louis VI de Rohan had left the place by asking Thomas Tuault of the Palevart and the master of Saint-Georges to defend (the garrison consisted of then Lords of Kerdisson, de Launay, of Rimaison, of Kermahon, Kerhourin and a few adventurers). January 28, 1590, the castle was taken over by the royalists commanded by Prince de Dombes. In April 1591 and in January 1592, the Leaguers attempt again, but without success, to reconquered the Castle. In 1592, were Spanish League soldiers who occupy the castle for three weeks. In April 1598, following the signing of the edict of Nantes by Henri IV, the Spaniards then leave the Kingdom. By 1629, the Castle began to be dismantled on the orders of King Louis XIII. Attempting to restore the castle to 1644. An admission of 1682 briefly describes the castle: “the Château de Guémené, closed and closed high and strong walls, trimmed of machicolations and gunners, eight towers and pavilions, with several body building, surrounded and enclosed by moats and ditches, wide and deep and full of water, closing at drawbridge; the extent of which contains funds, including the moat, four newspapers and a half. Said Castle and the town of Guémené are required of the King as ancient Châtellenie in high, medium and low justice, with all the prerogatives of the edict of Principality in 1570, to which are appended the seigniories and fiefs of Leon, La Roche Messina, Trefaven and Plouhinec.” Partially restored in the 18th century (c. 1775) by Jules-Hercules prince of Rohan, the castle is confiscated as many emigrated by the Act of February 12, 1792, and serves as a military prison during the Revolution (it hosts approximately 500 English prisoners).

    In 1795, on 29 January, the garrison of Guémené, surprised by the chouans, takes refuge in the Castle and leaves the enemy loot the barracks and burn the papers of the municipality. In 1803, he was designated to accommodate invalids, in 1804 or 1808 to serve as a barracks. The princesse de Guéméné died in 1807 and prince Henri-Louis died in Prague in 1808. In 1814, the Duchess of Montbazon receives the succession of Guémené and resells all at a named Declerq, Tournay banker, for a sum of 2 115 000 francs. The castle was acquired in 1843 by the Juttard-Lannivon family. In ruins, it was demolished in 1926. The ramparts that remain date from 1380 and the door dates from the end of the 15th century; a piece of history to walk on by.

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    Church Notre Dame de la Fosse-Guémené

    by gwened Written Jun 16, 2013

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    The wonderful small church of Notre Dame de la Fosse, the church (19th century), rebuilt around 1820. The Bell Tower dates from the 18th century and stood near the present Church: it houses four bells. The former Bell Tower collapsed in 1757.

    This church’s square and surmounted by a dome, whose construction was decided by the Guémené(-sur-Scorff) factory in 1761, has replaced a former collegiate church of the 14th century who disappeared during the Revolution, despite many vicissitudes. A college of canons was founded in 1529 by Mary and Louis IV de Rohan, the Lords of Guémené.

    The choir of the Church is enlarged in the 16th century to accommodate the chapter (six canons) and stalls are installed. Stalls are reworked in 1932 and only remain today the sculpted panels. These sculpted panels now adorn the side altars and are the only remnants of the former collegiate church.

    A nice church in a historical culinary town of Brittany.http://www.guemenesurscorff.com/histoire_collegiale.html

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    Church of Sainte Marie Magdaleine-Landaul

    by gwened Written Jun 1, 2013

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    A wonderful smallish church with plenty of history,and another small inland town of Morbihan all unique and nice

    The Church Saint-Theleau or Sainte-Marie-Madeleine (15th century). St. Madeleine replaces saint thuriau at the beginning of the 19th century and St. Madeleine is replaced by saint Theleau in 1903. The parish church of Landaul having been demolished in 1862, the chapel Notre-Dame (Notre-Dame de Bon-Secours) founded by the Kerambourg family, which was nearby became a parish church in May 1863, after it had turned it annex them completely including two large chapels forming braces to the North and the South. The chapel was built around 1450.

    In it fortunately been preserved intact the beautiful Western Portal Berry basket which the covings are decorated with rinceaux of foliages, struggling under a large openings in several archivolts arcade overcoming a perforated eardrum. On the gable is a Bell Tower square, back at least a century, once surmounted by a stone Spire and flanked by a cylindrical stair Tower.

    The nave dates from the end of the 15th century. Against the North Gable, sealed on a slab of granite, stone of saint Barbe, St. Isidore and St. Margaret statues are aligned

    wonderful.In addition here is the tourist office for the region that includes my town Auray
    http://www.auray-tourisme.com/eglise-sainte-marie-madeleine/landaul/tabid/8277/offreid/21f1cf98-8eb5-4fef-8e3f-fb0d58a8d386/detail.aspx

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