Rennes Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by alectrevor
  • Things to Do
    by alectrevor
  • Things to Do
    by alectrevor

Most Recent Things to Do in Rennes

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    Musée Beaux-Arts or fine arts museum

    by gwened Updated Jun 23, 2013

    One of the jewels of the city of Rennes. admission adult is 5,95€ some info
    open Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays,and Sundays from 10h - 12h and 14h - 18h
    Tuesday all day continuosly from 10h - 18h. Closed Mondays and Holidays

    You get here as told in directions or from out of town by car into city centre then parking Kléber, or metro A République or buses at stop or arrêt "Musée beaux-arts", no. 4, 6, 40, 64, and 67
    Buses stop or arrêt "Lycée Zola" ,no. 54, 55,and 56
    Vélo STAR : station avenue Janvier (bike rental place)

    A must to see is the Dame d'Antinoé, (3-4C BC) a mommy painted taken from Egypt in 1909.

    a bit of history
    Built in 1794 from work taken from religious buildings and civilian of the city, but the most goodies comes from the collection of Christophe-Paul de Robien (1698-1756), président of the parlement of Brittany. These encyclopedic collections is one of the most rich in Europe, paintings, sculptures, Egyptian, Greek,and Celtique antiquairies, work of arts from all continents,and some remarkable ensemble of designs by Léonard de Vinci, Botticelli, Dürer ,and Rembrandt.

    Really a top museum and on its genre ,the best in Brittany, a must to see in details.

    front door mus��e Beaux-Arts side along the quais of museum of Fine Arts
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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

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    Jardin du Thabor

    by Mikebond Updated Jul 6, 2009

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    The Jardin du Thabor was the kitchen garden of the Benedictines, who called it like the Palestinian mount. In the 18th century, the garden was opened to the public and today it's the largest park in Rennes. You can find there a French and a botanical garden. Have a look at the gate and at the statues among the flowers (fourth photo).

    the gate flowers flowers statue among the flowers flowers
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    • Architecture

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    Parlement of Brittany

    by codrutz Written Sep 30, 2008

    Rennes is the capital of Brittany (one of the 26 admintrative regions of France). The court of justice was established in 1554 by King Henry II and the name was the "Parlement" of Brittany (Bretagne). In 1561 the Parlement was set up in Rennes so it needed a building. Drafting the plans alone took 50 years, then another 90 years to build - 1618-1709. Fires threatened the building in 1720 as well as in present days in 1994, when some 17th century wood works in the Pas Perdus room dissappeared in the fire. The interior of the Parlement worth a visit.

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    Palais du Commerce

    by codrutz Written Sep 30, 2008

    This is I guess the largest building in Rennes. Built on the bank of the Villaine river relatively recent - 1885-1929 - it was raised to obscure the smaller buildings behind and give the city a more modern look.

    It housed the commodities exchange and the postal and telegraph office. Now it's the post office.

    Palais du Commerce

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    Notre-Dame-en-Sainte-Mélaine

    by Mikebond Updated Nov 8, 2006

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    This church is not important, but you will see it when you go to spend some time at the jardin du Thabor (see next tip).
    Sainte-Mélaine was the church of the Benedictine abbey The only original parts that have remained until today are the transept (11th century) and the tower (14th century) because all the rest was rebuilt in the 17th century.

    Sainte-M��laine
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    • Architecture

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    Saint-Germain

    by Mikebond Updated Nov 7, 2006

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    Saint-Germain is a Gothic church built in the 15th and 16th centuries. You should look at the large 16th-century window in the right transept, which depicts scenes from the lives of the Virgin, Saint John the Baptist and Jesus Christ. You see it in the second photo and a description of it in the fifth photo of this tip.
    Besides, the third and fourth images in this tip show two modern windows on the nave designed by Max Ingrand (I have never heard of him!).

    Saint-Germain the nave window window description of a window
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    Place des Lices

    by Mikebond Updated Nov 5, 2006

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    Place des Lices is one of the most typical squares and one of my favourite places in Rennes. It was there that knight jousting used to take place in the Middle Ages. After being enlarged in the 16th century, it hosted the hôtels particuliers. They were the residences of members of Parliament built in a kind of medieval-like style. You can still see these half-timbered houses around the square and in some streets nearby. (To be honest, I'm not sure that all of these pictures refer to this square. Some could have been taken in another place).
    Today, place des Lices is one of the main meeting points for the Rennes people. Evidence for this is provided by the many tables outside the bars (see the first, second and fifth photo).
    A very nice location, indeed! Don't miss it!

    Place des Lices Place des Lices Place des Lices Place des Lices Place des Lices
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    Palais Saint-Georges

    by Mikebond Updated Oct 21, 2006

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    Palais Saint-Georges was originally a Benedictine abbey. It was founded in 1032, rebuilt in the following century and completely remade in the 17th century, when it was given its present appearance. Today, the palace houses administration offices.
    Beside photographing the elegant façade of the building, have a look at the gardens and sit down on a bench to enjoy the colourful flowerbeds.

    Palais Saint-Georges Palais Saint-Georges me in front of Palais Saint-Georges the gardens
    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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    Parc Thabor

    by webbygail Written Jun 25, 2006

    Thabor is an interesting park, manicured but quirky. As you enter you see two football fields next to a tree-lined pathway but once you have figured out how to navigate you discover its grandeur. It is more than a pretty park, it has a rose garden that is labelled with official names such as "exciting" or "Princess Diana." You may even find your name. There is a huge bird cage with exotic birds, including Australian ones, which was very exciting for me being millions of miles away from home. The park is very relaxed in the summer and there are designated grassy areas where you can sit or lay on but beware not to step on protected grass areas which are clearly marked, as the park inspector will tell you off! In winter, the park is not as vibrant but if you are in Rennes in winter, you should try to go anyway especially when the rose bush named "exciting" is anything but!

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park
    • Travel with Pets

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    Porte Mordelaise

    by Mikebond Updated Apr 14, 2006

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    Porte Mordelaise is what remains of the 15th-century walls. Once it was the main access to the town and the Duches of Bretagne passed across it to go to the cathedral in order to be crowned. Today, it is not important at all, but it has undoubtedly kept its charm.

    Porte Mordelaise
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    Cathédrale de Saint-Pierre

    by Mikebond Written Apr 14, 2006

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    The cathedral was rebuilt from 1787 to 1844 where the main temples had been erected from the 6th century. The inside has to be very beautiful, with a lot of paintings and decorations, but I haven't got any pictures of it. Maybe we didn't visit the inside, I don't remember. Anyway, enjoy this picture of the outside.

    Cath��drale de Saint-Pierre
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    Vieux Rennes

    by Mikebond Updated Apr 13, 2006

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    Rue du Chapitre, rue de la Psallette, rue du Sauveur and other streets near the cathedral form what remains of ancient Rennes. They are bordered with buildings from the 15th to the 18th centuries, most of which are half-timbered houses, so typical of France. Luckily these streets are close to traffic, so the buildings are protected. This is a very pleasant part of the city.

    rue de la Psallette half-timbered house a door half-timbered house a balcony
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    Rue Saint-Yves

    by Mikebond Written Apr 13, 2006

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    Rue Saint-Yves is another ancient street of Rennes. There lies the Chapelle Saint-Yves, an old chapel that today houses the tourist office and an exhibition about the city. You should visit it if you have time, I think the entry is free.

    the entrance of the tourist office the chapel outside the chapel inside
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    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

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    Palais du Parlement de Bretagne

    by Mikebond Written Apr 5, 2006

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    These pictures show the Palais du Parlement de Bretagne, ("Palace of the Breton Parliament") that houses today the Palais de Justice.
    This building was built between 1618 and 1655 on Salomon de Brosse's projects. It has had a troubled history: after it survived to the huge fire that destroyed most parts of the town in 1720, another fire destroyed almost completely in 1994. Afterwards, it was rebuilt and some of its beautiful decorations and sculptures have been recovered.
    I didn't visit the palace inside because I had little time. I don't know if it is possible to visit it, either.

    Palais du Parlement de Bretagne Palais du Parlement de Bretagne - detail
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    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

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    Hôtel de Ville

    by Mikebond Written Apr 2, 2006

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    Here are some more pictures of the Rennes city hall with details of the beautiful Tour de l'Horloge. While I am watching these photos again, I realize that this palace has absolutely nothing to share with Breton architecture, which proves that Rennes is a Breton city with a lot of French influence.

    H��tel de Ville Tour de l'Horloge Tour de l'Horloge (detail) Tour de l'Horloge (detail)
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    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces

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Rennes Things to Do

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