Tréguier Things to Do

  • Chateau de la Roche Jagu
    Chateau de la Roche Jagu
    by Andrew_W_K
  • St. Ives between Rich & Poor Men (15C)
    St. Ives between Rich & Poor Men (15C)
    by hquittner
  • Knight's Tomb
    Knight's Tomb
    by hquittner

Most Recent Things to Do in Tréguier

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    Chateau De La Roche Jagu

    by Andrew_W_K Written Aug 19, 2009

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    Chateau de la Roche Jagu

    About 6 miles from Treguier is the charming 15th century fortified manor of La Roche Jagu. Made of the local harmonious stone and in a delightfully picturesque setting overlooking the river Trieux it is well worth a visit if you are in the area or passing through.
    Open from spring to autumn I believe the chateau is closed during winter.

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    St.-Tugdual Cathedral: The Modern Stained Glass

    by hquittner Written Oct 7, 2007
    South Transept Window (detail)
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    The information that the church provided states that the once magnificent stained glass of the windows was all destryed in the Rvolution of 1793. Funds to restore the Sacrament chapel was put forward by attorney groups inFrance, Belgium and the USA and put in place in 1937 (artist not named). The replaced glass in the aisles and the splendid South Transept window were by Hubert de Sainte Marie and installed in 1971. The last named window is an allegory of the Vine (the Chruch) but what it nourishes is not clear to us. The aisle picture scenes of the Old Testament (North) and New Testament (South) plus saints lives in the Chancel. Again we cannot identify what we saw.

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    St.-Tugdual Cathedral: The Modern Stained Glass

    by hquittner Written Oct 7, 2007

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    South Transept Window (detail)
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    The information that the church provided states that the once magnificent stained glass of the windows was all destryed in the Rvolution of 1793. Funds to restore the Sacrament chapel was put forward by attorney groups inFrance, Belgium and the USA and put in place in 1937 (artist not named). The replaced glass in the aisles and the splendid South Transept window were by Hubert de Sainte Marie and installed in 1971. The last named window is an allegory of the Vine (the Chruch) but what it nourishes is not clear to us. The aisle picture scenes of the Old Testament (North) and New Testament (South) plus saints lives in the Chancel. Again we cannot identify what we saw.

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    St.-Tugdual Cathedral: There is also Stonecarving

    by hquittner Written Oct 7, 2007

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    Stoup (14C)
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    Not only did the ancient local Bretons master woodcarving, they also learned the art of carving the local granite. The church has many early examples of 14C work in stone. Look at the capitals of the columns especially in the nave and North transept and note the stoup there. Later (15C) in marble was the tomb of Jean V as well as the tracery of the Porch entries and the voussoirs on the Bell Tower. Still further sculptures of that time are in the South aisle: tombs of unidentified knights. Finally in the 20C a tomb was erected in the garden out front (west) for the local writer Anatole Le Braz (d.1926).

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    Visit the Tombs of Jean V and St. Ives in Church

    by hquittner Written Oct 6, 2007

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    Tomb of Jean V of Brittany
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    The most important monument in the Cathedral is that of Jean V Duke of Brittany located in the North aisle and the adjacent Holy Sacrament Chapel. This expansion was built by the Duke (died 1442) who wished to be buried next to the Saint (died 1303). This area continues to be devoted to St. Ives patron of lawyers and notaries. We visited a week after the annual pardon (which occurs every May19) and the altar was still covered with flowers. There are always present votive offerings and plaques ( the modern 1937 glass of the chapel and other restorations were financed by groups of lawyers from America, France and Belgium).

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    St. Tugdual Cathedral: Study the Wood-Carving

    by hquittner Written Oct 6, 2007

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    Pieta (early 16C)
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    Scattered through the church are many examples of old Breton wood carving. Be sure to look in the ambulatory and its chapels (items 1 &2) and in the S. transept (items 3 &4). We are sorry that #3 is so dark (there is a better picture with mikebond). This shows St. Ives between the Rich Man and the Poor Man and is much venerated (15C).

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    St. Tugdual Cathedral: See the Inner Architecture

    by hquittner Written Oct 6, 2007

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    Nave : Lateral elevation
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    The church was built in slow stages from 13-15C and although of consistent style and harmonious, the width of the basy and the piers vary in spacing and form with Gothic arches, triforium and clerestory. Most striking is the apse which has evolved an elaborate frieze below its trigorium with a small echoing on at the clerestory (remember this is carved granite!). The organ sits below the West Front stained glass window. The South Transept window is the best of the modern glass (seen in a separate Tip). The typical ribbed vaulting is colorfully decorated in the chancel, enhanced by many colorful banners.

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    Saint-Tugdual - inside: other attractions

    by Mikebond Updated Oct 6, 2007

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    bishop's throne
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    This tip contains photos that don't fit into any other tip. The first show the bishop's throne. The second depicts paintings of notaries (remember that Saint Yves is their patron saint). However, the most interesting are the last three: they portray some miséricordes ("misericords" in English). The word originally means "mercy", but here it indicates a particular architectural feature of choir seats in France. They are sculptures lying under the seats where priests used sit while they were listening at the mass, and their function was to let old priests lean on them so that they didn't get tired while they were standing. I don't know if I have explained myself well. Anyway, these sculptures are very special and some churches have wonderful ones. These ones are just nice.

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    Saint-Tugdual - inside: Saint Yves

    by Mikebond Updated Oct 6, 2007

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    Saint Yves
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    Here is the saint of this church! As I said before, although the church is dedicated to Saint Tugdual, it has always been important for the huge pilgrimages to honour Saint Yves (1250-1303). He was a priest in Tréguier and devoted himself to the poor and to justice, that is why he is today the patron saint of lawyers and notaries.
    The church houses the original tomb of Saint Yves (second photo of this tip) and a reproduction of his funerary monument, made in the 19th century (the other pics).

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    Enter by the Bell (Transept) Tower Porch

    by hquittner Written Oct 5, 2007

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    The South Transept Window
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    The South Tower is the most prominent part of the Cathedral from the outside. It was added to the base tower in the 18C as an elegant spire. Below it is a large 8-panelled stained glass window. (The other towers were never completed). At the base is a high recessed arched porch with niches for statuary (destroyed or never commissioned). At the back is a double trefoil entry door whose separating column bears a Madonna and Child. The voussoirs of the arches are delicately carved and some 40 carvings survive th ravages of 1793 (I guess the rioters did not own long ladders).

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    Before Entering Study the Peoples' Porch

    by hquittner Updated Oct 5, 2007

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    The Entry
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    As is typical of Breton churches there is a South Porch entry for the common people. This one is located between the South Transept and the West Front. Within the porch are niches for the 12 Apostles. The statues and their bases have been destroyed in 1793 but the canopies are more or less intact. A few of the statues with fragments of their support columns have been recovered and stand awkward and forlorn in the porch accompanied by a damaged Madonna. Some worn elements of other carving are also still visible. Note the similarity in form to the entry on the West Front, but that this porch is larger and subtly more elaborate. Some original paint is still on the vaulting above.

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    Examine the Exterior of the Cathedral St. Tugdual

    by hquittner Written Oct 5, 2007

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    Cathedral-West Front Note S. Tower)
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    The cathedral was built mostly between 1300-1400 of granite, a substance that is difficult to work. It was built upon a Romanesque base still extant as the North (the Hastings Tower) of three square towers along the transept line. The south tower had a spectacular pierced spire added in the 18C (202 ft high). The entries are through porches at the West Front and the South Transept. The Porch on the west descends from the street level to the entry doors where a Madonna and Child stand between the double doors. There are carved niches in the porch without statues probably lost during the devastations of 1793 when the beautiful windows were destroyed.

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    Maison de Renan

    by Mikebond Updated Apr 16, 2006

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    Maison de Renan

    This half-timbered house built in the 16th century was the place where French writer Ernest Renan (1823-92) lived. He was an important author and scientist, but unfortunately he is almost unknown abroad. It is possible to visit the house from April to September, but my parents and I didn't go inside.

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    Saint-Tugdual - inside: the treasure

    by Mikebond Updated Apr 16, 2006

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    Saint Yves's skull
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    The treasure is one of the most interesting parts of the church to visit. These photos show some important pieces you can see there:
    1) a shrine with Saint Yves's skull;
    2) a pictures of the local pardon of 19th May 1947 at which also Monsignor Roncalli, future Pope John XXIII took part;
    3) a chasublier, i.e. a desk with rotating drawer (what is the English equivalent?) containing photos and other stuff;
    4) paraments;
    5) the parish standard, crosses, statues and other things used during the annual pardon.
    That's very beautiful, isn't it? So, don't miss it when you visit the church. And now let's go outside to the cloister.

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    Saint-Tugdual - inside: windows

    by Mikebond Updated Apr 16, 2006

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    holy scenes
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    The bombs of World War II destroyed the windows of the church that have subsequently been replaced with modern ones.
    The window in the first photo depicts holy scenes, but it is very difficult to distinguish the characters due to the art technique. The second windows shows Saint John's death. The third pictures regroupes three windows with paintings about the evil that war brings. The fourth photo should portray Saint Yves, but I'm not sure. Finally, the fifth image show the window of the apse.

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