Montmartre & Sacré Coeur, Paris

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  • Montmartre & Sacré Coeur
    by GentleSpirit
  • Dome of Sacre Couer
    Dome of Sacre Couer
    by GentleSpirit
  • Rue de l'Abreuvoir taken from the place Dalida.
    Rue de l'Abreuvoir taken from the place...
    by pfsmalo
  • Rue Caulaincourt

    by alkgirly Written Feb 21, 2007

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you find yourself in the Monmartre one evening and you don't fancy mingling with the tourists and artists, then take a stroll down the Rue Caulaincourt where the locals hang out after-hours. There are some really nice bars and restaurants down this way that often get missed as it's outside the 'tourism zone'. After you've done whiling the evening away, get lost in the streets and admire the architecture and townhouses/apartments on your way back to the main drag.

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    Moulin de la Galette - Montmartre

    by BeatChick Updated Nov 19, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Moulin de la Galette (or Windmill of the Biscuit) is one of two windmills left in Montmartre. Back in the day they used to have outdoor dances such as that made famous by Renoir's "Bal du Moulin de la Galette" (or "Dancing at the Moulin de la Galette, Montmartre" per the Musée d'Orsay's English Visitor's Guide) and Van Gogh's Le Moulin de la Galette.

    If you didn't know this windmill was here you'd probably miss it (hidden among the foliage) while trudging uphill on rue Lepic.

    Directions: Corner of rue Lepic and rue Tholozé in Montmartre at #77, just up the hill on rue Lepic from where Vincent Van Gogh lived with his brother, Theo (54 r. Lepic).

    Every day except Monday rue Lepic beomes a street market (a little slice of local Montmartois life) - best to come on the weekends.

    Photos: April 2003

    Moulin de la Galette - Montmartre - r. Lepic Moulin de la Galette - Montmartre - r. Lepic Moulin de la Galette - Montmartre - r. Lepic
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  • Lady_Mystique's Profile Photo

    "I LOVE YOU" WALL

    by Lady_Mystique Updated Aug 26, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    While you are roaming the area of Montmartre, or coming down the hill from visiting the 'Sacre Coeur', then be sure to look for this special wall covered with

    "I LOVE YOU" in languages from all over the world.

    Is this not one of MILLES reasons why Paris is such a romantic city???

    I THINK SO!!! :o)

    xxx ooo xxx ooo xxx ooo xxx ooo xxx

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Montmartre

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 8, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Montmartre away to the north of the city centre on the tallest hill in the city, is the most unabashedly romantic district of Paris. Montmartre is the last village in the big city of Paris. It still keeps a very subtle and unique atmosphere in spite of the affluence of tourists from all over the world. The many painters of Place du Tertre are always ready to sketch out your face. They remind us of the many pennyless artists who lived there a Bohemian life in the early 20th century.

    Over the course of the hill, there are gardens, steep streets and lovely old houses. The area can very very popular and very crowded during the weekends. Try and visit on weekends.

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Sacre Coeur

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 8, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sacre Coeur is a landmark in Montmatre and it enjoys fabulous panoramic views in all directions. The plans to build a church to the Sacred Heart on the hill at Montmartre asked for a style of Romano-Byzantine. The first step in this plan was to lay the first stone in 1875. It took until 1914 to complete the building but it was then not concencrated until 1919 after the first world war had ended. Inside the church you will find one of the worlds largest mosaics which depicts Christ with arms outstretched.

    Location: 35 rue du Chevalier de la Barre

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Last Vineyard in Paris

    by barryg23 Updated Jun 5, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Atmospheric, and very photogenic, the only remaining vineyard in Paris is one of the hidden delights of the city. Few know about it but once it's been discovered, it will always draw you back.

    Its 2000 vines lie on a gentle slope behind the Museum of Montmartre, near the Lapin Agile nightclub. This area has to be one of the most beautiful in Paris. The opening shots of the movie Amelie were filmed on the street right beside this vineyard and the area is full of picture postcard images of Paris. Winding streets, steep staircases, prettty houses....don't miss it.

    Vineyard in Montmartre

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  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    Montmartre Museum

    by rexvaughan Updated May 23, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This small museum is in a house that was home to Renoir when he did his famous 'Bal du Moulin de la Galette' painting. The house was also occupied at various times by Maurice Utrillo, his mother and other artists., but that is probably true of many places in Montmartre. The museum, while not overly impressive, is a very interesting collection of photos, paintings, posters and memorabilia relating to the history and heyday of Montmartre. There are some original works as well. All in all, it is well worth a visit. I am glad our friend Pam introduced us to it. (Note: in the photo my wife has a cast from Grindelwald, Switzerland but that is another story.) Entry is about 5 euro. Closed Mondays.

    Pam & Sacra at Montmartre Museum
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    Tu me fais tourner la tête...

    by themagiclake Written Mar 19, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mon manège à moi, c'est toi
    Je suis toujours à la fête
    Quand tu me tiens dans tes bras
    Je ferais le tour du monde
    Ça ne tournerait pas plus que ça
    La terre n'est pas assez ronde
    Pour m'étourdir autant que toi...
    Ah! Ce qu'on est bien tous les deux
    Quand on est ensemble nous deux
    Quelle vie on a tous les deux
    Quand on s'aime comme nous deux
    On pourrait changer de planète
    Tant que j'ai mon cour près du tien
    J'entends les flons-flons de la fête
    Et la terre n'y est pour rien
    Ah oui! Parlons-en de la terre
    Pour qui elle se prend la terre?
    Ma parole, y a qu'elle sur terre!!
    Y a qu'elle pour faire tant de mystères!
    Mais pour nous y a pas d'problèmes
    Car c'est pour la vie qu'on s'aime
    Et si y avait pas de vie, même,
    Nous on s'aimerait quand même
    Car...
    Tu me fais tourner la tête
    Mon manège à moi, c'est toi
    Je suis toujours à la fête
    Quand tu me tiens dans tes bras
    Je ferais le tour du monde
    Ça ne tournerait pas plus que ça
    La terre n'est pas assez ronde...
    Mon manège à moi, c'est toi!...

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  • BeatChick's Profile Photo

    Where Van Gogh Learned to Incorporate Color

    by BeatChick Updated Mar 16, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I have a terrible need of - dare I say the word? -religion. Then I go out at night to paint the stars...
    - Vincent van Gogh, Arles, 1888

    Before Van Gogh moved to Arles to paint the stars he lived here at 54 rue Lepic in Montmartre with his beloved brother, Theo.

    It is said that Vincent learned to incorporate bold color in his expressive paintings after his move to Paris. Certainly he moved from a more sombre tone in his works to one filled with color & vibrancy after he lived and worked in Montmartre among fellow artists (Gauguin was a great friend of his before they parted company). Could it have been, too, that he was just happy because he lived in Paris?? :)

    Photos: April 2003

    Vincent Van Gogh's home in Paris - 54 r. Lepic Vincent Van Gogh's home
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  • BeatChick's Profile Photo

    Embarkation Point of the Headless St.-Denis

    by BeatChick Updated Mar 16, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chapelle du Martyre

    Well, I HAD to see the spot where supposedly St. Denis was beheaded (martyred by the Romans). According to legend, he then picked up his head, stopped to wash it off at a fountain (Impasse Girardon off rue Girardon) & proceeded north walking about 4 miles before finally succumbing to death, exhaustion, or gravity. Where he fell down is the site of the modern-day Basilique St-Denis just outside of Paris proper.

    Of course, if you mark his course on a map you'll notice he didn't exactly go in a straight line!

    Directions:
    From Metro Abbesses, go east on rue des Abbesses. Rue Yvonne-le-Tac branches off from this street. Continue east 'til just past rue des Martyrs.

    Photos: April 2003

    Chapelle du Martyre Chapelle du Martyre Chapelle du Martyre - Hours of Operation Chapelle du Martyre sign
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    Rue du Calvaire in Montmartre

    by Diana75 Updated Feb 24, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A real nightmare going home everyday, isn't it?

    They couldn't find another name more appropriate for this street than "Rue du Calvaire".

    At least the locals don't need to go to gym anymore...

    Just wandering in Montmartre was a real delight because we had the chance to discover funny / interesting places like this one.

    Rue du Calvaire Rue du Calvaire Rue du Calvaire
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    Tristan Tzara's house in Montmartre

    by Diana75 Updated Feb 24, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As I mentioned before, we didn't plan anything when we've visited Montmartre, that's why our pleasure to discover different places, monuments, historic buildings was bigger.

    Wandering in Montmartre we found on a street Tristan Tzara's house made by the architect Adolf Loos.

    Tristan Tzara���s house in Montmartre Tristan Tzara���s house in Montmartre Tristan Tzara���s house in Montmartre
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    Place Dalida in Montmartre

    by Diana75 Written Feb 18, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In 1997, the angle of the rues Girardon and Abreuvoir in the Butte Montmartre in Paris was inaugurated as "Place Dalida" in memory of this great singer.

    In a corner a life-size bust of Dalida was erected.

    Place Dalida in Montmartre Place Dalida in Montmartre
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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    A windmill on Rue Lepic

    by sourbugger Updated Nov 22, 2005

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    Montmatre used to be the home of over 40 windmills, and although the area survived the bulldozing of Haussmann during the second republic, only three windmill remain. None of them work and two are reconstructions anyway.

    The prettiest is probably Moulin Radet on Rue Lepic. Rue Lepic is in fact well worth a walk as it twists pleasingly between the top of Montmatre and the Clichy Boulevard.
    For many years reduced to just 2 sails only, but recently the 4 sails have been reinstated. The stands over a restaurant which goes by the name of "Moulin de la Galette".

    It takes a good picture.

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    Dome of Sacre Coeur

    by Jase1177 Updated Oct 11, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Although many (I included) would not consider Sacre Coeur as off the beaten path, there is one part of that many tend to over look. The dome of Sacre Coeur is open to the public for stunning views of Paris. This is the second highest vantage point in Paris; the Eiffel Tower is obviously the first.

    To get to the dome entrance, you have to go to the left side of the building (when facing the main steps). There is a small directional sign pointing you in the direction. Once get on that side, go down the steps to what appears to be the sublevel. There is a small entrance way with an automatic ticket machine. For €5 (cash or French credit only), you are dispensed a ticket to insert in the automatic turnstile to gain access.

    After entering, you begin to climb many steps, sometimes steep with a tight spiral. At a couple points, you have to walk a path across part of the roof. Once you reach the top (actually the base of the dome), you will have a 360° view of the city. On a clear day, the views are spectacular and breath-taking. There are several high-powered pay telescopes around the viewing deck. Although the deck space is a little narrow, there are stone benches. The view deck is rather grimy and littered with graffiti, but that should not detract from purpose: the views. I climbed the dome on my birthday and sat there gazing out at the city of Paris; what a way to spend a birthday!!

    I would highly recommend taking the effort and cost to walk up to the top of the dome, especially since you will most likely already be planning to visit Sacre Coeur.

    View from Sacre Coeur Dome View from Sacre Coeur Dome Sacre Coeur Bell Tower Sacre Coeur View from Sacre Coeur Dome
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