Fun things to do in Haute-Normandie

  • The waterlilies
    The waterlilies
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  • The Water Gardens
    The Water Gardens
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  • Musée des Beaux-Arts
    Musée des Beaux-Arts
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Haute-Normandie

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    Abbey Saint George de Boscherville

    by gwened Written May 19, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    another masterpiece abbey you all need to see, Open every day except for 25th December and 1st January. From 1st November to 31st March: from 14h to 17h. From 1st April to 31st October: from 9h to 18h30.
    Admission is - From 1st April to 31st October: 6€
    - From 1st November to 31st March: 5.50€

    guide yourselves with the panels for do it yourself and see the areas marked
    The abbey church and the 12C chapter house,
    The late 17C monastic monument,
    The 13C Tancarville family chapel,
    The French-style gardens,
    The panoramic view over the Seine Valley,
    Temporary exhibitions.

    You have the buildings of the abbey Church, the capitols room,monastic building,Cloister,chapelle des chambellans, and the 17C gardens.

    a bit of history I like
    The Abbey was built from the 12C to the 13C on the site of an ancient pagan temple. Archaeological excavations undertaken in 1981 revealed the presence of a Gallic fanum from the end of the 1C BC and a Christian Funeral Chapel of the 7C.

    However, she was preceded in the 11C by a collegiate church by Raoul Fitzgerald the Chamberlain, Chamberlain to the Duke of Normandy. Raoul establish a college of canons at Boscherville can be explained "presumably because his ancestors were based in the small St. George Chapel located within the walls of the manoir house. His son William de Tancarville is replaced by a benedictine Abbey, after in "expelled the canons'. In 1113 sees the arrival of Benedictine monks coming from the Abbey of Saint-Evroult (Orne) which replace the canons.

    In 1235, the vault of the nave frame is replaced by a gothic stone arch. Around 1250, the Abbey which includes 24 monks, the 6 in other Priories, expects more then settled . During the wars of religion, the Abbey was sacked three times by the huguenots: in 1562, in 1570 (Chapterhouse) and in 1590 (logis of the Abbot). In 1659, the Abbey is reformed by the Maurists. In 1690, the Maurists built the convent buildings.

    Under the French Revolution, the municipality of Saint-Martin-de-Boscherville decides to use the Abbey Church Saint-Georges for the practice of worship, the Church Saint-Martin was judged to be too small and eccentric.

    During work in the Chapter Hall in 1978, was found a beautiful butt of Abbot serious and stamped brass, dating from the beginning of the 13C.

    another jewel to see and much preserved.

    Abbey Saint George de Boscherville fr high gardens the 17C potager and gardens the salle des Chapitre or chapter house
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    Abbey at Jumiéges

    by gwened Written May 19, 2014

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    a wonderful abbey destroyed during the French revolution, never rebuilt but still traces of its once grand statute.
    you have the area all to yourself. It is open every day from 9h30 to 18h30 from April 15 to september 15, and from 9h30-13h and 14h30-17h30 from April 14 to September 16; admission is 6€ adults as of today, check the site for the latest

    the abbey was founded by Saint Philibert,son of the Frankish Count of Gascogne around 654AD.Burn by Vikings in 841, and rebuilt by William 1er by 934. The abbot Robert de Jumièges dit « Champart » had it rebuilt between 1040–1052AD. Went thru many events of destruction until finally the French revolution was sold to private hands, who could not keep it up. It is now part of the local government départment Seine-Maritime no 76.

    It is compose of the Church of St Pierre, and the abbey Church of Notre Dame, a sight to see and glad many were saved from this destruction of a wonderful historical building

    abbey Jumi��ges front tour lanterne at church St Pierre central nave inside abbey of Jumi��ges inside ruins of abbey of Jumi��ges abbey church at Jumi��ges
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    Palais Bénédictine, Fécamp

    by gwened Written May 6, 2014

    a must a wonderful place to visit. I been here then came with the boys and love it, whenever in the area do stop by;more info on the tourist office in French
    http://www.fecamptourisme.com/culture_patrimoine/musees.php

    A visit here allows you to discovered the distillery and know about the liquor/ It ,also, houses a museum of sacre arts with paintings, sculptures, enamels, manuscripts, leather and iron Tools and conptemporary arts exhibitions. Its a real littel Cluny.

    a bit on the faboulous architecture;the Palace is a blend of tradition and extravagance. It was commissioned by Alexandre-Prosper le GRand who was a big fan of art; He wanted to create a hybrid space combining art and industry and also to anchor its liqueur in a local monastic tradition.

    Work began in 1882, and it was opened first in 1888. But, devastated four years later by a fire, it was then rebuilt in its present form in architecture combining neo-Gothic and neo-renaissance, characteristic style of eclecticism, trend of Historicism that crosses throughout the 19C, before the emergence of the new art that the style of the Palace is also reference.

    A bit of interior description. A room tells the story of the liquor and another gathers some 600 counterfeit victim Benedict, which was one of the most copied liqueurs in the world. Plants are presented under the canopy of trees garden. In the more classical side, the Museum has a large collection of art from the 14-15-16C, partly from the founder's personal collections, represented at the centre of a large stained glass window in glorious renovator of the liquor that made his fortune...There is also a gallery of contemporary art exhibitions open to the public.

    The Museum is composed of rooms dedicated to the ancient and medieval art whose many elements from the old Abbey. They contain various collections of enamels and ivories, the library comes in part from the Abbey of Fécamp, a collection of ironwork - acquired in a chateau of the Loire - paintings, mostly on wood, attributed to french, Italian, German and Flemish artists.

    The centrepiece is the äbtestube, whose main interest lies in its stained glass, representing the home of King François Ier by the monks of Fécamp in 1534 and statues of some Abbots who have marked the Abbey of Fécamp. The 'room of spices' is devoted in part to the different plants and spices included in the composition of the Benedictine. Although the exact recipe for this liquor is kept secret, we know the ingredients that compose it: 27 plants and spices, detailed on a display.

    Below this Hall lie the distillery and the cellars, where is developed and then kept the benedictine, but the bottling has more place within these walls.
    The last room is located on the ground floor, 'contemporary space': a large exhibition hall which hosts the greatest artists of our time, alongside the bar and veranda to taste products, then the boutique.

    All very nice with great taste, again a must to see;

    Palais B��n��dictine entrance the courtyard and stairs of the B��n��dictine ceilings of palais de la B��n��dictine The palais de la B��n��dictine arriving
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    Abbatiale de la Trinité, Fécamp

    by gwened Written May 6, 2014

    This is a nice building abbey de la Trinité at Fécamp in Haute Normandie. One of the pleasant towns in the region.
    It has the interesting story of a cerf or deer sculpture not really sure how it was done or when.! It has a long history of NOrmandy within it, and nice cloisters and organ not to mention the main character William the Conqueror.

    a bit of history I like
    The construction of the shrine began in 658AD around the relic of the precious blood, entrusted according to legend in the sea by Isaac, son of Joseph of Arimathea, and come aground miraculously on the beaches of the Pays de Caux. It was the work of Waneng, count of Caux, who decided with the help of Marissa and Ouen creation in Fécamp to a monastery of nuns, placed under the rule of St. Benedict, and according to the texts of the 9C on one of the fields of Waneng. In 665 the first Abbey is dedicated. Hildemarque of Bordeaux is the first Abbess
    From the 9C, the first Viking raids began, and the Abbey was devastated in may 841. The nuns abandoned Abbey in the last quarter of the 9C. They transferred the relics of saint Waneng in Ham

    William Longsword decided the construction of a Palace at Fécamp, near ruins, remains of the first monastery. He rebuilt an oratory dedicated to the Trinity, included within the walls of its residence. Richard Ier is building a new Trinity Church consecrated by Dudo of Saint-Quentin in 990 by Robert the Dane, Archbishop of Rouen, and served by twelve canons regular instead of the nuns, transferred to Montivilliers. The collegiate church, nothing remains today.

    Richard II of Normandy turns in 1001 the collegiate church in benedictine Abbey of men and appealed to head it William of Volpiano, Abbot of Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, to help re-establish a monastic community worthy of this Name. Shortly thereafter, Volpiano arrived at Fécamp with a handful of Cluniac monks. Thanks to the privilege of exemption, Fécamp became a center of monastic reform in Normandy.

    At Easter of the year 1066, Guillaume the Conqueror installed his court at Fécamp after the Abbot of Fécamp has funded the conquest of England by William.

    Guillaume de Rots, third Abbot of Fécamp launches between 1087 and 1099 reconstruction of the Abbey Church. A new Gothic church was then built by the Abbot Henri Sully and Raoul of Argences. With the death of Henri de Sully in 1187, a nave of five bays draft should be nearing completion. Raoul of Argences double the number of spans but does not see its completion. A document the facade with towers and five adjacent spans attributed to Raoul of Argences. Dendrochronology has dated the skeleton of the western part of the nave in 1227/1228. It is completed in the 13C.

    Duremont Gilles, Abbot in 1423, and its sub-prior claustral Jean de Bouesgue are reported as judges for the condemnation of Jeanne of Arc.

    In the 18C, the monks of Saint-Maur settle down and build a new order. The French revolution, the monastery was completely devastated and last religious left shortly after.

    a marvel to see, a must. dept tourist office in English
    http://www.normandie-tourisme.fr/Abbatiale-de-la-Sainte-Trinite/PCU/FECAMP/fiche-PCUNORM00FS000C7-2.html

    Abbey of Sainte Trinit�� nave the organ of Sainte Trinit�� the baldaquin at the choir of  Sainte Trinit�� the nave to organ at Sainte Trinit��
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    Abbey Church of Saint Taurin, Evreux

    by gwened Written May 6, 2014

    This is a wonderful Church and Worth a detour, I have been in the city but cannot find more pictures, its one of the cities I do stopped by often.
    ITs one of the highlights of visiting the city so highly recommended on your way to from Paris and Normandy.

    Saint Taurin was the first bishop of Évreux. We know nothing of him otherwise that the Duke of Normandy Richard The Fearless created the Saint-Taurin Abbey towards the middle of the 10C.

    From fighting of the rivalry between the Kings of France and the Dukes of Normandy became Kings of England they almost entirely ruined it. The Abbey Church was rebuilt, but still us have a few novels elements from the 12C. During the hundred years war, it was burned, this time by the French and King John the Good because Evreux belongs to Charles the Bad, King of Navarre. Need to rebuild largely the building, which will benefit from the economic recovery enjoyed by the Kingdom of France after the hundred years war.

    The Abbey then falls into decay. In 1642, the congregation of Saint-Maur takes possession. As the abbey fell into ruins, the Maurists are forced to shoot the last three bays of the nave. At the beginning of the 18C, they built the new facade . The French Revolution hunting the last monks; the Church becomes an ammunition dump storage . In 1801, she is returned to worship as a parish.

    Saint-Taurin Church combines Romanesque of the 12C, Gothic elements of the 15C, and the parties Renaissance. Apart from the famous hunting, it has a beautiful canopy of the 15C in the choir, enriched with stained-glass windows of the 19C and the contemporary stained glass windows by Max Ingrand.

    abbey church of Saint Taurin
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    Maison Claude Monet

    by gwened Updated Apr 10, 2014

    this is the pilgrimage of all lovers of the impressionist painting school and especially of local leyend Claude Monet. this is his history and my hommage. I used to go here a lot for even lunch or see the museum when lived not too far.

    The House where Claude Monet lived from 1883 to 1926, is refitted as he lived it ,keeping the pink plaster, repainted in the colors of his palette (doors and Green Shutters; yellow bright chrome dining room decorated with prints Japanese from the 18th and 19th centuries the dominant blue, kitchen with its tiled walls of faience blue and white ceramic of Rouen, and sky blue lacquered furniture. Same for the garden, he diverted a branch of the Epte to power a pond crossed by the Japanese bridge. Collector of horticultural journals, he shows himself perfectionist for his garden: engaging up to seven gardeners, which is daily to remove drops of rain or dew on water lilies. When the death of Claude Monet, December 5, 1926, Michel, his only surviving son, inherits the property of Giverny, the paintings contained therein and the extensive collection of Japanese prints. Preferring running safaris in Africa, it is not attracted by the family home. White Monet-Hoschedé, daughter of Alice and widow of Jean, the eldest son of Monet, maintains the House and the garden, with the help of the head gardener Lebret. White died in 1947, the garden is almost abandoned and nature takes its rights...Michel Monet died in 1966 in a car accident. Without an heir, he bequeathed by will the property and the collections of Giverny at the Academy of fine arts.

    In the House where lived Claude Monet for 43 years, you can visit:on the ground floor: "small blue room" (reading room), groceries (warehouse), salon-workshop, the dining room (on the walls, the collection of Japanese prints), and the kitchen (with the blue tiles, Rouen, a huge stove and copper utensils);on the first floor: the apartments private with Monet room, the Alice 's bedroom and their toilets.
    In front of the House, the gardens recreated identically, consist of Clos Normand and water garden. Le Clos Normand has been shaped from the pictorial knowledge of Monet. When Monet moved to Giverny, it is conquered by the garden of one hectare constituted a apple orchard and a vegetable garden that runs along the House. A large driveway lined with Cypress and spruce leads to the arch door, and beds are lined with boxwood. He devoted years to the Clos Normand . It is remove the boxwood and the spruce and replaces them with metal poles. He plants the garden of thousands of flowers according to a rectilinear plan, including nasturtiums, roses, daffodils, tulips, daffodils, iris, poppies East and peonies.
    The work of Monet testifies to a passion for the play of light and reflections of clouds on the water. In 1893, he acquired a plot of land at the bottom of the Clos Normand, who became the 'water garden' passed to posterity, especially with water lilies, he created a monumental canvases in 1897. The water garden reflects the fascination of Monet for Japan. He built a Japanese bridge painted green and is planted with Orientals such as bamboo, Ginkgo biloba, maples, arbusives of the Japan peonies, lilies and weeping willows. Finally, Monet plant of water lilies at the bottom of the basin. The water garden was of the beginning the subject of constant and meticulous care, occupying a gardener full-time.

    The major part of the work of Claude Monet is preserved at the Musée Marmottan Monet (Paris 16éme). On the other hand the House of Monet hosts over 200 prints by ukiyo-e, dating from the 18th and 19th centuries including major works by Kitagawa Utamaro (1753-1806), Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849) Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858). Monet passion for Japanese art prints dates back to his years of artistic training in le Havre and is visible in some of the aesthetic choices made at Giverny, including at the water garden. Prints the most famous include one of the copies of the great wave of Kanagawa and the Mount Fuji of Hokusai.

    wonderful

    House of Claude Monet entrance the garden with view of the house of C Monet the clos normand at maison C Monet the archway to the Jardin d'Eau or water garden a view from the house window to garden
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    musée d'Evreux;museum of History and archeology

    by gwened Written Dec 23, 2013

    a museum of history and art next to the Cathedral. Open Tuesdays to Sundays from 10h- 12h and 14h- 18h free admission! Closed Jan 1, May 1, Nov 1 and 11, Dec 25

    Founded in 1873, the Museum of Évreux is installed since 1961 in the former Bishop's Palace, building built around 1600 on the grounds of the low Roman empire by Raoul de Fou (Bishop of Évreux from 1479 to 1511).

    The Evreux museum displays rich collections such as Archaeology, with several major pieces such as the famous bronze statues of Jupiter and Apollo, grow next to the Gallo-Roman ramparts (3C ).Housed in the former Bishop's Palace (late 15C), the Museum has a fine collection on the history of the bishopric (goldsmith and sculpture medieval and Renaissance) and presents its collection of decorative arts, furniture and paint (Flanders, Holland, Italy, France) at its 17C, 18C and 19C shows.Museum of Évreux remains also an important group of works from the second half of the 20C with works by major artists such as Simon Hantaï, Zao Wou - Ki, Pierre Soulages, Hans Hartung.

    Regularly, the Museum presents temporary exhibitions and participates in cultural events of national scope (Journées européennes du Patrimoine, night of museums, etc.). Throughout the year, a program of activities is developed in order to discover the richness of the collections ranging from the Palaeolithic to the 21C.

    Very nice indeed and nice building too

    entrance to Museum of Evreux
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    The Docks , le Havre

    by gwened Written May 26, 2013

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    This is a mix place, it can be shopping, nightlife, restaurants,or as I have determine put in The Things to Do, as many things can be done for the entire day and night here. It is a magical place good for the whole family and else. They used to be the old docks thereby the name, but now renovated kept and re use as a wonderful complete arts entertainment and shopping place.

    The bassin du Vatine and Vauban the wonderful complex of the Docks. Here you have a nice cinema Gaumont, restos, shops in an old dockyard building totally restore to house this complex. THe Dock Océane for expo, theater ,arts, the Les Bains de Docks for a water park, Docks Café, and Jardin Fluvial.

    The whole complex is great and easily spent. Here you have the Océane and Café expo places, http://www.dockslehavre.com/ ;
    Then you have the shopping and restos here, Docks Vauban, http://www.docksvauban.com/W/do/centre/accueil,
    The cinema Gaumont has its site here http://www.cinemasgaumontpathe.com/cinemas/cinema-gaumont-docks-vauban-le-havre/ ,
    The Les Bains de Docks is closed until september 2013 but should be good then ,have a pool indoors, site here http://www.vert-marine.com/les-bains-des-docks-le-havre-76/ ,
    The jardin fluvial is over 2 hectares or almost 5 acres of over 700 meters long ,all bordering the quais de la Saône ,and de la Marne. Here is more in French, http://lehavre.fr/dossier/le-jardin-fluvial-0

    just great easy as bus and tramway criss cross the place front and back; we took bus line 3 and it was good, plus hotels all around we were across street see tip.
    The GAumont cinema opens 7/7 from 11h to 01h
    Stores open 7/7 from 10h to 20h
    the Leclerc supermarket opens mondays to saturdays from 9h30 to 20h30 and Sundays from 9h to 13h
    Restaurants open 7/7 from service lunch to 23h
    You have welcome center, access for folks with impaired mobility, rest arounds wiht sofas, restrooms/baths, provides carriages for babies on rentals, parking for 1500 cars, taxi outsie available always.ATM cash distributors, free WiFI, photo store, I Pad place.10 entrance points from 0 by Docks Océane to Porte 9 by E Leclerc supermarket.

    Some of the stores favorites of ours are mango,zara,eram,H&M, Esprit,Quilsilver,Jules,Marionnaud, boulanger, la grandé recré,micromania,Gaumont cinema, Leclerc supermarket, Courtepaille resto, El Rancho resto, O Blé Gourmand, Pizza del Arte, Pomme de Pain,and Subway.

    Docks Vauban across bassin Gaumont cinema entrance inside Docks Vauban map of the whole complex for orientation Map of stores in Docks Vauban
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    Musée d'Arts Moderne André Malraux-Le Havre

    by gwened Written May 25, 2013

    We had no time to go in this time so photos to come, but it is a must in the city one of the best museum on modern art.

    This year is the event of Camille Pissaro 110 years after the visit b the painter. Overlooking the sea is already wonderful, inside is magical, really need to see it. And I again.

    You will see works by Pissaro, Boudin, Monet,Gauguin, Renoir, and Van Dongen, Marquet, Camoin, Dufy, and Friesz. You get the idea....

    admission now is 9€ adults and schedules are open Mondays to Fridays from 11h to 18h, Saturdays and Sundays from 11h to 19h

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    Marché aux poissons-Le Havre

    by gwened Updated May 25, 2013

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    well this is a thing to do and shopping, but some most come here and dont cook I amputting it here

    it is a historical place in town,known by all, and a must to come here when in the city.

    It is by the pont du docteur paul denis and in front of the famous Maison de l'Armateur,the fisherman come here with their fresh catch, and open up on the stalls already installed. The quality is the best and the prices unbeatable.

    Fruits, vegetables and regional products are also sold. Open 7/7 unless storm, from 14h30 to 19H for further info call the mayor's office at +33 02 35 19 45 45.

    march�� aux poissons
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    The beautiful Cathedral-Evreux

    by gwened Written Jun 13, 2012

    One of the best in Normandy for sure. A must to see

    born out of rivalty between the kings of France and the Dukes of Normandy that became kings of England. The Cathedral as a building was first mentioned in 912AD by Guillaume de Jumièges. It was rebuilt in the 11C ,burn by Henry I king of England in 1119AD, the church rebuilt again between 1125 and 1140AD (only remains the arcades of the nave) ,was burned again by king Philippe Auguste in 1194 in its fight with king Richard the Lion Hearted.

    Again burned in the war of 100 years in 1356AD ,it was again restore under king Louis XI a century after. In the 16C the facade was added on the north and portico, then a tower on the south was restored, finally in the 17C the north tower was finish.

    In 1940, the German air force partially destroyed it and on June 11 1940 it was in flames. The fire detroyed the fine organ from the 18C. Finally in August of 1983 a hurricane damage part of the glass enclosure in the choir.

    You must see it, this is the schedule of plays organ style

    http://orgues.evreux.free.fr/english/news/pages/page-presentation-news.htm

    cath��drale Notre Dame d'Evreux treasury in the crypt chapel mother of God the organ at the Cathedral
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  • Visit the Chateau de Beaumesnil

    by neocamino Written Apr 7, 2012

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    The Chateau de Beaumesnil makes for a great visit. The castle, the gardens and the interiors can be visited as well as a bookbinding museum. It is a Louis XIII style castle and is nicknamed the "Versailles Normand", that says it all !

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    Itineraires impressionnistes

    by aemilys Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    You've perhaps been to the museums or you took a course in art history...it's just not the same as seeing why they painted here.

    Several towns in Haute Normandy will help you to understand. The light is just so special in Le Havre or in Etretat...they made great paintings and I think that you will be inspired here as well. Light and shadow, you can't go wrong and your vacation photos will be just fab no matter what the weather.

    Wishing you a storm at sea!

    much wilder than Giverny
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    Take the Abbey Route

    by hquittner Written Jan 26, 2008

    Just down river on the Seine are several churches and ruins of powerful medieval monasteries. If you are traveling by car plan a day either from the from the city or en rote to or from it. The ruins are a delightful way to study the period architectures both Gothic and Romanesque. In St.-Martin a fine church is intact and as a dividend you will see the most picturesque part of the Seine as you drive. The other stops are the Abbeys of Jumieges and Saint-Wandrille.

    Jumieges Abbey St.-Martin-de-Boscherville Church
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    Visit Rouen

    by hquittner Written Jan 19, 2008

    Rouen is a flourishing port city (100+K pop) on the lower navigable reaches of the Seine. It is close enough to Paris to make it a carefully planned day trip, but there is so much to see and do in the city that it is really worth two days of sightseeing and at least one night or even two. It has a famous cathedral and a good Art Museum and interesting memories of Jeanne d'Arc. It is a good base from which to explore nearby sites in Normandy.

    Notre Dame Cathedral at Rouen
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Haute-Normandie Hotels

  • Hotel Cardinal

    about 50.00 US dollars or less...Under 300 french francs for one Magnificent and modern marble...

    more
  • La Musardiere

    123, rue Claude Monet, Giverny, 27620, France

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Solo

  • Hotel Dormy House Etretat

    Route du Havre, Etretat, Haute-Normandie, 76790, France

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Solo

    Hotel Class 3 out of 5 stars

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