Walking Around, Paris

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  • Strange!!!!
    Strange!!!!
    by pfsmalo
  • Walking Around
    by pfsmalo
  • Renovated workshop.
    Renovated workshop.
    by pfsmalo
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    Villa du Bel-Air, 12th.

    by pfsmalo Written Nov 22, 2014

    Out in the far-flung wastes of the 12th arrondissement is the Villa du Bel-Air, whose only real interest lies in the fact that the old abandoned Petite Centure railway runs alongside and where you can still see a platform of the old Bel-Air station. But abandoned!!! I thought so until I saw this strange machine going up and down the rails, obviously involved in some work or other along the line. (See photo 3).

    Closest metro is Picpus.

    Track showing the platform. The old throughway to the station. Strange!!!!

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    Chapel of the Blessed Virgin

    by gwened Written Nov 19, 2014

    This is a wonderful historical place and indeed many times overpassed. At the door there is a statue of the Virgin and Child that greets you with the inscription "Monstra te esse matrem" OR show yourself Mother. Metro Sévres-Babylone or Saint-Placide, both are not far from the chapel. Also available are city buses: 39, 63, 70 84, 87, 94, which bring you nearer. You are here, at 140 rue du Bac, in the 7th arrondissement or district.

    It holds the House of the daughters of the Charity and it is a place of high pilgrimage as it is here that the Holy Virgin show up to Sainte Catherine Labouré. The building is the former hôtel de Chatillon,and the order opens on August 6 , 1815 ; first dedicated to the Holy Heart of Jesus. It was enlarged in 1849,and after several changes until 1930, the date of the apparition. After a complete renovation was done as the one you see today.

    The doctrine of the immaculate conception was not officially done at the time of Sainte Catherine, but the medals with the insignia of « done without sins » influence the Pope Pie IX ; that proclaims on December 8 1854, the dogma of the Immaculate Conception.

    Catherine died 46 years after the apparitions without ever revealing its secrets to others than God and Holy Virgin. Buried in 1933 , her body is now perfectly preserve in a chasse in the chapel of the miracously medal. The body of Sainte Louise de Marillac ,also rests here not far from that of Catherine Labouré.

    This is the official site of the miracle medal in French
    http://www.medaille-miraculeuse.fr/chapelle-medaille-miraculeuse

    Chapelle Notre Dame de la Medaille Miraculeuse the Holy Virgin Saint Catherine Labourd�� the nave of Chapel mosaique conception and virgin chasse
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    Place Victor Hugo

    by gwened Written Nov 17, 2014

    this is a typical square in Paris sublime nice and I past by it many times !! It is also, cross by Avenue Victor Hugo. It was name as such from 1885,after the death of Victor Hugo,as also was the avenue. Before the square was call rond-point de Saint-Cloud, rond-point des Bassins,rond-point de la Plaine , and the place de l'Hippodrome. After the annexation of Passy to Paris (1860),it was called the place d'Eylau.

    At the center of the square it had a statue to Victor Hugo done in 1902 . It was done n copper on a stone base. The part done in bronze was melted from weapons from the occupation of 1943. The decoration and bottom of the statue are kept today in the musée des beaux-arts of Calais and on Veules-les-Roses. In 1964,a huge fountain was done in its place.

    In the square you have the Church Saint-Honoré-d’Eylau and it house the monks of Bethléem. as well as the house where Maurice Schumann was born; a hero of the French resistance and Radio free France announcer
    http://www.ordredelaliberation.fr/fr_compagnon/911.html

    the Streets that come out of this wonderful square are avenue Raymond-Poincaré, rue Léonard-de-Vinci, avenue Victor-Hugo, rue Copernic, rue Boissière, rue Mesnil, avenue Bugeaud, and rue de Sontay

    place Victor Hugo and fountain
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    13 rue de Sevigné, 4th.

    by pfsmalo Written Oct 20, 2014

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    The first thing that strikes you about this building is the main doors that are open during the week. They have been here so long, I'm told since the 14th c, that they have been classed Monument Historique. But what does the "D" stand for, perhaps the owners name, no-one has trace of it. Inside the porchway is a lovely old artisans workshop, renovated and in part, now an apartment.
    There is also the burial stone of Mere Marie du St Esprit, la mere de Mme de Sevigné. The count of Chavigny, Leon Bouthillier, the foreign minister of Louis XIII, lived here for a time. and had his own mansion built almost next door at nos 7-9.

    St Paul is the closest metro.

    Porch into the courtyard. Carved design on the monumental doors. Renovated workshop. The concierges work.

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    10 rue des Rosiers, 4th.

    by pfsmalo Written Oct 20, 2014

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    The garden that was started in the Hotel de Coulanges/Maison de l'Europe is now finished and enlarged to over 2000 sq.metres. It also now has the passage right through to the rue des Rosiers. Another of the towers of the Philippe Auguste wall has been re-discovered and renovated. The tower was buried under trees and bushes and only the fact of chopping these down to enlarge the pathways and garden permitted the discovery, that everyone at the the City Hall had forgotten about. When I was there in Sept. 2014 they were still working on it but it should be finished soon.

    St Paul is the nearest metro.

    Inside of the tower. Chimney of the

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    St Merri church, 4th.

    by pfsmalo Written Oct 19, 2014

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    Constructed between 1500 and 1550 St Merri is known as the church that has never closed its doors to any one. Even during the recent renovation work on the façade it remained open to anyone. On the corner of rue St Martin and rue de la Verrerie it has stood in what was the centre of Paris' red-light district and gave shelter to many a working-girl that had nowhere to go or had been thrown out by her pimp for not earning enough.
    The façade has finally been renovated due to the danger from falling stones and the City Hall had to do something. But the church is run down and really needs its roof doing before touching the inside.
    It also has the distinction of having Paris' oldest bell dating from 1331 and saved from a previous chapel that stood here. Many of the paintings were destroyed during the Revolution, but no-one touched the bell.
    When I was here last the main entrance on rue St Martin was closed as the renovation work was not quite finished so you have to go down the side to 76 rue de la Verrerie.

    Hotel de Ville is the closest metro.

    Main entrance arch showing renovation. One of the stained glass windows. The organ from 1650.

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    Julien Aurouze, 8 rue des Halles,1er.

    by pfsmalo Written Oct 18, 2014

    Not for the squeamish, the shopfront of Julien Aurouze.Full of dead stuffed rats and other unwholesome pests. The shop has been here since 1872, now being run by the original owners great-grandchildren, coinciding with the need for pest control in Les Halles market just yards away, along with the dozens of restaurants in the area. Although the market has now moved to Rungis near Orly airport, the shop is still doing a roaring trade as new foundations are dug up practically every day, so plenty of the beasties are still coming to the surface and need to be brought under control. Worth a look even if you don't need their services.

    Chatelet is the closest metro.

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    Cour Vendome, 1st.

    by pfsmalo Written Oct 15, 2014

    Tucked away in the S-W corner of place Vendome is the Cour Vendome, a luxury passage notable for its lack of windows with something in. Being part of the Hotel Lebas de Montargis it held the HQ of the Club de l'Entresol, a private club in the early 1700's before being banned by the clergy.
    At the rue St Honoré end Mme Geoffrin a rich bourgeoise held a famous literary club until she died in 1777, visited by Marivaux and foreign celebrities like the Polish Prince Poniatowski.

    Tuileries is the nearest metro.

    From place Vendome.

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    Edicule Guimard, pl Ste. Opportune, 1st.

    by pfsmalo Written Oct 15, 2014

    This is the third of the "Edicule Guimard" of the Art-Nouveau type still standing after Porte Dauphine and Abbesses. Whilst the others are originals, the Abbesses one being deplaced from Hotel de Ville, this one was reconstructed identically to the original by the RATP in 2000. Built with a "v" shaped glass roof and open sides and three posts to hold the roof it resembles the one at Abbesses.

    Obviously Chatelet is the closest metro (if you come out the right exit.)

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    Village St. Honoré, 1st.

    by pfsmalo Written Oct 15, 2014

    Very small dead-ended passage that originally went right through to the rue de Rivoli with nothing much of interest here apart from the luxury shops, boutiques and art galleries, although there is this ugly fountain that is pretty dated.
    Entrance is at 91 rue St Honoré.

    Louvre-Rivoli is the nearest metro

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    Place des Petits-Peres, 2nd.

    by pfsmalo Written Oct 14, 2014

    After coming through the seemingly artificial light of the Galerie Vivienne we come out onto this lovely quiet little place. On one side Notre Dame des Victoires, started by Louis XIII in 1629, not finished but inaugurated in 1666 and finally terminated in 1740. Opposite at no 8 but originally at no 6 where a statue of Mary is still in a niche, is the Maison Bleue where you can buy all religious articles. On the 3rd side there is an ordinary looking building but of sinister memory. It is the building from which the Police for the Jewish question held their own inquisition for the Anti-Jewish Vichy regime of France during WW II.
    On the corner of the place is the tiny street "rue Vide-Gousset", which literally means "Empty-Pockets", the theory for the name being that there had been lots of muggings and robberies going on here. Next it is "rue du Mail", Mail being a form of croquet played in the 17th c and probably played here. Franz Liszt lived at no 13 on and off during 50-odd years.

    Bourse and Sentier are the closest metros.

    Notre-Dame des Victoires. Police HQ, with plaque to the right of the door. Watch your pockets!!!!!!

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    398 rue St Honoré, 1st.

    by pfsmalo Written Oct 11, 2014

    Owned by a certain Maurice Duplay, this house was the residence of Maximilien Robespierre, one of the great movers of the French Revolution, but also the instigator of the "Terreur". A noted speaker Robespierre was friends with Danton and Desmoulins, both of whom lost their heads despite his "friendship". After the fall of the King he made his way up to become one of the leading members of the new Parliament. After his entry into the "Comité du Salut Public" or the Revolutionary Committee he became known as the "Incorrupible". After becoming President of the Committee and embracing the "Cult of the Supreme Being" he also finished on the guillotine in July 1794 when the people and Committee had had enough of his dictatorial tendencies.

    Concorde is the closest metro.

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    Place de la Nation + Cours de Vincennes, 11th,12th

    by pfsmalo Written Oct 8, 2014

    Place de la Nation is a major hub of Eastern Paris and is the meeting point of the 11th and 12th arrondissements, while the Cours de Vincennes runs in a straight line from the Chateau de Vincennes to Nation (with a change of name). Originally named "Place du Trone" as it is the spot where Louis XIV and his new bride, Marie-Therese entered Paris in 1660. The exact spot where the thrones were placed is not known. Re-named "Place du Trone renversé" in 1792 after the fall of Louis XVI and then "Place de la Nation" in 1880. The bronze block of statues was erected in 1879, just before. A major fair known as the "Foire du Trone" was held here and along the Cours de Vincennes until 1965 when it was moved because of increasing traffic. The statues that stand just by the emplacements of the ancient Tax offices that were part of the old wall of the "Fermiers Generaux", were erected in 1787 by Claude Ledoux, although the statues of Philippe Auguste and St Louis were not placed until 1845. Just by the building on the south side was the guillotine used in 1794, were over 1300 people were beheaded. Also beheaded here were the 16 Carmelite sisters from Compiegne who refused to renounce their faith. The Cours de Vincennes is one of the widest arteries in Paris and offers a view of the Eiffel Tower between the two Ledoux columns that is probably the furthest that you can get away from the tower itself in Paris and still see it. The Cours lies between the 12th and 20th arrondissements and has always been a working-class district that shows this in the ceramist's work on his façade although the firm has now closed. If the gate is open, more tiles and ceramics are on view inside. Between the place and the ceramist is the store of "Printemps Nation". Looking up above the ground floor one can see along the length of the building art-deco window paintings. I have yet to find out who by and when these were painted.

    Eiffel tower between the Ledoux columns. St. Louis (Louis IX) and the northern tax office. La Triomphe de la Republique. Ancient ceramist's workshop. Art-deco window at Printemps Nation.

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    Place de la République

    by gwened Written Sep 11, 2014

    One of the emblematic squares of Paris, noted for its nightlife and manifestations or strikes. It has recently gone thru a great renovation of the area so its time to do a tip about it. I come here often ::) business and pleasure.

    In brief, the place de la République has 3,4 hectares located in the borders of the 3e, 10e and 11e arrondissements de Paris. It was called before the place du Château-d'Eau until 1879. It has 7 Streets radiating from it with five metro lines giving a great crossroads spot in Paris.

    If you follow clockwork, the Streets coming to it are boulevard de Magenta, rue Beaurepaire, rue Léon-Jouhaux, rue du Faubourg-du-Temple, avenue de la République, boulevard Voltaire, boulevard du Temple, rue du Temple, boulevard Saint-Martin, and rue René-Boulanger.

    The monument in the center done in 1883 is a hommage to the French Republic closer to the Streets rue du Temple (southwest) ,and rue du Faubourg-du-Temple (northeast). The statue is 9,5 meters high and on the top is a bouquet of olives symbolising peace. The pedestal has three stone statues, allegories of freedom, equality and brotherhood. Under these statues, all around the pedestal, a set of twelve high reliefs in bronze represent significant dates of the French Republic. A statue of bronze lion, symbolizing the Universal Suffrage, is placed at the foot of the statue, in some steps down. At the level of the ground, the monument is surrounded by a cylindrical basin, about 1 m wide, added in 2013.

    The symbols with dates of mention are
    20 June 1789: oath of the Jeu de paume
    July 14, 1789: storming of the Bastille
    4 August 1789: night of August 4, 1789
    July 14, 1790: Fête de la Fédération
    11 July 1792: Proclamation of "the fatherland in danger".
    20 September 1792: Battle of Valmy
    September 21, 1792: Proclamation of the abolition of the monarchy
    13 prairial year II (June 1, 1794): Battle of 13 prairial year II
    29 July 1830: three glorious
    March 4, 1848: Decree of abolition of slavery
    4 September 1870: Proclamation of the Republic
    14 July 1880: first national holiday

    A wonderful magical place day or night. The city of Paris has a lot more in French on it. and a bit less in English at the tourist office
    http://en.parisinfo.com/transport/90901/Place-de-la-République

    Place de la R��publique and its monument
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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    Outdoor Market Places

    by GracesTrips Updated Aug 28, 2014

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    I loved stumbling onto these street vending market places. They pop up here and there - we discovered them as we walked around town. The food that is available was more impressive than any gourmet market I have ever been in. Roasted chickens & potatoes, the unlimited amounts of various cheeses, the enormous variety of seafood available, etc. Of course, as a tourist, you just can't buy groceries and prepare your meal in your hotel room. We did buy olives to snack on - just wonderful! Photo is a little crooked but you should be able to make it out.

    Olive selection
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