Belfort Things to Do

  • Belfort Citadel
    Belfort Citadel
    by balhannah
  • Belfort Citadel
    Belfort Citadel
    by balhannah
  • Belfort Citadel
    Belfort Citadel
    by balhannah

Most Recent Things to Do in Belfort

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    OLD TOWN OF BELFORT

    by balhannah Updated Nov 6, 2015

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    I went for a walk around the town square and found some nice buildings with plenty of outdoor seating.
    The most impressive building for me was the Hotel De Ville (Town Hall) which dates from 1721-1724. On the ground floor is "Salle Kléber," typical of French art in the second half of the 18C. On the first floor is the trophy room and paintings of local history.
    Opening hours :
    weekdays 8am-12.15pm, 1pm-6pm, Sat and 1st Sun of every month 8.30am-noon - closed Bank Holidays. Free entry.

    Next, I found a fountain with an octagonal basin of red sandstone. Water to this fountain comes from a perforated steel pipe column then flows out from three bronze-like dogs.
    The is the Fountain of Dogs, created by Paul Rebeyrolle for the city of Belfort in 1986.

    Another impressive building built from pink sandstone, was St. Christopher's Cathedral in the Place d'Armes. This imposing classical building was originally an abbey church. Construction began in 1727, church services were held from 1850 even though the cathedral wasn't fully completed until 1845 when the south tower was completed. The cathedral organ dating from 1752, is one of the finest organs in France. Sculptures and many art works by Franche-Comté artists adorn the interior of the cathedral.
    The church of Saint-Christophe was made ​​a cathedral in 1979.
    Open - 10 - 6.30pm

    .

    Fountain of Dogs St. Christopher's Cathedral
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    THE LION OF BELFORT

    by balhannah Updated Nov 5, 2015

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    The Lion of Belfort is what else I wanted to see only I was too early for it to be open. This monumental sculpture was created by Frédéric Bartholdi, who also sculptered the Statue of Liberty in New York.

    The idea of the Monument came about as a way of recognizing the victims of the siege between 1870 - 71.
    From 3 November 1870 to 13 February 1871, Belfort was under siege from 40,000 Prussians. Belfort surrendered the city by order of the French government. Thanks to its courageous resistance, Belfort remained French whereas parts of Alsace and Lorraine were annexed to Germany.

    Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi was consulted to work on the project. He disliked the idea of a simple column, instead envisioned a colossal lion carved into and under the limestone rock of the Citadel, a lion that would be "harassed, cornered and terrible still in its fury"

    In 1873 his proposal was accepted and work began. There were many changes made to the depiction of the lion, which should "glorify the energetic defense" rather than call to mind a victory or defeat.
    The Lion was finished in 1880 and is entirely made of red sandstone from the Vosges mountains where each block was individually sculpted then moved under Belfort castle to be assembled. The colossal work is 22 meters long and 11 meters high.

    Though originally never inaugurated, this oversight was corrected with the Lion being inaugurated in 2011. It was declared a "Historic Monument" in 1931.

    The lion symbolizes the heroic French resistance during the Siege of Belfort, a 103-day Prussian assault (from December 1870 to February 1871). Instead of facing Prussia to the east as was intended, it was turned the other way because of German protests

    Opening hours :
    From 1st October to 31 March:
    - 10:00-12:00/14:00-17:00

    From 1st April to 31 May:
    - 9:00-12:00/2-6pm

    From 1st June to 31 August:
    9am - 7pm

    From 1st to 30 September:
    9am-6pm
    admission :

    ADMISSION Rate : 1€ on Tuesdays
    From wednesday to Monday :5€ (pass Lion and Museum)

    Lion of Belfort
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    LA PORTE DE BRISACH

    by balhannah Written Nov 5, 2015

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    The La Porte de Brisach (1687-1703) was actually one of two entrances to access inside the walls of the citadel and reach the old town, once protected by high walls. The other door, called the "Gateway to France" was destroyed in 1892.
    Left standing is the last architectural testimony of the original access to the citadel. The door is massive in appearance, intentionally built that way by Vauban to embrace the magnificence of Louis XIV. It was built in this location so it was under the protection of a semi-circular lookout post, which was positioned overlooking the moat. A central medallion bearing three flowers is framed by a bundle of flags and trophies, above is the date 1687.
    The triangular pediment positioned above the door is adorned with a sun and motto of King Louis XIV, "Nec pluribus impar" (Above All).

    The gate of Brisach is classified, like the Citadel, under the Historic Monuments since 1907. This gate, as with the other gates into the old town, are only wide enough for one car to pass through. Check whether there is a no entry sign or not. We stopped away from the gate and I walked back to see the interior workings and the very old doors.

    La Porte de Brisach La Porte de Brisach La Porte de Brisach
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    THE BELFORT CITADEL

    by balhannah Written Nov 5, 2015

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    One of my reasons for coming to Belfort was to see the well preserved citadel, also known as the Citadel of Liberty, one of the most imposing of all Vauban's designs. It was Vauban's defensive system that allowed the soldiers within the edifice to hold off a 103-day siege in 1870.

    The Citadel and fortifications are accessible free of charge.

    The Citadel was until the 17th century a classic feudal Castle. As it is perched high on a hill and I was in the historic city centre, my walk on a cold, wet morning was fairly steep uphill one all the way to the top.
    Once there, walk the city walls and follow the main corridor to the Cour d'honneur to reach the panoramic terrace for a 360 ° degree view of all the fortress as well as the forts, the city of Belfort, the villages and the Vosges mountains. The bad weather spoilt the views I had hoped to see.
    Open - every day from 6:00 to 6:00 pm

    There is more to see and a good way to see it is by buying the MULTIO-SITE PASS.
    It is valid one year from the date of purchase, each site can be visited once.

    COST €7 / person, free for children under 18 (discounted at €5).

    The Lion terrace
    Open every day from 10:00 to 12:30 and 2 - 6pm
    Access with the pass' multi-site (€7)

    Large underground:
    Open daily (except Tuesday) from 10:00 to 12:30 and 2 - 6pm
    Access with the pass' multi-site (€7)
    + 33 (0) 3 84 54 26 78

    Museum of history and space Bartholdi:
    Open daily (except Tuesday) from 2 - 6pm
    Access with the pass' multi-site (€7) or the upper Rhine Museum Pass
    + 33 (0) 3 84 54 25 51

    Museum of Modern Art
    Open daily (except Tuesday) from 2 - 6pm
    Access with the pass' multi-site (€7)
    8 rue Mulhouse 90 000 BELFORT
    + 33 (0) 3 84 90 40 70

    Museum of fine arts:
    Open daily (except Tuesday) from 2 - 6pm
    Access with the pass' multi-site (€7)
    Rue Georges Pompidou 90 000 BELFORT
    + 33 (0) 3 84 54 27 87

    Belfort Citadel Belfort Citadel Belfort Citadel Belfort Citadel Belfort Citadel
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    La Citadelle Belfort

    by black_mimi99 Updated May 2, 2012

    The citadel has protected this important route since the 17th century, with the fortifications improved by Vauban in the 17th century. A visit inside the fortress is a good way to understand the structure and the strength of the defences, which are extremely substantial, while it is in aerial photos that you can best see the characteristic pentagonal structure of the Vauban fortifications.

    The citadel was then further reinforced in the early 19th century, with a ring of defences a couple of kilometres outside Belfort, parts of which can be seen for example at the Fort du Salbert.

    mi
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    LA PORTE DE BRISACH

    by black_mimi99 Updated May 2, 2012

    The Porte de Brisach (1687-1703) is an entrance through the fortifications which grants access to the heart of Old Town; it was designed by Vauban in 1687.

    The section above the door of the Porte de Brisach is embellished with a central medallion bearing three fleur-de-lis bordered by flags and trophies. The date 1687 is inscribed above it. The pediment is engraved with a sun, the symbol of Louis XIV, and his motto, "Nec pluribus impar" ("not unequal to many"). The Porte de Brisach and its surroundings were registered as Historic Monuments in 1907 and 1913.

    LA PORTE DE BRISACH
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    THE "Quand-même" STATUE

    by black_mimi99 Updated May 2, 2012

    The "Quand-Même" statue located right in front of St Christopher's Cathedral was sculpted by Antonin Mercié (1845-1916).
    The artist portrayed an Alsatian woman in traditional clothing; one of her hands supports a fallen man while the other brandishes his rifle as she turns toward the authors of such misfortune.
    The base of the sculpture features the medallions of Thiers, who did not want to give Belfort to Germany, and Colonel Denfert-Rochereau, who triumphantly defended it.

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    Lion of Belfort

    by black_mimi99 Updated May 2, 2012

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    The Lion of Belfort is a sculpture by Frédéric Bartholdi, architect of the Statue of Liberty in New York, located in Belfort, France. It was finished in 1880 and is entirely made of pink sandstone. The blocs it is made of were individually sculpted then moved under Belfort castle to be assembled. The sculpture is 22 meters long and 11 meters high and dominates the local landscape.

    The lion symbolizes the heroic resistance of Belfort during a 103 days long Prussian assault (from December 1870 to February 1871). The city was protected from 40,000 Prussians by merely 17,000 men (only 3,500 were from the military) lead by Colonel Denfert-Rochereau.

    Instead of facing Prussia to the east as was intended, it was turned the other way because of German protests.

    mi
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    La Citadelle

    by Mikebond Written Apr 18, 2009

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    The Citadelle you see today was built on the location of the 13th-century castle from 1637 on. Ingeneer Vauban also took place in the construction, but today's appearance of the fortress comes from the 19th-century renovation works.
    In the barracks you can visit the Musée d'Art et d'Histoire.
    From the citadel, you can enjoy a beautiful panorama over the town (second photo).

    citadelle panorama
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    The city of the Lion

    by Mikebond Updated Apr 18, 2009

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    The main attraction of Belfort is the Lion sculptured by Auguste Bartholdi, the author of the Statue of Liberty in New York. The sculpture has become increasingly famous, so that Belfort is now known as "La Cité du Lion".
    The project was proposed in 1878 and the statue was inaugurated on 29 August 1880, but without an official ceremony due to political reasons. The lion is a symbol of Belfort's resistance to the Prussian attacks in 1870-71. It proved so succesful that the Parisians (who can never be second to anyone!) wanted a copy of it, erected in 1879 in a square that will later become Place Denfert-Rochereau.
    The lion can be visited from 10 to 19 in summer and with shorter opening times in the rest of the year.

    Lion de Belfort
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    St Christopher's Cathedral

    by black_mimi99 Written Nov 25, 2007

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    The cathedral was built as a church between 1727 and 1750 by the businessman Henri Schuller.
    It was built of red sandstone excavated from the quarry at Offremont, three kilometres from Belfort.
    Although the church opened for worship in 1750, the north tower was not completed until 1845.

    It contains an organ by the organ-builder Joseph Valtrin, installed in 1752 and now classed as an historic monument in its own right.

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    On the Way

    by black_mimi99 Updated May 2, 2012

    From here its the street to castle of citadelle... And walking around in this street, we can enjoy many old houses and view.

    lio - mi
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    Tank

    by black_mimi99 Written Nov 25, 2007

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    I find this tank around the castle before enter to the castle... and my imagine play in my mind about this tank when world war.... peace...

    me and the tank...

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