Vroncourt-la-Côte Travel Guide

  • Don't give your sons. . . .
    Don't give your sons. . . .
    by kokoryko
  • Rue Louise Michel
    Rue Louise Michel
    by kokoryko
  • Roman ruins in Grand
    Roman ruins in Grand
    by kokoryko

Vroncourt-la-Côte Things to Do

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    by kokoryko Updated Feb 5, 2011

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    The fringes of Champagne and Lorraine are home to other great people in French history, and some incredible monuments have been erected as tribute or recognition; the small village of Colombey les deux Eglises gave birth to General De Gaulle, and you cannot miss the monument when you drive on the road between Chaumont and Troyes (picture 1); to me that spoils the countryside, I prefer by far the peaceful rural landscapes (picture 2), or discovering some unexpected roman ruins in a small village (picture 3); this one is Grand (Google Earth : 48°023’ 05” N; 05° 29’ 11”E; have a look at the circular city from above), where you can visit a Roman amphitheatre (too much renovated to my taste), or even see archaeological excavations, live! (picture 4).
    Ah! Other great people! This village (picture 5) gave birth to one of the most famous ladies in history, she is one of the symbols of France, there are thousands of statues representing her in France and in the world! I will have to make a VT page about Jeanne d’Arc!

    Colombey les deux Eglises Easternmost Champagne Landscape Roman ruins in Grand Young archaeologist posing. . And here is Jeanne's birthplace
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  • kokoryko's Profile Photo

    by kokoryko Written Feb 5, 2011

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    The signs disseminated in the village are in fact the most interesting things to look at; they have been erected by the Association Louise Michel, the Tourist commission of Haute Marne, and Champagne Ardennes, and the Amis de la Commune Association. Not sure that Louise, as an Anarchist would have accepted some sponsorship. . ?
    Whatever, there are the signs displaying some of her writings, letters to Victor Hugo, poems, and some strong sentences, like this one (picture 1): country person, don’t give your son to go kill other populations, don’t give your daughter for the master’s pleasures, learn them revolt for finally gaining “la sociale”, the Republic of human gender; my translation is very “soft”. .
    At the lower end of the village is a small monument dedicated to Louise (picture 3), with boards about her life.
    She spent many years in New Caledonia, where the Versailles “republic”, after the defeat of the Commune de Paris sent her in penal colony; her stay there, where she was allowed to teach influenced her a lot about her views of colonialism and humanity (picture 5).
    It is just a little page about a very little village, but the birthplace of a very great woman!

    Louise, on the side of some of her words Another sign Monument to Louise Don't give your sons. . . . The village in the countryside
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  • kokoryko's Profile Photo

    by kokoryko Updated Feb 5, 2011

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    As you have seen in the intro picture, it is really a small village, now, a street, a few houses, a church. . . and that’s it! At Louise’s time, it was more populated and active, but rural exodus did its work here too!
    This village stretches on a slope from where you have a nice view over the Eastern Champagne countryside; small old farmhouses built with dry stone walls, here and there a few flowers (picture 2), a small cemetery (picture 3), at the feet of the church where Louise got her initial education and probably acquired her sense of justice; daughter of a maid and an unknown father, she had a happy childhood in the castle where she was raised, but knew about her social origins; she wrote in her souvenirs that she was “very” Christian in her young days, but learning to know the world, she soon learned that Christian justice was very “oriented”. . .
    You can have a look in the church, an old construction, where a modern altar stands between older statues, and even older stones. . . (picture 4).
    You will see along the way in the village a few signs, like this one (picture 5). That is what the village has to offer; there are officially 25 inhabitants, but a number of houses are now second homes.


    Je n'ai jamais franchi nos paisibles villages
    Et cependant mon front est avide d'orages
    Seigneur, Seigneur mon Dieu, livre mon aile au vent
    Ou bien rends-moi semblable aux paisibles enfants
    Que nulle voix n'appelle, au soir, dans les nuages
    Louise Michel, 1845 (she was 15)

    More about Louise Michel in the website.

    Over the countryside Old walls Little cemetery Inside the church A sign
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