Walking Around, Paris

148 Reviews

Know about this? Rate It!

hide
  • And, without.
    And, without.
    by pfsmalo
  • With the engraved flowers.
    With the engraved flowers.
    by pfsmalo
  • Walking Around
    by pfsmalo
  • bpacker's Profile Photo

    Tres Petit Smart Cars in Europe

    by bpacker Written Mar 14, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Smart Car in Paris.

    If ever you're in Paris, you're bound to see these cute little things zipping around the chaotic streets like a motorcycle. Yes, it's none other than the fuel-efficient, green Smart Car.
    There's also a couple of these in Singapore as well, but none of us have really taken to these little things since everyone buys a SUV these days. Somehow, there's this inherent fear that we'll turn into Fat Bastard* if we enter into one of these things and get stuck there forever.

    *Scottish lump of fat as seen in Austin Powers , the movie.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mariev's Profile Photo

    A house made of ceramics : the Galerie Paradis

    by mariev Updated Jan 7, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Galerie Paradis - wall detail
    4 more images

    If you happen to stroll rue de Paradis (the "crokery and china" street of Paris), you may notice, among the surronding non descript buildings, a very special looking house : the Galerie Paradis
    Built in 1900 by Jacottin, it was initially the Ceramic fabricant Boulenger's main store (the factory was located in Choisy le Roi).
    The facade looks like an italian theatre and the walls are decorated with pictures made out of ceramics.
    The designs are from Arnoux and Guidetti who were also the Maison Boulenger's main designers.
    From 1978 to 1991, the house used to host the Musee de l'Affiche et de la Publicite now situated in the Louvre (in the Pavillon de Marsan).
    If you are lucky enough, you can enter the courtyard and have a closer look (or else, just catch a glimpse though the railings).

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mariev's Profile Photo

    OPERAs de PARIS : The step brother : Opera Comique

    by mariev Updated Jan 15, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Facade de l'opera comique
    1 more image

    Also known as 'Salle Favart' (it's first name) the Opera Comique, (re)built in 1887 (on the location of the previous Comte de Choiseul's private theater) is now just a secondary implementation from the Opera Garnier.

    Initially dedicated to opera comique (a now vanished form of opera) and operette, it has lost importance since the decline of those genres and the creation of the Opera Bastille.

    It now hosts the "Centre National d'Art Lyrique" (part of the opera school) and the only performances presented are french opera works sung in french (along with the new opera singers auditions).
    But, in 2006, the Opera Comique may find a new youth, after undergoing a renovation (2005), it will gain the status of 'Theatre National' (and that means more budget...)

    Address : Rue Favart/Place Boieldieu
    Metro Richelieu Drouot or Quatre Septembre

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • BeatChick's Profile Photo

    Duchamp's Dada Studio

    by BeatChick Updated Feb 12, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Duchamp's Dada Studio - 11, rue Larrey
    1 more image

    Marcel Duchamp's Studio
    11, rue Larrey

    Probably the most famous of the major dadaists (he was also considered to be cubist & surrealist), Marcel Duchamp is famous for his Nude Descending a Staircase (cubist work), his Mona-Lisa-with-a-mustache-and-beard (surrealist work - yeah, I know, you thought that was Salvador Dalì - it's ok, I forgive you!) and his urinals hung on a wall as art (well, that's dadaism for you).

    His Mona Lisa is also known as LHOOQ (elle a chaud au cul), in French pronunciation it roughly translates as "she's got a hot ass"!

    Incidentally, his urinal sculpture is deemed the most influential piece of modern artwork.

    Photos: Nov '07 & Feb '06

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • mariev's Profile Photo

    The Palais Royal and Buren's columns

    by mariev Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Buren's multi-pupose artwork
    4 more images

    The Palais Royal was built in 1629 for the Cardinal de Richelieu and given to Louis XIII after his death. It consists in two intersting parts : the palace itself and the galleries surrounding it.

    The main courtyard, with access via a vaulted passage, is now decorated with a set of 260 unequal sections of columns, striped black and white, courtesy to the sculptor Paul Buren.
    Initially (in 1986), this exhibit created a lot of controversy but is now totaly part of parisan landscape as the columns have been found useful for more than one purpose : children's games, seats, ...

    The Palais Royal houses the Council of the state, the Constitutional Council, the ministry of Culture,those can be visited only once a year (during the journées du Patrimoine - 2nd week end of September) and the Comedie Française (you can visit on appointment or each 3rd sunday of the month : http://www.comedie-francaise.fr/en/histoire/visiter_cf.php)

    The old gardens, surrounded by the galleries, hosting luxury shops, are a haven of peace

    Place du Palais-Royal, 75001 Paris
    Metro line 1 or 7 - Palais Royal-Musée du Louvre

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • BeatChick's Profile Photo

    Stairs/Streets in Paris

    by BeatChick Updated May 3, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rue Rollin - Latin Quarter
    4 more images

    What I really love about Paris are all those hills with all those beautiful stairs that double as streets and afford us a lovely sweeping views of Paris. The most obvious areas you'll find these are
    Latin Quarter:
    Rue Rollin
    Passage Jaillot
    Rue Malebranche
    Rue Jean de Beauvais

    Montparnasse:
    Rue St Yves
    Impasse Reille
    Rue Lemaignan

    Butte aux Cailles (13th arrondissement):
    Rue Eugene Atget
    Rue Dumeril (13th not Butte aux Cailles)

    Buttes-Chaumont (19th):
    Rue Michel Tagrine
    Rue Lauzin/Allée Louise Labe
    Rue Francois Pinton
    Villa Albert Robida

    But of course no place is more indicative of these than
    Montmartre:
    Passage Cottin
    Rue Girardon
    Rue des Saules
    Rue du Calvaire (with a beautiful view of Paris)
    Rue Drevet (featured in Ronin)
    Passage des Abbesses (which ends near Au Marché de la Butte featured in Amélie)
    Rue Chevalier de la Barre

    You'll have to be careful following map listings of streets in Montmartre because many times they are actually staircases. You can't drive down these streets although they certainly did it in the Bourne Identity!

    Photos: April 2003 & Feb 2006

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • mariev's Profile Photo

    Exploring the 9th district - Place St Georges

    by mariev Updated May 1, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Facade details
    1 more image

    Very close to the famous Moulin Rouge and Cabarets, near eglise Notre Dame de Lorette lies the quiet and luminous Place Saint Georges.

    On one side of the place is a peaceful square (hosting the bust of the painter Gavarni) , on the other side superbs troubadour style, statues, and medallions cover the façade of the town house occupied by Thérèse Lachman at the beginning of her career. She later became Marchioness of Paîva (marrying Mr Paiva among all her succesive husbands) and promptly left to take up a more splendid mansion on the Champs Elysées (behind what is now the HSBC change office).

    Her house (housing a financial institution) is impossible to visit but you can still admire the facades.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • shrimp56's Profile Photo

    Le Marais is for walking ... 4e

    by shrimp56 Updated Aug 24, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hollywood Bagel in Paris!
    2 more images

    And if you do wander you will find what remains of the Jewish Marais centered around rue de Rosiers. The Hamman may be a store rather than a bath and Goldenbergs may be closed, but there is still plenty to see and eat from the funky Hollywood Bagel to Sacha Finkelstein's apple strudel, latkes, pastrami, gefilte fish & chicken livers with onions.
    .
    Historically Le Marais was a swampy area outside the walls of the medieval city where the Jews and other undesirables lives. In sweet revenge the area is today one of the hippest and most interesting places to stay, eat and walk.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • jakiline's Profile Photo

    Open your ears and Enjoy Summertime Music

    by jakiline Written May 30, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    classique metropolitain orchestra

    Go to "Place des Vosges", walk around the arcades, and there you may enjoy a free lovely concert: might be classical music, or jazz, or chanson française...The acoustic under these passageways is really good.
    I first thought it was music coming out from loudspeakers (unusual here) and then I saw these musicians on the picture : it is a string orchestra playing every weekend.
    I volunteered to buy their CD 20 euros: it is a good deal (beautiful version of Vivaldi) and the money goes to their association.

    Related to:
    • Music

    Was this review helpful?

  • tango_jd's Profile Photo

    Rue Muffetard - cheese and wine anyone?

    by tango_jd Written Apr 16, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rue Mouffetard, 75005 Paris, Paris, Ile-de-France,

    A great little street with quirky shops and lots of activity.
    Combine with a walk back from the catacombs or Pantheon?
    Not too far to walk from our hotel on Rue Des Ecoles but there is a metro stop at Place Monge or Censier Daubenton nearby too.
    Google map it - it's great fun!

    Was this review helpful?

  • ForestqueenNYC's Profile Photo

    La Butte aux Cailles

    by ForestqueenNYC Updated Oct 3, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rue de la Butte aux Cailles, Sunday Afternoon
    4 more images

    Located in the 13th Arrondisement, la Buttes aux Cailles is a hilltop village within Paris with cobblestone streets. Not crowded with tourists and tacky shops as is Montmartre, it still maintains that local feeling where only Parisians live, eat, and play. In fact I had lunch in a restaurant there and the man sitting next to me was very surprised that I was there. He said that very few tourists come into that area.

    Some of these photos were taken on a Sunday afternoon during the neighborhood Fall flea market.

    It gives the feeling that you are not in Paris.

    Very close to Place d'Italie.

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Singles

    Was this review helpful?

  • ForestqueenNYC's Profile Photo

    The 14th Arrondissement

    by ForestqueenNYC Updated Sep 22, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mairie - 14th Arrondissement, 2, Place Ferdinand B
    4 more images

    UPDATE SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 I wrote this tip in 2006 not realizing that I would be returning every year since. I am once again staying in the 14th arrondissement and it has become a second home to me. If you find a hotel in this area that you like don't hesitate to stay here because people say it's too far out. It isn't. And it is a lot more peaceful than staying in the madness of the tourist area during high season. By the way there has not been a demonstration here in the last three years. So not to worry about that.

    Summer 2006
    My six months in Paris were spent living in the 14th arrondissement. My apartment was right at Place Denfer Rochereau which is unfortunately where most of the demonstrations started. It is a fabulous location as far as transportation is concerned because, in addition to several bus lines, there are the Metro lines 5 and 6 and the RER B. It is also an easy walk to Montparnasse, Saint-Germaine de Pres, Boulevard Saint Michelle, Jardin du Luxembourg, and many other locations.

    On the map it looks like it is pretty far from the center. It isn't. I often walked from here to le Marais, les Halles, the Eiffel Tower, and many other places. Just get yourself a good pair of walking shoes or take public transportation.

    There are fewer tourists here so you will experience more of a flavor of normal Paris life.

    Related to:
    • Women's Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • ForestqueenNYC's Profile Photo

    RUE DAGUERRE

    by ForestqueenNYC Updated May 18, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rue Daguerre, !4th Arrondisement, Paris

    While I would not tell you to go out of your way to see Rue Daguerre, I would say that if you want a break from the touristy areas and would like to see a real French neighborhood that is not too far out of the way then this would be a good place to go. This is a wonderful street which, for one block, is a pedestrian street. Here is where you will find the "true" Parisians, as I have heard some say. They go about their daily lives shopping at the fromagerie, or the several boucheries. On this street you will also find, a poissonerie, a couple of boulangeries and patisseries, several vegetable and fruit markets, two wine caves, as well as restaurants, and various other shops. You can stop in at my favorite neighborhood café, Café Daguerre, for a glass of wine, an express, or even a meal. They actually serve very good food at Café Daguerre.

    Though there are a number of hotels in the area, you don't find very many tourists walking about, probably because they have headed in to the tourist areas. So you will get a real taste of normal life for the middle class Parisian.

    METRO: Denfert Rochereau
    BUS: 38 and 68
    RER B: Denfert Rochereau

    Related to:
    • Singles
    • Women's Travel
    • Seniors

    Was this review helpful?

  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    See the painting, visit the street

    by sourbugger Written Oct 3, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Montorgueil - modern day
    1 more image

    Claude Monet (1840-1926) completed the painting La Rue Montorgueil à Paris. Fête du 30 juin 1878 (The Rue Montorgueil in Paris. Celebration of June 30, 1878). The celebration was actually the end of the World's fair that was held in the city that year.

    The painting is one of the highlights of the Musée d'Orsay. The painting is a swirl of the countries colours - red, white and blue. Monet apparantly painted it from a window, so although there is the very 'immediate' reportage feel to it, because it is composed froma high level it also feels strangely detached from the festivities as well.

    You can still visit the street, its in the 2nd arrondisment and compare the scenes. Nowadays it is an area well worth visting itself witha good mixture of shops, cafes and a street market.

    Was this review helpful?

  • BeatChick's Profile Photo

    Michael Osman - Tour Guide Extraordinaire

    by BeatChick Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Rue de Bretagne on Belleville Walk
    4 more images

    Michael is as nice & wonderful as you’ve read: charming, intelligent, erudite & witty. He’s extremely knowledgeable about art, architecture & history to bring Paris alive more than any guidebook. No small wonder he has a legion of fans. He currently charges 100 euros which includes as many people in the party so you may split up the cost amongst you.

    If Michael is unavailable he may suggest Scott who is equally fabulous! Had drinks with him & Michael at the Ritz, went to a Jim Haynes dinner party, Tour Montparnasse, dined at Chartier, & a VT meeting at Le Train Bleu.

    Michael gets a kick out of planning itineraries geared to your specific tastes. If you like art, tell him what types (Impressionist, Expressionist, modern, medieval) or artists. Or he could do a Da Vinci Code tour for you. Or something specific to an historic era, i.e. gothic or medieval, Renaissance, pre-Revolution, Revolution, etc.. Or a tour of Arago markers, Wallace fountains, Art Nouveau architecture, just whatever you're interested in finding in Paris! I know he does shopping tours sometimes. The more specific you are, the better he's able to plan it.

    February 2006, I spent a day with Michael by myself doing a Working Class/Belleville Tour while another day was spent with shrimp56 and Tsarina doing the Philippe-Auguste wall tour. November 2007, I spent 4 days with him and we had a wonderful time together. I'm working on a project and he was instrumental in helping me work out some of the kinks in it, suggesting shortcuts & prettier avenues.

    FYI, Michael's bday is Nov 9 and one of his fave things from home is Cream of Wheat. I brought him a box!

    Photos of the Working Class Paris tour:
    http://www.pbase.com/beatchick/sunday_february_12th&page=all

    Photos of the Philippe-Auguste Wall Tour:
    http://www.pbase.com/beatchick/saturday_february_18th&page=all

    Photos: February 2006 & November 2007

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Paris

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

43 travelers online now

Comments

View all Paris hotels