ARCHITECTURE, Rouen

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  • Place de la Rougemare
    Place de la Rougemare
    by zadunajska8
  • ARCHITECTURE
    by RACCOON1
  • ARCHITECTURE
    by RACCOON1
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    Place de la Rougemare

    by zadunajska8 Written May 23, 2013
    Place de la Rougemare

    Favorite thing: The Place de la Rougemare in Rouen has some lovely examples of the half timbered buildings and stone buildings which fill Rouen's old centre. Whilst there are plenty of examples of such buildings I liked this 'Place' as it seemed to be a little off the tourist track and was quieter and just seemed very residential and 'real french'.

    The two buildings either side of the Rue du Vert Buisson which heads north from the Place de la Rougemare are particularly interesting and are the ones in my photo.

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    Tower near the Gros Horloge

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Rouen has been severely hit by collateral damages from D-day and the bombing destroyed many ancient buildings. Restoration of the most prominent pieces of architecture took years and was (nearly) finished very recently. Minor buildings have been either erased or are still under reconstruction, 50 years later, as this tower.

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    19th century ?

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: From what I have shown on other tips, it might seem that in Rouen, there are either very old remains of the past or very modern buildings. Actually, in some streets that are never visited by tourists, there are buildings of other periods, such as this one that must have been built at the end of the19th or the beginning of the 20th century. But in Rouen (not only in Rouen !), that kind of building does not interest anybody ! May be in 50 years, when most of these buildings will have been destroyed, we will miss them. Perhaps !

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    Modern behind an ancient doorway

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Actually, even in the modern building itself shown on the previous picture, there is a blend of modern and ancient or better a pinch of ancient among the modern : an ancient building has been destroyed in 1944 but its doorway has been rebuilt to be the entrance into the brand new buildings.

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    Palais de Justice, inner passage.

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: The “salle des Procureurs” is not used any more for its original purpose, but this passage leads to a part of the “Palais de Justice” that is actually working. I guess the door should have been closed. It was open, so I went and found myself in a place where a dozen of "customers" (if I can say so !) of justice were queuing and did not seem very happy with it. I did not take any picture, that would have been improper, and withdraw quickly.

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    P. de Justice, side wall of Salle des Procureurs

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: The “Salle des Procureurs” (the Prosecutors Hall) was nearly entirely destroyed by 1944 bombings. It took many years to rebuild it. The outer walls have been rebuilt with their own carved stones. Here, one of the side walls, at the bottom of the Salle des Procureurs. It has been rebuilt almost identically with its delicate stone lace on the second level of windows.

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    Palais de Justice, Salle des Procureurs

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: The roof of the “Salle des Procureurs” had been treated in a modern style that fits perfectly with the old buildings : from outside, it is covered with slates, from inside, it seems to be a boat upside down.
    It is no more used as the Prosecutors Hall but host a show (center of the picture) on the destructions and on the rebuilding.

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    La Fierté Saint Romain

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: An amazing little building called La Fierté Saint Romain (Saint Romain's pride) has been built against the Halles aux Toiles. It was built during the Renaissance in a Greco-Roman style. It contained the relics of Saint Romain

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    La Halle aux Toiles

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: La Halle aux toiles (Tissues Hall) was built in the 16th century for the trade of tissues, linen, etc... It was severely damaged in 1944 and rebuilt. The front, shown here, shows a whole set of high windows, topped by a large slate covered roof. It is now used mainly for art expositions.

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    Maisons à colombage

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Before 1520 the stages in half-timbered houses were often "en encorbellement" (corbelled construction). After 1520, it was forbidden.

    As the whole frame is of wood (often oak), it is strong but can distort somehow. Look at the strange shape of the main horizontal beam of the central house !

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    Saint Maclou square and corbelled house

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Half-timbered houses are made of two parts. Thick standing beams and string-pieces (horizontal beams) are arranged on a stone basement (to insulate from the soil dampness) to give a stiff frame on which the wooden floors are set. This frame is not stiff enough and has to be strengthened by smaller logs (colombes) arranged in different ways, that help for the stability of the whole. When they are oblique, they are called "écharpes" (slings), when two are crossed they are "Croix de Saint André" (Saint Andrew crosses).

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    Close-up on the red and white house

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: At the turn of the 19th century, it looked fashionable to add fancy small towers that had no real purpose. That was only to make it beautiful and give a “Renaissance” look. At least, that was what they thought !

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    Near rue Martainville, side of saint Maclou

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Near rue Martainville, by the side of saint Maclou, close to a traditional half-timbered house painted in black a house that should have been built at the turn of the 19th century is trying to look different and smart, by alternate use of red and of white bricks.

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    Église Saint Maclou, Rouen's decayed Mankenpiss

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: At the corner of Église Saint Maclou, between the front and the north side, the figure of a poor decayed young boy is watering permanently as the Bruxelle's famous Mankenpiss. It is not in very good condition and has even lost the most important part of his anatomy, which had to be replaced by stainless iron prosthesis.

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    Église Saint Maclou, Perron memorial

    by JLBG Updated Nov 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: The association of the Perron families of America has set on September 10th 1993 this slate that says :

    ”Homage to Pierre Dugrenier and Marie-Thérèse Grenet, married here on August 9th 1711 and to their son Joseph, married in New-France in 1742, ancestor to the Dugrenier and Dugrenier called Perron of America”*.

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