Galleries & Passages, Paris

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  • Galleries & Passages
    by pfsmalo
  • Galleries & Passages
    by pfsmalo
  • Galleries & Passages
    by pfsmalo
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    Galerie Colbert 2nd.

    by pfsmalo Written Jun 22, 2011

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    First built in 1826 to build upon the success of the Galerie Vivienne practically next door. Unfortunately it never reached the same level of prosperity and went out of favour in 1830 to finally be virtually abandoned in 1860. Having been bought by the National Library, to which it backs onto, it has been renovated and re-opened to the public. The only shops are those of the Library and a restaurant. It does have a splendid piece of glasswork over the rotunda with a bronze statue of Eurydice beneath it. It can be entered from no 6 rue des Petits-Champs or rue Vivienne.

    Bourse is the closest metro

    The marble columned gallery. Glasswork of the rotunda. Painted motifs on the walls.

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    Passage du Caire, 75002.

    by pfsmalo Updated May 30, 2011

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    The passage du Caire is Paris' oldest covered passage and is also its longest. Measuring around 360 metres in total, having 4 branches and was constructed in 1798 after Napoleons campaign in Egypt. The most striking thing about the passage is the facade giving onto the place du Caire. Ornamented by 3 heads of the goddess Hathor surmounted further by some lovely bas-reliefs. Up above, over the 5th floor can be seen a caricature of Bouginier, a painter, done by collegues mocking his nasal appendice. The passage these days is pretty run down and is used in the main by wholesalers from the rag-trade.

    Nearest metro is Sentier.

    Facade on place du Caire. Close up on the heads of Hathor. Mister Bouginier....... Part of the gallery's elaborate glasswork.

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    Passage du Grand-Cerf. 2nd.

    by pfsmalo Updated Jun 14, 2010

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    The "Passage du Grand Cerf" is one of the prettiest in Paris. With its 3 floors and heighth of the glass roof at 11,80 metres it is the highest of Paris. It has 33 shops mainly dedicated to decoration and antiques, but does also have a brazilian restaurant. Built in 1835, this was the departure point for the postal wagons.

    Etienne Marcel is the nearest metro station.

    Passage du Grand Cerf

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    Les Passages

    by Flying.Scotsman Written Feb 16, 2010

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    These are a number of early 19th C shopping arcades, the best of which are in the Opera Quarter. The longest of these starts off Rue du Faubourg Montmartre just south of Rue Richer / Rue de Province. This is the Passage Verdeau which becomes the Passage Jouffroy and eventually the Passage des Panoramas. There are all manner of shops and small cafés. There are a number of other passages and galeries but the above is the best for exploring. If you want upmarket shopping and a taste of the passages, try the Galeries Colbert & Vivienne. If you are near the Pompidou Centre, there are a few passages off Rue Reaumur near the Arts et Metiers Metro Station. A visit to Paris is not complete for us without at least one walk through some of these arcades.

    A walk through les passages. And another.
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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    Passage du Bourg l'Abbé 2nd.

    by pfsmalo Updated Jan 30, 2010

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    Passage created in 1828 as a continuation between the passages "Grand-Cerf" and "de l'Ancre", lost some of its original length in 1858 when Blvd. Sebastopol was opened at one end and rue Palestro at the other. At the rue Palestro entrance there are still two "cariatides" that represent Industry and Commerce. These were sculpted by Aime Millet in 1863. Unfortunately the passage has suffered fire damage, and although renovated, pales in compararison to others, so much so that there is only one artisan left still operating in the passage.

    Closest metro is Etienne Marcel.

    Entrance with the two Cariatides. Passage and great clock.

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    Passage Vendome 3rd.

    by pfsmalo Written Dec 16, 2009

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    Built in 1827 to replace another passage called the "Jeu de Paume" in a local convent, this now runs between the Place de la Republique and the Rue Beranger and is a short-cut through to the Carreau du Temple, a well known covered market. The passage is slightly run down and in need of renovation and cleaning. Only open from Monday to Friday.

    Republique is the nearest metro.

    Facade and entrance from rue Beranger. From the rue Beranger end. Looking back up from the opposite side.

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    My favourite - Passage Moliere 3rd.

    by pfsmalo Updated Apr 18, 2009

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    I just love this passage, very short but so much character. Never very many people, gives one time to have a good look. Artists and theatre people are side by side here, even the cinema has its own boutique of posters. The theatre Moliere and the Maison de la Poesie have the same premises but when I was here last I'm not sure that it was still open, although there were posters attesting to the fact. Plus, their website does not respond. Pretty restaurant next door to the theatre but I didn't try it.

    Rambuteau metro is the closest.

    Passage Moliere 3rd. Maison de la Poesie/Theatre Moliere. Restaurant sign. The restaurant waiting for the client....... Still life.......Passage Moliere 75003 Paris.

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    Passage de la Trinité 2nd.

    by pfsmalo Updated Apr 16, 2009

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    The "Passage de la Trinité" was opened in 1827 and is parallel to "Passage du Basfour". Also built on the old Trinité hospital and its cemetary. There is not one shop or café in this thoroughfare so has nothing much to attract anyone and is left until the evening when late night revellers use it as an open air toilet.!!!!!

    Closest metro is Reaumur-Sebastopol.

    Passage de la Trinit�� 2nd.

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    Passage du Basfour 2nd.

    by pfsmalo Written Apr 15, 2009

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    In the middle ages this passage was first called "No chief Lane" and then "Bas-Fours Lane" and gave on to a plaster factory. Later the factory became the cemetary for the Trinity hospital. Today it is one of the cleaner and prettier open-air passages.

    Closest metro is Reaumur-Sebastopol.

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    Passage du Ponceau. 2nd.

    by pfsmalo Written Apr 15, 2009

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    The emplacement of the Passage du Ponceau was originally part of the Passage du Saumon. It was covered in 1825, renamed and re-opened in 1826. Ponceau meant "the small bridge that crosses the gutter. The open-air gutter in question was in rue St. Denis.
    Typical of some of the passages in the Sentier area, it is full of textile wholesalers.

    Closest to the Reaumur-Sebastopol metro.

    Entrance to Passage Ponceau.

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    Passage Sainte Foy 2nd.

    by pfsmalo Updated Apr 15, 2009

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    This passage is rather difficult to follow as it has two or three levels, also makes one feel apprehensif, as the district around here is not the best and it's not very well lit. History tells us it was rebuilt in 1813, doesn't seem to have been repainted since then.

    Closest metro is at St. Denis or Reaumur-Sebastopol.

    Murky Passage Sainte Foy.

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    Passage du Prado 10th

    by pfsmalo Updated Apr 15, 2009

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    This passage opened in 1785 and originally called "Passage du Bois de Boulogne" is on e of the rare Parisian passages to have a dog-leg in the passage. Covered in 1925 and re-baptised "Passage du Prado" in 1930 it is one of the most cosmopolitan of passages. A turkish pizzeria ??? and tea-shop mingles with an Indian barber and a Pakistani patisserie.

    Nearest metro is St. Denis.

    Superb Art-Deco ceilings!!!!

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    Passage de l'Industrie 10th.

    by pfsmalo Written Apr 15, 2009

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    The "Passage de l'Industrie" is only 108 metres long, full of wholesalers for hairdressers, but unfortunately has acquired the reputation as a local toilet. The sign on the left in the photo does say " Forbidden to urinate and to leave rubbish" but the right hand side of the photo shows what some people think of this......!!!

    Chateau d'Eau is the closest metro.

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    Passage du Marché 10th.

    by pfsmalo Written Apr 15, 2009

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    Also known as the "Passage du Marché St. Martin" this is a quiet calm passage and is just around the corner from "the smallest house in Paris" at 39 rue du Chateau d'Eau. Quiet street café for a café/croissant in the morning and a superbly coloured "Kosher" butchers shop.

    Chateau d'Eau is the nearest metro.

    Kosher butchers shop. Caf��, with the old market clock in rue Bouchardon.

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    Passage Brady, 10th.

    by pfsmalo Written Apr 15, 2009

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    Passage Brady is is one of a couple of covered passages in this area, although one half is uncovered. Constructed in 1828, it is now very well known for its Indian restaurants and grocers.

    Passage Brady is quite close to Chateau d'Eau and St. Denis metro stations.

    Passage Brady 10th.

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