Rennes Things to Do

  • basilique Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle
    basilique Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle
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  • enactment of the Nativity during Christmas season
    enactment of the Nativity during...
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  • basilica Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle front
    basilica Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle...
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Most Recent Things to Do in Rennes

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    visit the parc du Thabor

    by gwened Written Dec 30, 2013

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    grill wrought iron gates at pl st Melaine entrance
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    a wonderful park, right in city center and surrounded by historical Church Notre Dame de St Melaine.
    Tthe Parc du Thabor is a public park on more than ten hectares whose characteristic is to mix a French garden, an English garden and an important botanical garden. Its name refers to a mountain overlooking Lake Tiberias in Israel, Mount Tabor. Since its private origin, vegetable garden and accreditation of the monks of Abbey of Saint-Melaine long outside the "walls" of the city, one of the landmarks of the city and most popular.

    a bit of history
    Originally, the Park was only a hill peaking at 56 meters above sea level, meaning that it dominated a large part of Rennes, whose altitude varies between 20 and 74 meters. The first mentions of Thabor dates to 1610. These are the Benedictine monks who named du tertre, in reference to Mount Tabor of the Bible. During the middle ages and the Ancien Régime, the walled enclosure did not allow the extension of the gardens: only convents lands were extensive enough to allow the creation of orchards and jardins. In addition, Rennes did extend that little beyond the Abbey Saint-Melaine East before the Revolution. The fields of Thabor have long been a dependency of the Abbey Saint-Melaine, where they were mainly used as an orchard. In the 17C, the Benedictine monks opened their gardens, but they were reserved for the gent masculine. It was accessed on to Thabor by a passage that communicated between the cloister inside of the Abbey and its vegetable garden, throught a door. Following the great fire of 1720, Thabor became the seat of the bishopric. The Palace of the Bishop's Palace was built and part of the gardens became those of the bishop.
    The revolution, all ecclesiastical areas is attached to the State. May 10, 1793, Rennes becomes owner of these lands as a result of an Exchange with the State: Army wishing to create an arsenal in the municipal hospice, the city «receives» Saint-Mélaine to accommodate its elderly. The Catherinette hospice and the buildings of Saint-Melaine and its vegetable garden became the general hospice. A public walk was opened on the remainder of the lands of the bishopric and the Benedictines; the principal entry is the Court of the bishopric. The State chooses the episcopal Palace to host the Central School of natural history as well as a Museum of natural history and Arts and botanical school. A school of Botany is created and the garden of the Bishop becomes a botanical garden, and received the new name of "Jardin des plantes" . From 1807 to 1840, the Jardin des plantes , a law removes central schools: at the close of 1805, the city recovers the load of the museum of natural history and the school of botanics. At the signing of the concordat of 1801, the Bishop recovers his palace, but not the gardens which remain the property of the city. The city opens access via the rue de Fougéres, but Bishop was bothered by the visitors, who came just to its windows. In 1812, access leading to the rue de la Palestine bypass the problem. From 1811 to 1814, a legal battle ensues between the bishopric, which wants to recover its former property, and the city of Rennes, who wants to keep it. In 1814, the Count of Ferrières, special Commissioner sent in Brittany by king Louis XVIII, decides that the Bishop can recover its former Garden: public promenade is shortened. During the 20C, it is performed some minor adjustments like adding grills wrought iron at the entrance of the rue de Paris in 1912 and avenue of Grignan in 1926, but also the creation of a menagerie in 1930. Following the success of the Park of Maurepas created mainly as a playground game and relaxation in 1936, the parc du Thabor receives this type equipement.

    South of the Botanical Garden and the rose garden, municipal greenhouses , named Duchess Anne greenhouses are built in 1936 to meet the needs of the gardeners of the Park, the greenhouses between the Orangery was too small to get the plants necessary for the maintenance of the Park. In 2002, the city of Rennes centralizes on the horticultural centre of Champeaux production plants in all of the parks and gardens of Rennes. Duchess Anne greenhouses were demolished early in 2005 to release the field of implementation of social housing, as well as a district library and a new entry to the parc leading to the square Lucien Rose.

    see in it, the following
    square Du Guesclin was laid out in bowling lawn in 1825
    The square of du Guesclin,is behind the theatrical space l'Enfer or hell
    An aged tree of several centuries, Saint-Melaine oak, which, according to legend, would have known the saint in person was in the l'Enfer or hell. It remained only a live branch in 1980 and the tree tore on January 5 1981.
    the space l'Enfer or Hell hosted a "espachien" where the visitor can leave his dog free . it moved south of the square Duguesclin. Neglected space is part of a project for the creation of an area of concerts.
    Facing L'Enfer, a very leafy square houses an amusement for children, and carrousel
    Between the l'Enfer and the French gardens(jardin à la française), a bar and restaurant is located along rue de la Palestine
    in the French garden in 1807, the Orangery and two greenhouses were built, but the latter were replaced almost sixty years later (in 1862 and 1863) by the greenhouses designed by Martenot
    the Botanical Garden, which was West of the Orangery was moved east of the Park.
    The landscaped garden is divided broadly into two areas: firstly the garden designed by Denis Bühler, offering more grassy open spaces and landscaping openings allowing the creation of picturesque landscapes, then that of the engineer Blin, more confined. However, landscaped the garden rest instead idealization of nature.
    The Park is comprised of 52,000 m2 of lawn, 5,800 m2 of shrubberies and trees including 200 conifers.
    The statues have been added at the end of the 19C. The removal of Eurydice, carried out in 1890 and the hunting of Diane, made in 1894 by Charles Lenoir are located in the East-West alignment of the gardens. This last sculpture, because of the nakedness of the breasts of Diane, faced censorship of the 19C. The poet Tiercelin elevated the debate by declaring that "sculpture, this is the line, and the line in sculpture is the nudity." Multiple copies of the Louvre or Versailles performed by the students of the fine arts in Rennes are spread over many French gardens. There were originally five busts (the busts of a fauna, Ariane, Jupiter, Bacchus and Alexander) but there is currently only the bust of a bearded man according to the map at the entrance to the square of du Guesclin, probably the bust of Jupiter. Indeed, the highly degraded statues are in rehabilitation. To the West of the orangerie, a magpie flora and fauna to the kid so is at the centre of a massive floral, while a woman on foot disappears into the foliage East of the orangerie. At the end of the garden à la française, to the limit with the Botanical Garden, found a path worn in the North-South axis with at each end the child to the goose, copy of the Louvre. A monument to the memory of Charles Lenoir is located opposite the hunting of Diane. It was previously a bust of the Rennes painter, but it was melted by the Nazis in 1942

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    Cathedral Saint Pierre- interiors

    by gwened Written Dec 30, 2013
    nave of Cathedral Saint Pierre de Rennes
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    This is a massive Church Cathedral, and lots of history of Rennes,it is a beautiful Church and a must to see when in town. I will give some highlights mostly historical of the exterior and interior (another tip).
    this is the official site of the Cathedral in French with schedules
    http://cathedralerennes.catholique.fr/info/cathedraleStPierre.html

    a bit on the history and the interior
    The current site of the Cathedral was used as the seat of a bishopric since the 6C. The older Church completely replaced by a Gothic church in the 12C, but in 1490 the tower and the West front collapsed. It therefore undertook a lengthy reconstruction of the Western massif lasted 163 years which resulted in the classic granite façade we see today. The Cathedral was spared by the fire of 1720 which stops at a few meters.
    The nave and choir however had not been restored and threatened ruin. In 1730, the architect Jacques V Gabriel them was deemed irreparable. On February 11, 1754, in full religious service a large rock broke from the vault of the choir.
    The renovation project was given Under orders of king Louis XV in Council on 9 March 1762. The demolition took place from 1756 to 1768. The King hesitated and the project was frozen. In 1780, the Commission of relief sought again to restore it. It was then that the Nantes architect Mathurin Crucy presented a project that respected the former orientation of the building and a more reasonable cost. Reconstruction began in 1787, but the French Revolution stopped the work.
    They resumed in 1816 and completed under the monarchy of July. Now neoclassical Cathedral with classical façade was completed in 1845. During the work, from 1803 and 1844, the former Abbey of Saint-Melaine was the Pro-Cathedral of Rennes.(see other tip).

    The interior has a nave of 44 ionic columns, which gives a greater brightness to the Cathedral.
    The semicircular Vault however is decorated with golds, work of Auguste Louis Jobbé-Duval, who was also responsible for the decoration of the Parliament of Brittany. It contains patches to the arms of Brittany and the suffragan dioceses of the Archdiocese of Rennes. The flooring of the choir is composed of austere granite. They offer a strong contrast with the high altar with marble offered by Pope Pius IX and the Roman forum. The vault of the choir is decorated with a painting representing the predation by Christ of the keys of heaven to saint Peter.
    The choir with the handover of the keys to Saint Peter (Alphonse Le Hénaff, 1871) and the first plan Arcabas furniture (1995). The choir is surrounded by an ambulatory whose walls are decorated with representations of different saints of Brittany grouped according to their diocese (Rennes, DOL, Saint-Malo, Saint-Brieuc, Tréguier, Saint Pol de Leon, Quimper, Vannes). They are due to the 19C painter Alphonse Le Hénaff.
    The two braces of the transept have a sumptuous Chapel adorned with remarkable frescoes. Those of the southern Chapel are dedicated to Saint Anne, patron saint of Brittany. There is also the table of deliverance of saint Peter by the painter Henri-Joseph de Forestier given by Charles X. The work dates from 1827 and represents St. Peter delivered from prison by an angel.

    The Northern chapel has a series of frescoes dedicated to Mary. They thus participate in the Marian cult widespread in Brittany. The entrance is under the heavy slab engraved with names, in the middle of the central aisle of the Cathedral. In this crypt, no one comes. Only during the burial of a Bishop or an Archbishop, it is visited. In the crypt are buried among others:
    cardinal Alexis - Armand Charost in 1930
    Archbishop René - Pierre Meuced in 1939
    cardinal Clement Roques in 1964
    Archbishop François Saint-Macary in 2007
    Archbishop Jacques Jullien in 2012

    The Cathedral hosts a great masterpiece: an Antwerp 16C Flemish altarpiece decorated with 80 characters. It was restored in 1984. In the chapel dedicated to saint Malo is the array of Holy Marguerite, designed by Pierre Mignard from the 17C. This table is a copy of Raphael whose original is currently in the Department of paintings of the Museum of the Louvre. In the chapel of Saint-Michel, you can admire the statue of Sainte Anne, copy of a work from the 15C.

    The great organ of the Cathedral dates back to 1874. The instrument, built in a romantic aesthetics by the factor Aristide Cavaillé-Coll, is housed in a buffet, by the architect Alphonse Simil. After a few changes made by Victor González in 1939-1940, the instrument is completely rebuilt by the manufacture Haerpfer-Erman in 1970 in a neo-classical spirit. Today, the great organ of the Cathedral of Rennes constitute the most important instrument of the Department of Ille-and-Vilaine,No 35.
    The towers of the Cathedral Saint Pierre of Rennes are home to a ring of five bells. The drone, named Godefroy, is housed in the North Tower, this Bell, was blessed on 13 October 1867. It weighs about 7 900 kg. Its 240 kg flying changed on 12 December 2011. The other four bells, located in the South Tower, bear the names of Marie, Pierre, Amand and Melaine. They weigh 3 950 kg, 1 467 kg, 1 155 kg and 475 kg. Pierre was blessed on 6 November 1843. The other three bells blessed April 15,1844.

    totally awesome to meander about Inside.

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    Cathedral Saint Pierre -exteriors

    by gwened Written Dec 30, 2013
    Cath��drale Saint Pierre
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    This is a massive Church Cathedral, and lots of history of Rennes,it is a beautiful Church and a must to see when in town. I will give some highlights mostly historical of the exterior and interior (another tip).
    this is the official site of the Cathedral in French with schedules
    http://cathedralerennes.catholique.fr/info/cathedraleStPierre.html

    a bit on the history and the exterior
    The current site of the Cathedral was used as the seat of a bishopric since the 6C. The older Church completely replaced by a Gothic church in the 12C, but in 1490 the tower and the West front collapsed. It therefore undertook a lengthy reconstruction of the Western massif lasted 163 years which resulted in the classic granite façade we see today. The Cathedral was spared by the fire of 1720 which stops at a few meters.
    The nave and choir however had not been restored and threatened ruin. In 1730, the architect Jacques V Gabriel them was deemed irreparable. On February 11, 1754, in full religious service a large rock broke from the vault of the choir.
    The renovation project was given Under orders of king Louis XV in Council on 9 March 1762. The demolition took place from 1756 to 1768. The King hesitated and the project was frozen. In 1780, the Commission of relief sought again to restore it. It was then that the Nantes architect Mathurin Crucy presented a project that respected the former orientation of the building and a more reasonable cost. Reconstruction began in 1787, but the French Revolution stopped the work.
    They resumed in 1816 and completed under the monarchy of July. Now neoclassical Cathedral with classical façade was completed in 1845. During the work, from 1803 and 1844, the former Abbey of Saint-Melaine was the Pro-Cathedral of Rennes.(see other tip).

    the exterior shows a facade and its two classical towers of 48 meters high in granite built in several stages throughout the 16C and 17C. The towers contain four levels. The first was built from 1541 to 1543, the second and the third from 1640 to 1654 , and the fourth and last from 1654 to 1678. Finally ,the coronation of the towers were done between 1679 and 1704, to their current height of 48 meters and added on the pediment at the top of the front the motto of Louis XIV (Nec pluribus impar, the incomparable). In addition to the front, the façade has five coats of freestone (from top to bottom, right to left):
    that of Beaumanoir,
    one of Charles d'Albert D'Ailly (1625-1698), 3rd Duke of Chaulnes, Governor of Brittany,.
    the Jean-Baptiste de Beaumanoir de Lavardin, Bishop of Rennes from 1676 to 1711.
    one of Henri de La Mothe-Houdancourt, Bishop of Rennes from 1642 to 1662.
    the duc Charles de La Porte (1602-1664).

    To emphasize the strength of the new together as opposed to the fragility of the previous construction, architects have endowed the facade of 22 granite columns. The pediment is the arms of Louis XIV.

    gorgeous after all.

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    Church of Notre Dame de Saint Melaine

    by gwened Written Dec 30, 2013
    church Notre Dame en Melaine
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    a historic Church abbey right by parc du Thabor, another must see in Rennes, it is wonderful/ located at Place Saint Melaine.
    A bit of history
    Notre-Dame-en-Saint-Melaine is a Church that serve as Cathedral during the first half of the 19C.
    Between 1803 and 1844, the Cathedral Saint-Pierre de Rennes, voluntarily demolished at the end of the 18C and not yet rebuilt, was no more used as Cathedral nor as sanctuary. the Bishop of Rennes, decided to temporarily install the seat of the diocese in the abbey church Notre-Dame-en-Saint-Melaine, which became a pro-cathedrale, i.e. provisional Cathedral.

    The shrine is dedicated to saint Melaine, traditionally regarded as the first bishop of Rennes and died here in the 6th century. Presents itself today as a building combining Romanesque and Gothic styles behind a classical and neoclassical tower. Its plan is in the shape of a Latin cross.
    The early church was built on the grave of saint Melaine, Bishop of Rennes at the end of the 5C and early 6C. It was burned and rebuilt twice, in the 7C and 10C. Gervais, Abbot of Saint-Melaine led the construction of the Romanesque church (1081-1109), which parts remain today: it is the transept and the bases of the Bell Tower. In the first half of the 13C, the square of the transept was covered with a canopy of warheads, whose departure is still visible. In the 14C, the nave arcades and clerestory windows are redone, and choir. In 1432, the Bell Tower was rebuilt on Romanic foundation.

    On 21 August 1627, the maurists settled in Saint-Melaine and perform heavy changes. In 1676, the facade of the Tower is completely redone in carved limestone, making also in 1683 a new cloister, but the capitals and columns of the former cloister from the 11C, are kept in the Museum of Brittany. The Abbey Church Saint-Melaine became parish in 1791 the Abbey being removed. It then it becomes parish from 1844 under the name of Notre-Dame ,and today Notre-Dame-en-Melaine. In 1855, the Bell Tower is raised to an additional floor and crowned with a statue of the Virgin in golden lead, it ,also, was added a buffet organ in romantic style, and an original way of the cross, painted and not carved as was then common in fourteen paintings done in a classic style. The church was damaged during WWII and restored in the 1960s.

    a must to see with a visit to the next door parc du Thabor.

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    Basilica Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle

    by gwened Written Dec 30, 2013
    basilique Notre Dame de Bonne Nouvelle
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    another marvel of a Church basilica in Rennes, this one by the place Sainte Anne in the center of Rennes. Another one to see while in Rennes.
    a bit of history
    The Church Saint-Aubin de Notre-Dame de Bonne Nouvelle is a current church replacing a former Church on the same place. It was erected into a basilica on August 6, 1916. The basilica, erected in full third Republic came to replace the old parish church Saint-Aubin.

    Tradition has it that the Duke of Brittany Jean IV awarded the victory of the party of the Montfort on Blois, during the war of succession of the Duchy, during the battle of Auray to the intercession of the Virgin Mary. In 1368, he founded the Dominican convent of Rennes who quickly took the name of monastery of Bonne-Nouvelle, a painting on wood of the Madonna and child becoming the object of veneration of the Rennes faithful during the 15C. Various miracles had accompanied this devotion, particularly the end of an epidemic of plague in 1634, following a vow affecting the realization of a model in solid silver from the city of Rennes at the stop of the scourge. Similarly, during the great fire of Rennes from December 23, 1720, the Virgin of Bonne Nouvelle or good news emerged in the sky, the event represented a painting in the Basilica of Saint-Sauveur.

    Is that the vow was melted during the French revolution and replaced after a cholera epidemic in 1849 with a new ex-votos dating from 1861. During the Prussian invasion of 1871, Bishop Brossay-Saint-Marc decided to offer a candle to Notre-Dame de Bonne Nouvelle each September 8, if the town was spared. This tradition has continued and the Saint-Aubin Church was built in Basilica
    The building, although unfinished (still renovation but can be visited), presents itself as a Latin cross with a large choir. The nave, with three spans, is between collateral favoring one easy movement during liturgies, in relation to a parish populous and urban. It leads to a largely overflowing transept, each arm with two spans. The choir, extending distribution to three aisles of the nave, ends with a pentagonal apse. Its aisles are office of ambulatory, allowing to bypass the Liturgical Choir and access at the bedside, rather than devotion to Notre-Dame-de-Bonne-Nouvelle. Sacristy and catechism room lodge for their part in the wake of the transepts, along the first two spans.

    The elevation has two floors: large arches and windows-high. Performed in the Gothic style in the 13C, the basilica was inspired by the cathedrals of Chartres, Clermont and Amiens. The stained glass windows of the Basilica are its major ornamental element. The bulk of the glazing, declining floral reasons is the work of master glassmakers. However, the high windows of the apse are representations of the cult of Notre-Dame de Bonne Nouvelle , as well as a certain number of rondels. Are also shown in medallions of scenes from the history of Brittany in connection with the Duchess Anne.

    another jewel to be seen. Deeply religious in a religious city, it is not in the tourist office lineup but nevertheless for me one of the best must see in town. In contact the Catholic diocese webpage on the basilica

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    Basilica Saint Sauveur

    by gwened Written Dec 30, 2013
    basilique Saint Sauveur
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    a wonderful Church basilica with wonderful fine arts in displays sometimes borrow from the fine arts museum. It is one to see while in Rennes.

    The Basilica of Saint-Sauveur de Rennes is a minor Basilica of the Roman Catholic Church, under the patronage of our Lady of Miracles and virtues. The cult of our Lady is important on several miracles being attributed to her. The facade is located place Saint-Sauveur, in the heart of the historic centre of Rennes. Rebuilt in 1703 in the classical style after the collapse of the medieval church, the basilica was particularly distinguished by its furniture: the high altar, Chair wrought iron canopy, organ.

    The exterior style of the building recalls, on a smaller scale, the Church of Gesù in Rome and the Basilica of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires of Paris. Of modest size (43 m × 26 m), the Church has a shape of a Latin cross with multiple cut-outs, with a nave of three bays and two collateral, a cut sided apse and a transept little saillant.

    The door lintel in flower bed is topped by a bow basket which the tympanum bears the name of the Church ("Christo Salvatori"). A tablet in lintel door arms and the motto of the Church ("Ad Jesum per Mariam"). Share and other two semicircular niches framed by pilasters are intended to receive statues but left empty, probably due to lack of funds. On a topped nude frieze with cornice, the second level includes a large window arches between two pairs of pilasters and two fins. Finally, a paired architrave supports a triangular pediment top, crowned with a damping bearing a cross. The whole is Tuscan order. This typical orders superposes Italian façade from the 18C can be found in other contemporary buildings: Church of Val-de-Grâce, Basilica of Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, Église des Billettes or church Saint-Thomas-of Aquinas. In Rennes, two other buildings had already been built with a facade similarly style: the Church of the convent of the Visitation in 1662 and the Church of the convent of Augustins (now Saint-etienne Church) in 1700. A tower is located adjoining North facade. The ground floor and the first floor are square in plan, the second level in folded corners. The tower is capped by a dome with socket with a lantern supporting itself a cross.

    The North and South facades are pierced by two rows of arched windows without mullions illuminating the side aisles and the high nave and corresponding to each span and choir. Concave buttresses topped by pinnacles rise aisles and separate the bays of the nave. Walls back braces are also pierced by windows in height, but the North and south transept walls are blind.

    The roof of the main ship is Saddleback steep with a turnbacks. It ends hipped on the apse and braces. The aisles have a single slope of low slope roofs. The whole is covered with slate. A Lantern Tower is located at the crossing of the transept. A cornice with modillions Crown the whole edifice.

    The interiors are done in a Latin cross plan consisting of a nave with two aisles, a narrow transept, a short chorus and a cut, without ambulatory or apsidal sided apse. The nave has three bays against one for the chorus. The first two spans of the north aisle are slightly deeper. The first contains the baptismal font, the second, the confessionals. The second span of the South aisle was enlarged at the beginning of the 20C to accommodate the chapel of our Lady of Miracles. The aisles communicate with the central ship and the transept by semicircular arches supported by square pillars. Each face of these pillars is decorated with a Doric pilaster. The South aisle has a canopy to each span. The Northern aisle only has two, the first span being adjacent to the tower. The span of the choir has a single canopy on the South side, the North, blind wall, being occupied by a sham
    The high altar is surmounted by a canopy remarkable, carried out in 1768 . Four Saint-Berthevin marble Corinthian columns support a concave wood cornice whose decor recalls the marble columns. On this Ridge lie four Golden spirals that are themselves a canopy. A Trinitarian glory, Golden cardboard, occupies the central volume, at the level of the cornice. A canvas depicting the transfiguration of Christ occupies the bottom of the apse.The statue of our Lady of Miracles and virtues, often simply called our Lady of Miracles, is a Madonna and child. Installed in 1876, it just replace the original statue venerated since the 14C and destroyed during the French revolution.
    The original statue is mentioned as early as the 14tC as part of a miracle that would have occurred during a siege of the city. It is already a Madonna and child painted wood. It is repainted in 1445, and then his hands are restored in 1522.

    nice

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    Parlement de Bretagne

    by grayfo Updated Aug 13, 2013

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    Built between 1618 and 1655 the parliament of Brittany was situated in the heart of the city, in February 1994, a fire tore through the building as a consequence of violent demonstrations by local fishermen, arguably the most famous building in Rennes the building was rebuilt and now houses the Rennes Court of Appeal.

    email clemence.hugo@justice.fr

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    Musée Beaux-Arts or fine arts museum

    by gwened Updated Jun 23, 2013
    front door mus��e Beaux-Arts
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    One of the jewels of the city of Rennes. admission adult is 5,95€ some info
    open Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays,and Sundays from 10h - 12h and 14h - 18h
    Tuesday all day continuosly from 10h - 18h. Closed Mondays and Holidays

    You get here as told in directions or from out of town by car into city centre then parking Kléber, or metro A République or buses at stop or arrêt "Musée beaux-arts", no. 4, 6, 40, 64, and 67
    Buses stop or arrêt "Lycée Zola" ,no. 54, 55,and 56
    Vélo STAR : station avenue Janvier (bike rental place)

    A must to see is the Dame d'Antinoé, (3-4C BC) a mommy painted taken from Egypt in 1909.

    a bit of history
    Built in 1794 from work taken from religious buildings and civilian of the city, but the most goodies comes from the collection of Christophe-Paul de Robien (1698-1756), président of the parlement of Brittany. These encyclopedic collections is one of the most rich in Europe, paintings, sculptures, Egyptian, Greek,and Celtique antiquairies, work of arts from all continents,and some remarkable ensemble of designs by Léonard de Vinci, Botticelli, Dürer ,and Rembrandt.

    Really a top museum and on its genre ,the best in Brittany, a must to see in details.

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    Jardin du Thabor

    by Mikebond Updated Jul 6, 2009

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    the gate
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    The Jardin du Thabor was the kitchen garden of the Benedictines, who called it like the Palestinian mount. In the 18th century, the garden was opened to the public and today it's the largest park in Rennes. You can find there a French and a botanical garden. Have a look at the gate and at the statues among the flowers (fourth photo).

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    Parlement of Brittany

    by codrutz Written Sep 30, 2008

    Rennes is the capital of Brittany (one of the 26 admintrative regions of France). The court of justice was established in 1554 by King Henry II and the name was the "Parlement" of Brittany (Bretagne). In 1561 the Parlement was set up in Rennes so it needed a building. Drafting the plans alone took 50 years, then another 90 years to build - 1618-1709. Fires threatened the building in 1720 as well as in present days in 1994, when some 17th century wood works in the Pas Perdus room dissappeared in the fire. The interior of the Parlement worth a visit.

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    Palais du Commerce

    by codrutz Written Sep 30, 2008
    Palais du Commerce

    This is I guess the largest building in Rennes. Built on the bank of the Villaine river relatively recent - 1885-1929 - it was raised to obscure the smaller buildings behind and give the city a more modern look.

    It housed the commodities exchange and the postal and telegraph office. Now it's the post office.

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    Notre-Dame-en-Sainte-Mélaine

    by Mikebond Updated Nov 8, 2006

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    Sainte-M��laine

    This church is not important, but you will see it when you go to spend some time at the jardin du Thabor (see next tip).
    Sainte-Mélaine was the church of the Benedictine abbey The only original parts that have remained until today are the transept (11th century) and the tower (14th century) because all the rest was rebuilt in the 17th century.

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    Saint-Germain

    by Mikebond Updated Nov 7, 2006

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    Saint-Germain
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    Saint-Germain is a Gothic church built in the 15th and 16th centuries. You should look at the large 16th-century window in the right transept, which depicts scenes from the lives of the Virgin, Saint John the Baptist and Jesus Christ. You see it in the second photo and a description of it in the fifth photo of this tip.
    Besides, the third and fourth images in this tip show two modern windows on the nave designed by Max Ingrand (I have never heard of him!).

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    • Architecture
    • Arts and Culture

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    Place des Lices

    by Mikebond Updated Nov 5, 2006

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    Place des Lices
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    Place des Lices is one of the most typical squares and one of my favourite places in Rennes. It was there that knight jousting used to take place in the Middle Ages. After being enlarged in the 16th century, it hosted the hôtels particuliers. They were the residences of members of Parliament built in a kind of medieval-like style. You can still see these half-timbered houses around the square and in some streets nearby. (To be honest, I'm not sure that all of these pictures refer to this square. Some could have been taken in another place).
    Today, place des Lices is one of the main meeting points for the Rennes people. Evidence for this is provided by the many tables outside the bars (see the first, second and fifth photo).
    A very nice location, indeed! Don't miss it!

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    • Architecture

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    Palais Saint-Georges

    by Mikebond Updated Oct 21, 2006

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    Palais Saint-Georges
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    Palais Saint-Georges was originally a Benedictine abbey. It was founded in 1032, rebuilt in the following century and completely remade in the 17th century, when it was given its present appearance. Today, the palace houses administration offices.
    Beside photographing the elegant façade of the building, have a look at the gardens and sit down on a bench to enjoy the colourful flowerbeds.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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