Montmartre & Sacré Coeur, Paris

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  • Church St Pierre de Montmartre
    Church St Pierre de Montmartre
    by gwened
  • from parvis sacre coeur to Paris
    from parvis sacre coeur to Paris
    by gwened
  • Montmartre & Sacré Coeur
    by GentleSpirit
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    church of Saint Pierre, Montmartre

    by gwened Written Mar 1, 2015

    A wonderful old Church next to the more famous sacre cœur at 2 Rue du Mont Cenis, 75018 Paris;this is the Church of Saint Pierre or Peter.

    While writing about Saint Denis, the Passio Sancti Dionysii, written in 835AD, Hilduin of Saint-Denis called Montmartre the Mount of Martyrs and designates it as the decapitation of Saint Denis and his companions Saint Rustique and Saint Eleutherius. This allowed the hypothesis that their martyrdom took place near the Chapel, and that it was originally a mausoleum for the Evangelist du parisis and his acolytes. A pilgrimage developed.

    The Church of St Pierre starts building it in 1134AD and its finished by 1147AD Under the Pope Eugene III. During the French revolution it suffers grealty . In 1792, all buildings are confiscated, and the Abbey was evacuated on Sunday, August 19, 1792. The Abbey is desecrated and plundered. Declared national property, the buildings of the Abbey are sold at auction in several batches, and their purchasers were not delayed to tear them down. Even the crypt of the chapel of Saint-Martyr is annihilated, which leaves open the question of his real age and its function. The Church of Saint-Pierre escapes this fate, because it is the only Parish Church of Montmartre. Like most unsold churches, it is transformed into a Temple of reason after the banning of the cult under the terror. On 23 July 1794, the last Abbess, Louise de Laval, seventy-one years old, died under the guillotine. The cemetery surrounding the Church, opened in 1688, Calvary cemetery is vandalized. Above the choir, a tower designed to withstand the Chappe optical Telegraph was built from 1794, and stays in place until 1840. The choir itself serves as a dependent store of the Telegraph. The Church is reopened to the cult only belatedly, in 1803-1806, well after the Concordat ( the peace between state and Church)..

    The Church is accessible only by one of the three portals the west facade, which overlooks a small open courtyard on the rue du Mont-Cenis, almost in front of the place du Tertre.

    A bit of history of this wonderful Church.
    This is one of the two Catholic parish churches of the mound, and it represents the oldest parish church in Paris since the French Revolution after that of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. She succeeds a Merovingian Basilica dedicated to Saint Denis, whose five capitals and four marble columns were re-used in the current church, the columns from their tour of an ancient temple. Very dilapidated in the 12C, the old basilica was acquired by king Louis the fat in 1133, which is replaced by a new Romanesque church consecrated in 1147 by Pope Eugène III. Queen Adélaïde of Savoy at the same time founded an Abbey of Benedictine nuns in the South of the Church, known as the Abbey of Montmartre. The Church is therefore both a parish and monastery church . The construction of the nave ends only after the middle of the 12C, and the apse was rebuilt in primitive Gothic style at the end of the same century. The current vaults of the nave and the transept crossing are flamboyant and dates back to 1470, when the Church requires major repairs at the end of the hundred years war.

    In 1686, the nuns moved in a new monastery near the place des Abbesses, and the Church is since then to the exclusive use of the parish, but it remains the property of the Royal Abbey of Montmartre until the dissolution in 1792. Two years later, the apse of the Church has been disrupted by the construction of the Chappe tower above. As a result, the eastern parts of the Church are not rendered to the cult at its reopening in 1803. It is in a deplorable state, and 1838-1845 restoration campaigns and 1874 are too limited to prevent its ruin. The closure of the Church for safety reasons in 1896 appears to be final, and the decision of his rescue is made only at the last minute. The restoration is undertaken under the direction of Louis Sauvageot between 1900 and 1905, and the Saint-Pierre church then gets his current face.

    why not see it while visiting Sacre Cœur next door, it is very nice. More on the official guide of Montmartre in English here
    http://www.montmartre-guide.com/en/montmartre_stories/saint-pierre-church/

    Church St Pierre de Montmartre from parvis sacre coeur to Paris
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    the vinyards of Montmartre

    by gwened Written Oct 6, 2013

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    The vinyards have been here long, once it was a flourishing wine trade supplying Paris and beyond.
    Then they were left in disrepair and desease came in, almost wiping out the entire vinyards; The city took charge and a committee of loyal citizens of the Butte or hill took command. In 1935 , they began in the second weekend of October do a feast to celebrate the wines and vinyards of Montmartre, and the rest is history for the good of Paris and Montmartre;and the enjoyment of us all.

    The official link can be change to several languages with all the up to date information. We are just celebrating 80 years of vendages de montmartre!!October 9 to 13 2013. The program is full of activities for 3 days of fun in the heart of Montmartre.

    You have stands with local products of the city, a village of tastings events from all regions of France and the world. Entertainement, expositions, concerts, guided visits of the tourist places ,and the vinyards, and the sale of the juicy wine of the "Clos Montmartre" .
    Saturday morning, the traditional parade of the Ban des Vendanges in the vinyards itself and the party is starts in the afternoon. The grand procession takes place the Grand Défilé des confréries vineuses,all the fraternities of wines, musical and folkloric groups, etc.

    Saturday evenings is the fire works in front of marvelous Sacré-Coeur. And Sunday the ending ceremony and the dance of the singles not married folks lol!!!

    For info, it is the third most visited event in Paris after the popular Nuit Blanche and Paris Plage,

    passing by vinyards of Montmartre upclose of the grapes of the clos montmartre
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    Basilica of the Sacred Heart (Sacre Couer)

    by GentleSpirit Written Jun 22, 2013

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    The basilica stands on the highest point in Paris on the butte de Montmartre.

    I thought it was interesting that it was only started in 1875 (finished in 1914), dedicated to the excesses of one turbulent era while being finished in another era perhaps just as turbulent.

    It has a totally different look about it compared to other churches you will see in Paris. You don't have the Neo-Classical look of places like the Pantheon and the Madeleine. You also don't have the beautiful Gothic look of St Chapelle or Notre Dame. Just look at the three large domes that dominate the view of it, altogether different. Perhaps more similar to the eastern churches?

    When I was there last you got off the subway at Abesses and made your way up the stairs. There is a funicular that will take you up to the top but i took the stairs anyway, it didn't take very long. Though at the time there were some con-artists I have read that the area has plenty of them now, so be mindful of your belongings.

    The view from the balcony is wonderful. There are no photos allowed inside the Basilica though

    Dome of Sacre Couer
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    Monmartre

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Nov 18, 2012

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    Montmartre is a hill in the north of Paris.
    It is 130 metres high and gives its name to the surrounding district, in the 18th arrondissement, a part of the Right Bank. Montmartre is primarily known for the white-domed Basilica of the Sacré Cœur on its summit and as a nightclub district.
    The other, older, church on the hill is Saint Pierre de Montmartre, which claims to be the location at which the Jesuit order of priests was founded. Many artists had studios or worked around the community of Montmartre such as Salvador Dalí, Amedeo Modigliani, Claude Monet, Piet Mondrian, Pablo Picasso and Vincent van Gogh.
    Montmartre is also the setting for several hit films. This site is served by metro line 2 stations of Anvers, Pigalle and Blanche and the line 12 stations of Pigalle, Abbesses, Lamarck - Caulaincourt and Jules Joffrin.

    You can watch my 1 min 01 sec Video Paris Monmartre out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Monmartre
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    Roland Dorgeles 18th.

    by pfsmalo Updated May 19, 2012

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    On the small place situated on the opposite corner to the "Lapin Agile" in Montmartre, i.e. at the crossroads of rues des Saules and St. Vincent, you'll find apposed on the wall this plaque dedicated to the memory of Roland Dorgeles. Born Roland Lecavelé, he became a journalist and then a writer. After coming back from WW1 he wrote his most well known work "Les Croix de Bois"-"The wooden crosses", based on his war experiences, which narrowly missed the Prix Goncourt (a famous literary prize) in 1919. He entered the Goncourt Acadamy in 1929 and was president from 1954 until his death in 1973. His plaque is here looking down on the "Lapin Agile", his favourite haunt during many years.

    On the plaque is one of his citations "I hate the war but I love those that have been there".

    On one of the other corners are the famous Montmartre vineyards with the wall of the St. Vincent cemetery on the fourth corner, where is his last resting place.

    Lamarck-Caulaincourt is the closest metro.

    Roland Dorgeles The cabaret An unknown painting the The famous Montmartre vineyards. The Dorgeles tomb in St Vincent cemetery.

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    Porcelain factory of Clignancourt. 18th.

    by pfsmalo Written May 15, 2012

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    Started around 1760 by a Mr. Pierre Deruelle who bought the land from his mother in law in then Clignancourt and started up a porcelain factory. Competing directly with the Sevres factory, it became difficult when Clignancourt was not allowed to use gold as per Sevres, fo rdecoration. Finally in 1787 the factory was allowed the gold and had an upsurge in demand, necessitating up to over 90 workers. Unfortunately after the Revolution, having lost most of the rich clientele to flight or the guillotine, the factory had a downturn and finally closed in1800. Another attempt was made a few years later but didn't last long. The majority of the buildings were demolished in the early 1900's except for this corner tower and part of the adjacent building, which has now been saved as a historic monument since 1965.

    Situated at 63 rue Mont de Cenis, 75018 Paris.

    Nearest metro is Jules Joffrin

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    A tour of Place du Tertre and surrounds...

    by timtrina Updated Apr 4, 2011

    After our ceremonies we were given a private tour of the Sacre Couer, Place du Tertre, and private places by Mayor Yatt. It was such a lovely and memorable morning.

    If anyone is interested in doing either the Wedding or Baptsim, click on the link below, and all details about the ceremonies are listed.

    A private tour of Montmartre with the Mayor...

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    Amelie's World - Au Marche de la Butte

    by clairegeordio Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is another 'landmark' from the film 'Amelie'. It is M Collignon's grocery store, where Amelie bought her fruit and veg from. The film renamed the building 'Maison Collignon, and this still remains above the shop.
    The owner has now created his own website below, tracing the steps of Amelie's adventures

    Address: 56 rue des Trois Freres, 75018 Paris
    Closed Mondays.

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    Rocher de la Sorciere (Witches rock) 18th.

    by pfsmalo Updated Aug 14, 2010

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    Lying between 65 rue Lepic and 23 avenue Junot is an un-named alleyway that is part of what was known as the "maquis" of Montmartre, wild and unlawful. Here at the top of the staircase sits a rock known locally as "Witches Rock" or Rocher de la Sorciere. UPDATE - 14/08/2010 : Unfortunately it is no longer possible to take this passage due to subsidence under the steps that lead down and present a real danger

    Anecdote : The Henri-Georges Clouzot film "L'Assassin habite au numero 21" "The murderer lives at no. 21", supposedly 21, Avenue Junot. But there has never been a no. 21, the numbers jump from 15 to 23.

    Whilst here, at the corner of no. 25 Avenue Junot is the exquisite "Villa Leandre", another mouth-watering cul-de-sac that in the middle of a city shouldn't be there.

    Look closely on the pavement around nos. 43/47 av. Junot and try and spot the brass plates marked "Arago" that mark the passage of the Paris meridien.

    Lamarck-Caulaincourt is the closest metro.

    The Rocher de la Sorciere at the top. Villa Leandre 75018 Paris.

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    Rue de l'Abreuvoir. 18th.

    by pfsmalo Written Apr 26, 2009

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    Two very unusual houses in this street, the first at no. 2 being the more well known, as Maurice Utrillo painted it around 1912, known as "La Maison Rose". Still a bar/restaurant and being in one of the most touristy areas of Paris is expensive. Menus start at 35 euros.

    Just down the road is a far more interesting house at no. 4 that was lived in by Commandant Henri Lachouque, historian of Napoleon and the Great Army. At the front gate are two examples of the "Imperial Eagle" and on the right hand side is a sundial with the inscription "Quand tu sonneras, je chanterais"" When you ring I will sing". Just below this there is a plaque giving details of the Commandant.

    Nearest metro is Lamarck-Caulaincourt.

    Rue de l'Abreuvoir taken from the place Dalida. La Maison Rose. The Commandants house at no. 4. The ornamental sundial.

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    Moulin de la Galette. 18th.

    by pfsmalo Written Apr 26, 2009

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    These are the only two windmills left on Montmartre out of the 30 that were here originally. Collectively, the two are known as Moulin de la Galette from the cabarets name. The oldest one of Montmartre, is the Moulin Blute-Fin, between nos. 75 and 77 rue Lepic, built in 1622, still has its mechanism inside. Unfortunately cannot be visited. The one that is still open as a restaurant was built in 1717 and called the Moulin Radet is at 83 rue Lepic, but was moved here in 1924 from a little way down the hill. All is classed "Historic Monument" since 1958.

    Metro Lamarck-Caulaincourt is probably a little bit closer than Abbesses.

    The telephone and site address below are given if you fancy a special night out........

    Moulin Blute-Fin, 75 rue Lepic 75018 Paris. Moulin Radet, 83 rue Lepic 75018 Paris. Delightful passage just behind the windmill.

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    Amélie

    by polardabar Updated Jan 25, 2009

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    Le tabac des deux moulins is the little bar where the very well-known Amélie was filmed! It looks so nice & cozy & everything's almost the same as in the movie. If you've seen the film, you'll recognize all inside but the cigarette kiosk - it doesn't exist. And if you remember the toilet [and what happened inside] be sure to click to see the other photo... ;)

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    Get lost in Montmartre

    by maestrousmc Written Mar 9, 2008

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    I took Robert Frost's suggestion to "take the road less travelled" literally when I decided to take every side street possible on the way to the Sacre Coeur. No funicular. No tourists en route. Should you choose to do the same, you'll be amazed when you find amazing boulangeries, patisseries, and cafes throughout what has come to be one of may favorite areas: Montmartre.

    Don't be afraid of getting lost. If you keep walking uphill, you'll eventually find the basilica. If you get tired, who cares? It's reason enough to take a break for a cafe creme.

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    Espace Dalí Montmartre

    by BeatChick Updated Dec 29, 2007

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    During my trek in Montmartre in 2003 I visited this museum devoted to the grand Spanish Surrealist painter, Salvador Dalí. Unfortunately, it was closed when I showed up, but at least I know where it is now! To find it, pass through Place du Tertre to the south, then pass through the Place du Calvaire and it's right around the corner to the west.

    Address:
    11, rue Poulbot, Paris 75018

    Photos: November 2007, August 2005

    Espace Dal�� Montmartre Salvador Dal��
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    The Most Famous Vineyard in Paris

    by BeatChick Updated Nov 26, 2007

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    Vigne du Clos Montmartre

    Located on Montmartre at the corner of rue St-Vincent & rue des Saules, this is the most famous vineyard in Paris, one that produces 300 bottles (production 2002: 805 bottles) of wine feted by a wine festival every October. Unfortunately, this is closed to the public throughout the rest of the year. The vineyard opened in 1932.

    Opposite is Au Lapin Agile and catty-corner to it is Cimetiere St-Vincent where the Montmartois artist, Maurice Utrillo is buried.

    Here is more information about other vineyards in Paris.

    Metro: Lamarck-Caulaincourt
    Contact info:
    Association loi 1901
    Comite Officiel des Fetes et d'Action Sociale de Montmartre et du 18eme Arrondissement
    (Mairie du XVIIIeme Arrondissement)
    1, place Jules Joffrin - 75877 PARIS CEDEX 18
    E-mail:
    fetedesvendanges.montmartre@laposte.net

    The website (in French) provides all the info for the next f?te including activities provided.

    Photos: November 2007

    Clos du Montmartre Vineyard in Montmartre Montmartre Vineyard
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