Arc de Triomphe, Paris

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Place Charles-de-Gaulle Etoile

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    Arc de Triomphe
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    View from the Arc to new arc
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    l'Arc de Triomphe Sept 18, 2010
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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Impressive

    by solopes Updated Mar 7, 2013

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    Paris - France
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    The Arc de Triomphe is one of the most famous monuments in Paris. It was commissioned in 1806 after the victory at Austerlitz by Emperor Napoleon I at the peak of his fortunes.

    Laying the foundations alone took two years, and in 1810 when Napoleon entered Paris from the west with his bride Archduchess Marie-Louise of Austria, he had a wooden mock-up of the completed arch constructed.

    The architect Jean Chalgrin died in 1811, and the work was taken over by Huyon. During the Restoration, construction was halted and would not be completed until the reign of King Louis-Philippe, in 1833–36.

    The monument stands 49.5 metres (165 ft) in height, 45 metres (148 ft) wide and 22 meters (72 ft) deep. It is the second largest triumphal arch, inspired by the Roman Arch of Titus.

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    The other six avenues (north side)

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 19, 2013

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    Avenue de la Grande Arm��e
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    From the Arc de Triomphe, the Avenue de la Grande Armée leads off roughly to the west-northwest towards La Defense. This avenue, which was named after Napoléon’s large army, is practically the continuation of the Avenue des Champs-Elysées.

    Avenue Carnot is a shorter avenue which goes off to the northwest. There have been several prominent people named Carnot, such as the physicist and military engineer Nicolas Léonard Sadi Carnot (1796-1832) and his nephew Marie François Sadi Carnot (1837-1894), who was president of France from 1887 until his assassination in 1894.

    Avenue Mac-Mahon goes off in a more northerly direction. It was named after Patrice de Mac-Mahon, Duc de Magenta, a French general (of Irish ancestry) who served as Chief of State of France from 1873 to 1875 and as the first president of the Third Republic from 1875 to 1879.

    Avenue de Wagram leads off more or less to the northeast. It was named after a battle that took place in Austria in 1809 and was of course a French victory, otherwise they wouldn’t have named the avenue after it. (You may have noticed that in Paris there is no street, avenue, square or boulevard named Waterloo. Not even an impasse.)

    Avenue Hoche goes northeast to Parc Monceau, with Sacré-Coeur visible in the distance on a hill off to the right. This avenue was named after Louis Lazare Hoche (1768–1797), who was a general in the French Revolutionary Army.

    Avenue de Friedland goes off roughly to the west. Friedland was the site of a battle (what else?) in 1807, in which Napoléon’s army defeated a Russian army in East Prussia. In the photo, Sacré-Coeur is visible on the hill off to the left.

    Next review from June 2012: Musée de l’Orangerie

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    Six of the twelve avenues (south side)

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 19, 2013

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    Avenue des Champs-Elys��es
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    From the Arc de Triomphe there are twelve major avenues that radiate out in twelve directions. That is why the location was originally called L’Étoile (The Star) – now Place Charles de Gaulle-Étoile.

    The best known of these twelve avenues is the Avenue des Champs-Elysées (Avenue of the Elysian Fields, the paradise of Greek mythology, where the souls of virtuous and heroic people went after they died). The Avenue des Champs-Elysées leads off to the southeast, towards the Place de la Concorde and the Louvre.

    Going around clockwise from the Champs-Elysées, the next avenue is the Avenue Marceau (second photo), which leads off in a more southerly direction, towards the Montparnasse Tower.

    Avenue Iéna, in the same photo, goes off towards Place d’Iéna and the Eiffel Tower.

    Avenue Kléber (third photo) goes off to the south-southeast, with the Eiffel Tower still visible at the left side of the photo. This avenue was named after a general of the French army, Jean Baptiste Kléber (1753–1800).

    Avenue Victor Hugo (fourth photo) leads off to the southeast. It was named of course after the great nineteenth century author who wrote Notre-Dame de Paris 1482, among many other works.

    Avenue Foch, with its wide light brown gravelly sidewalks (fifth photo), goes off in an easterly direction towards the woods called Bois de Boulogne. This avenue was named after another general, Ferdinand Foch (1851-1929).

    Next review from June 2012: The other six avenues (north side)

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    From the top of the Arc de Triomphe

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 19, 2013

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    To get up here, you first have to find the entrance to the pedestrian tunnel, which is on the even-numbered side of the Avenue des Champs-Elysées. Do not try to cross the traffic circle at ground level, because you won’t make it alive. It’s not like in Vietnam, where the drivers are aware of pedestrians and will swerve to miss them.

    Admission to the Arc de Triomphe currently (as of 2012) costs 8 Euros for adults and 5 Euros for students aged 18 to 25. But a lot of people can get in for free, for instance everybody up to age 17 and people under 26 who are citizens of one of the twenty-seven countries of the European Union or are non-European residents of France. Also the Arc de Triomphe is included in the Paris Museum Pass so if you have one of those you don’t have to queue up at the ticket office at the base of the arch.

    To get to the top you have to walk up the usual winding staircase, but it’s easier than most because there are two staircases, one for going up and one for going down, so the ascenders and the descenders don’t keep blocking each other’s way. There is an elevator aka lift which was out of order when I was there. I’m told it is usually out of order except when they do special tours for disabled people, in which case it miraculously starts working again. (Perhaps someone who has had experience with this can say more?) In any case, the elevator only goes up to the next-to-highest level, where the souvenir shop is, not directly up to the top.

    From the top you have marvelous views in all directions, like this one of the Eiffel Tower (first photo) with the Avenue d’Iéna off to the left and a mysterious greened building on the right.

    Other things you can see from the top of the arch include the Louvre (second photo), the Grand Palais (third photo) and of course the twelve avenues that radiate out from the arch in all directions (fourth photo). All around the viewing platform there are fences (fifth photo) which prevent you from falling off while still not impeding your view.

    Next review from June 2012: Six of the twelve avenues (south side)

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  • virtualtanielle's Profile Photo

    Paris from the top of the Arc De Triomphe

    by virtualtanielle Written Feb 18, 2013

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    Enjoyed my visit to the Arc De Triomphe, although I am not sure I would particularily love to climb all those steps again, but it is definitely one of my top 10 things to do in Paris. What was amazing was the view, really illustrates the fantastic town planning of the city, which is what makes it different from other high point. Was pleasantly suprised by the modern technology on the upper level of the Arc, specifally the 3D rotating model that lets your focus in and learn in more detail about the works of art on the building. There are toilets and seats to have a bit of rest from the cold or the steps and a lovely jam-packed souveniers shop.

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    Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

    by GentleSpirit Updated Jan 25, 2013

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    Lying beneath the Arc de Triumphe are the remains of an unknown French soldier from World War I. He was interred on Armistice Day 1920 and is honored on November 11 every year. A soldier from World War II was subsequently added.

    The original idea was to inter the unknown soldier at the Pantheon, but somehow this seemed far more appropriate. I like to visit the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier when i visit other countries, just as a sign of respect for the sacrifices soldiers make.

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    L'Arc de Triomphe

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jan 24, 2013

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    Arc view from Champs E'lysse
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    The arch and the place Charles-de-Gaulle which surrounds it, together form one of Paris' most famous landmarks. Twelve avenues radiate from the arch which explains why it is also called place de l'Etoile (etoile=star).

    The arch commemorates Nepolean's victories, evoking at the same time imperial glory and the fate of the Unknown Solider, whose tomb lies beneath. A remberance ceremony is held here every year on the 11th of November.

    If you decide to climb to the top of the arch,you will be rewarded with some excellent views of the Champs Elysee and the Eiffel Tower. There is a small museum detailing construction of the arch as well as other significant information.

    Currently the fee to visit the top of the Arc is 9€ for Adults for more information about operating hours and group fees, check out their website.

    This is one of the landmarks covered with the Museum Pass.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Nov 18, 2012

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    The Arc de Triomphe (Arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile) is one of the most famous monuments in Paris.
    The arch is at the top of a hill in the center of the huge area of the Star - Etual. The area is named so because of 12 largest arteries of city miss. Now it has another name - Charles's de Gaulle Square. Napoleon started to build an arch in 1806 in honour of the Great Army . The construction was finished in 1836. The prototype of an arch was Konstantin's Arch in Rome, but Arc de Triomphe surpassed its sizes and magnificence. It has almost square form - height of 50 meters, width - 45 meters.

    Unlike the Roman arch, it has only one flight, width of 15 meters that shelfs could pass under the Arch. Arches is decorated by huge bas-reliefs, each of which represents any fragment of history of France. The bas-relief "Marseillaise" which represents a campaign of volunteers in 1792 is most known. The basic victories of Napoleon are embodied in the top bas-reliefs, and on sculptural boards names of great battles are engraved.

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Useful Information

    by solopes Updated Aug 22, 2012

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    Paris - Arc du Triomphe

    The Arc de Triomphe is a monument in Paris, France, that stands in the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle, also known as the Place de l'Étoile (Star Square).

    It is at the western end of the Champs-Élysées. The arch honors Napoleon kings. Inside and atop the arc there are all of the names of generals and wars fought. Underneath is the tomb of the unknown soldier from World War I.

    But... Didn't you already really know that?

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  • riorich55's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe Eternal Flame Ceremony

    by riorich55 Updated Jul 16, 2012

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    Eternal Flame
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    The last time we were in Paris in 2008 we took a couple of pictures of the Arc de Triomphe from afar and rode a taxi about 3/4 of the way around. This time we decided to get a little better up close and personal look.

    We arrived about 6:15 p.m. on a Saturday afternoon and saw a gathering of military personnel and some bands. At 6:30 p.m. a ceremony started which we soon discovered is the daily Eternal Flame Ceremony. The flame is burning in memory of all the unknown soldiers from both WWI and WWII and probably other wars that the French have fought in as well.

    The ceremony started on November 11, 1923 and has been held every day, even during the German occupation of Paris during WWII, since then.

    From other information I have found it is the first eternal flame in both Western and Eastern Europe, since the Vestal Virgin's flame was extinguished in the 4th Century. The flame also served as the inspiration behind the eternal flame which is at the grave of the U.S. President John F. Kennedy in Arlington Cemetery in Washington D.C.

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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    ARCH DE TRIOMPHE

    by alyf1961 Written Apr 9, 2012
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    One of the most famous landmarks in Paris.
    Building was started on this magnificent arch in 1806 on the orders of Napoleon, to commemorate the victory of the French at the battle of Austerlitz by Emperor Napoleon. Napoleon promised his troops that “you shall go home beneath triumphal arches”.
    The arch was not completed until 1836.
    The viewing platform at the top of the arch has fabulous views of the twelve avenues that spread outwards from the roundabout including the Camps-Elyesse and the Avenue De La Grande Armee
    At the top of the arch is a row of 30 shields. Each one depicts the name of each of Napoleons victorious battles.
    The two friezes at the top show the French army going to new campaigns on the east side and then returning on the west side.
    Reliefs around the sides of the monument show scenes from famous battles such as Aboukir and Austerlitz.
    At the bottom of the arch is the tomb of the unknown French soldier from World War I.
    The Arch Du Triomphe has been used for victory parades and in 1810 after Napoleon divorced Josephine, because she could not bear him children, he married Marie-Louise. The arch wasn’t finished so he had Chalgrin, the architect build a full sized model so that the wedding party could go through it on the way to the louvre.
    In 1919 there was a victory parade by the French army through the arch. In 1944 Charles De Gaulle led a victory parade through the arch after liberation.

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    Arc de Triomph

    by Twan Updated Feb 5, 2012

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    Arc de Triomph
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    The Arc de Triomphe or the Triumphal Arch, a triumphal arch and one of the famous landmark of Paris, in the 8th arrondissement.

    The building stands on the Place Charles de Gaulle, one of the busiest roundabouts in Paris, at the western end of the Champs-Elysees, where twelve avenues converge. The arch is 50 meters high. He is the second largest in the world after the Triumphal Arch in Pyongyang in North Korea. He is so great that there is an airplane Charles Godefroy flew underneath. Construction began in 1806, in honor of one of Napoleon's victory at Austerlitz. Only around 1836, under King Louis-Philippe, the construction was completed.

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  • monica71's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe

    by monica71 Written Jan 16, 2012

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    I was overwhelmed to be so close to Arc de Triomphe and see the names of all the generals who commanded french troops in all the victories during Napoleon's reign. The arch is beautiful and it is perfectly positioned at the high end of Champs Elysee! It is a site hard to miss when driving or walking on Champs Elysee.
    A stop here is a must in my opinion.

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  • mickeyboy07's Profile Photo

    Arc De Triomphe

    by mickeyboy07 Updated Oct 24, 2011
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    The Arc is located on the right bank of the River Seine at the centre of a dodecagonal configuration of twelve radiating avenue's.It was commisioned in 1806 after the victory at Austerlitz by Emperor Napolean at the peak of his fortunes.Laying the foundations alone took two years and,in 1810,when Napolean entered Paris from the West with his bride Archduchess Marie-Louise of Austria,he had a wooden mock-up of the completed Arch constructed.The architect'Jean Chalgrin'died in 1811 and the work was taken over by 'Jean-Nicolas Huyot'.Following its construction the Arc became a rallying point for French Troops after successful military campaigns,and for the annual Bastille day parade.Many famous armies have marched through the Arc most notably,the German army in 1940 after the fall of Paris and the U.S.army after Paris was liberated in 1944.By the early sixties the monument had become blackened from coal soot and car fumes and during 1965-66 was cleaned through bleaching.

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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Oct 16, 2011

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    Arc de Triomphe - Paris
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    The Arc de Triomphe construction started in 1806 after Emperor Napoleon's victory at Austerlitz. The architect of the arc was Jean Chalgrin. It took 2 years to complete the foundations. Finalizing the construction took many years. In the course of time the architects Jean-Nicolas Huyot and Goust. In 1836 the arc was complete and in 1840 Napoleon's remains passed under it on their way to the Emperor's final resting place at the Invalides

    In 1919 the first aeroplane flew through the arc; many would follow.

    The monument stands 50 metres in height, 45 meters wide and 22 meters deep.

    Beneath the Arc is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from the First World War with the eternal flame.

    On the walls of the arc 660 names are inscribed.

    To goto to the arc use the subway tunnel.
    Vistit to the top is Euro 9,--. The climb is via a spiral staircase.

    Visiting hours:
    1 April to 30 September : 10AM - 11PM
    1 October to 31 March : 10AM - 10:30PM
    Last admission 30 mins before closing

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