Conflans-Sainte-Honorine Travel Guide

  • Is upside down better?
    Is upside down better?
    by kokoryko
  • View of the Seine at Conflans Ste Honorine
    View of the Seine at Conflans Ste...
    by kokoryko
  • At the Museum entrance
    At the Museum entrance
    by kokoryko

Conflans-Sainte-Honorine Things to Do

  • Just for pleasure: more boats. .

    On the right bank of the Seine, a few hundred metres upstream of the village centre (market, cafés) is “Port St Nicolas” where hundreds of barges are moored, one against the other, and they are very pleasant to look at; a slow walk along the river allows to have a look at boats, people living on the boats, how they decorate them, a sort of a...

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  • The veterans and Madelon

    Le Pardon National de la Batellerie is firstly a commemorative event, celebrated by a mass and ceremonies where the veterans come for an official meeting (a V(eteran) T(errific) meeting? Ooops!), lay a wreath at the war memorial, listen to military music, and pay respect to the dead.Well, that is only a ceremony, the dead, the heroes, those who...

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  • Visit the village

    Conflans Ste Honorine is an old village, as the Montjoie Tower indicates, but there is not a lot left from the old village; walking in the streets is a bit disappointing, but the steep small paths linking the banks of the Seine to the high village are nice to walk; What you foreigner may also discover, when you walk in the periphery of the village,...

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  • More boats

    Looking at the boats, you can make some funny games, like finding the most exotic name for a boat, find strange combinations of names or colours, look at funny decors, look at gardens which grow on the boats, etc, etc, your choice; I am sure kids would like a lot look at the details of the boats. A few pictures where you see Allah is great, little...

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  • Life on boats

    Walking on the banks you meet painters, but you certainly will be amazed and surprised (at least I was, but I usually do not live close to water!) by the decorated barges where people live; finally, it is their houses, and they live like you and me, just their house is different; they decorate their barges, enjoy the sunny days and make barbecues...

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  • Walk on the banks

    You certainly have seen in museums, art books, magazines some of the famous paintings of Sisley, Monet, Renoir, Cezanne. . . . If the light of the Seine inspired lots of painters in the end of 19th century, there are still some imitators or followers and you may have a chance to meet one of them on the banks of the Seine in Conflans.The painting...

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  • Vintage boats

    When you walk on the banks of the Seine in Conflans, you may have the luck to see a few vintage river boats or historical boats. These are not very old ones, but some of them are more than 100 years old, and it is interesting to look how the barges have changed in one century.The “Jacques” (first picture), is a steam powered tug boat built in 1904,...

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  • Castle, park, and scenic views on the...

    When you visit the museum, you will certainly not miss a short visit to the park, located behind the castle and have a walk along a path, dominating the river. You already have seen the façade of the Chateau du Prieuré (previous tip), and now you walk on a small alley above the Seine and have a wide view on the river (picture 1); on the southern...

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  • Everything you want to know about boats,...

    The museum tells stories of river boating and of the actors of these stories; we now see huge boats, container carriers, raw material carriers, huge passenger boats, but they are all powered by big Diesel engines, and before by steam engines. . . . And before? Not so long time ago, going upstream, it was human power, like the main picture suggests...

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  • The boatmen had strange customs

    The capital city of river boating could not do less than having a museum fully dedicated to river boating; this museum, created in 1967, settled in the “Chateau du Prieuré”, high on a hill above the Seine, is now the most important museum of France dedicated to inland boating and has been listed in the French “Musée d’intérêt national” list of...

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  • Outdoor mass at the National Pardon

    It is not a good idea to make pictures of people praying, behave like a tourist during a mass, so there will be no pictures taken during the mass, only few minutes after it finished.The author of these lines is not religious at all, but has respect for beliefs, religions (as long there is no proselytism!), arrived a bit late and “attended” the mass...

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  • St Nicolas

    As written previously, St Nicolas is also the holy saint Patron of the fluvial boatmen. Look at the smiling bishop on picture 1, he is holding a barge in his right hand, he protects the boatmen! St Nicolas is commonly represented as a bishop, with or without mitre, holding a crosier, and here the book is replaced by the barge; ah, the three little...

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  • The holy book is laid on an anchor

    When you visit a boat, you usually see the anchors outside; here is one inside, but it is the lectern for the holy books. . . . Does this mean you get “anchored” to the holy faith when listening to the holy words the priest reads from the holy book? Is this a symbol? This chapel is interesting to visit, with a modern wooden sculpture of St Nicolas...

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  • The church of the boatmen

    There are the medieval Tour Montjoie and the St Maclou church in the background of picture 1, but the tip is about a chapel which you see blue and white, decorated with flags, with a Christ next to the entrance.This boat, built of cement in 1919, was a goods transportation barge till 1932, and in 1935, the priest Joseph Bellanger purchased a barge...

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  • Decorated boats

    For the “Pardon de la Batellerie”, people decorate their boats, goods transportation barges, passenger ships, house boats, whatever. A feast of colours, a bit too much publicity with these flags, but well, it looks very pretty and refreshing in the blue sky, above the calm waters.What decorates the boats is all these flags, publicity, national...

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Conflans-Sainte-Honorine Hotels

Conflans-Sainte-Honorine Restaurants

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    by kokoryko Updated Oct 10, 2009

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    Along quai de la République are a number of cafés and restaurants and at the Eastern end, you arrive on Place Fouillère, where you will see restaurants with terraces laid out under plane and chestnut trees: a very inviting place for a lunch or a drink on a sunny day!
    Le Bouquet is one of them, quite simple, with little, but good choice of French fresh, tasty food. On top of that, you can enjoy there a big range of rosé (first picture) or white wines; red wine, beer, soft drinks are available, too, of course.
    You sit in the shade, order for drinks, quickly, as the staff is efficient, and make your choice from the slate board: mainly grilled meat, tartars, served with vegetables and very big salads; here it is “fast food” in French way: no junk food, but you also can choose from the regular menu.
    Very good food for reasonable price. Out of lunch time, just a drink in the shade is enjoyable.
    There are a few more “upscale” restaurants in this area of Conflans, (picture 4), but I did not try one of them.

    Sun today! Ros��! View from the street (Quay!) All is written on the blackboard Close to Tour Montjoie.
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Conflans-Sainte-Honorine Transportation

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    by kokoryko Written Oct 10, 2009

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    Best way to reach Conflans is by train, very easily from Gare St Lazare in Paris, or with RER Line A (A3, direction Cergy)
    From Gare St Lazare there is a train every 15-20 mn (30-40 mn early morning, late evening), and it brings you to Conflans in less than 30 mn
    St Lazare is centrally located in Paris, in the Opera quarter, and the Conflans station is about 15 mn walk from the Seine banks, walking down the streets, passing by the city hall.

    The RER takes you to the Conflans-Fin-d’Oise station, outside the city centre, but as fast as the SNCF train.

    20 km far from the centre of Paris, but you already pass near wheat fields illuminated by poppies (picture 1), see the Seine at Argenteuil, not like Claude Monet, but at least you see it there (picture 2) when the train crosses the bridge. . . . :)
    On Sundays, the station is very quiet (picture 3). . . . . and when you leave it and walk down in the village you pass by the typical third republic style city hall (picture 4)

    4.30 Euros, one way.

    Impressionist poppies ? Platform; quiet, isn't it? City hall
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