Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, Paris

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  • Arc de Triomphe du Carrusel
    Arc de Triomphe du Carrusel
    by mindcrime
  • Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel
    Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel
    by balhannah
  • Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel
    Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel
    by balhannah
  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    The Arc de Triomphe de Carousel

    by IreneMcKay Updated Jul 4, 2014
    L'Arc de Triomphe de Carousel
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    The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel is located in the Place du Carrousel. It is built on the site of the former Tuileries Palace. Construction of this arch began in 1806 and was completed in 1808. It was originally built to commemorate the victories of the Emperor Napoleon. It is half the size of the Arc de Triomphe.

    The arch was originally adorned with the famous horses of Saint Mark's Cathedral in Venice. These had been captured and stolen from St Mark's in 1798 by Napoleon.

    In 1815, following the Battle of Waterloo, France handed over these statues to the Austrian Empire and they were returned to Venice. The horses were replaced by a sculpture created by Baron François Joseph Bosio. This sculpture shows Peace riding in a triumphal chariot with gilded Victories on each side.

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    Arc du Carusel

    by mindcrime Written Mar 25, 2014

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    Arc de Triomphe du Carrusel
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    I never manage to catch a good pic of this monument on a sunny day, it’s because usually I plan to visit Louvre (that is located 150m away) on a cloudy/rainy day. The only difference between my 2 photos is that I had a better camera with me in 2014 than in 2005 :) So I decided to put the backside from my first visit and the front side from my visit on march 2014.

    Arc de Triomphe du Carrusel is 19m high monumental triumphal arch that was designed in early 19th century along with the most famous and much bigger Arc de Triomphe de l’Etoile, both of them to commemorate Napoleon’s military victories as the romans used to do in the past (it is modeled after the Arch of Constantine in Rome). Originally the arch was built as a gateway to the Tuileries palace but the palace was destroyed during the paris commune (1871) so now stands alone as a smaller sister of the bigger arc de Triomphe that stands 3km to the west and the Grand Arc of Defense (8km west), all of them on the same line. You can still imagine the palace as you walk along the Jardins des Tuileries, there are some nice sculptures along with fountains and ponds but the unbroken shading of grey black in the sky didn’t leave me any choice, I got into the metro station Tuileries (line 1) and promised myself to visit it again during a sunny day in the future.

    The arch has many bas-reliefs about Napoleon’s victories but also sculptures and statues, eight of them on top of the eight Corinthian columns that hug the arch. On top we see Peace riding in a triumphal chariot but original Napoleon had stolen the horses from St Mark’s Cathedral in Venice to top the arch! (they returned back to Venice in 1815).

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    ARC DE TRIOMPHE DU CARROUSEL

    by balhannah Written Mar 2, 2013

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    Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel
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    The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel is just a short walk from the Louvre. This Triumphal Arch is a copy of the Arch of Constantine in Rome. Napoleon had it built between the years 1807 to 1808 to celebrate the victory of the French imperial army in Austerlitz. It is beautifully decorated with many bas-reliefs depicting the Peace of Pressburg, the 1805 campaign (Napoleon entering Munich, Napoleon entering Vienna, the Battle of Austerlitz, the Tilsit Conference) and the surrender of Ulm.
    The eight marble Corinthian pillars are topped with statues of soldiers from Napoleon's army.

    Located on top of the arch, are four bronze horses, not the ones stolen by Napoleon from St. Mark's Square in Venice, these were returned after Napoleon's downfall at Waterloo. These are replicas.
    A figure of Napoleon was supposed to be put in the chariot, he didn't want this, so the Chariot stayed empty. Since restoration in 1828, an allegoric figure has taken the place of the emperor. It is flanked by statues symbolizing Victory and Peace.

    Not as big as the Arc de Triomphe, but still worth stopping and having a look at. I thought it was a real work of art.

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  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    The Smaller Arc de Triomphe

    by zadunajska8 Written Jan 12, 2013

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    The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel
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    The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel used to be an entrance to the Palais des Tuileries and was built by Napoleon in 1806-1808. Whilst being much smaller than the more famous Arc de Triomphe it is still in the same stright line which links a number of key Paris landmarks, starting here with the Louvre and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel and heading west through the obselisk in Place de la Concorde, down the Champs-Elysées to the Arc de Triomphe and then on to La Grande Arche at La Défense.

    The Rose marble bas-reliefs depict various victories of Napoleon including the Peace of Pressburg, the Battle of Austerlitz and Napoleon entering Vienna and Munich. It's very derivative of the arch of Septimus Severus in the Forum in Rome

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  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    Arch of the Carrousel

    by GentleSpirit Updated Nov 26, 2012

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    This is the triumphal arch built by Napoleon in 1806-8 to celebrate his previous military victories.
    It is built where the Tuilieries Palace used to be before it was destroyed during the time of the Paris Commune.

    This triumphal arch is not a replica of the much larger Arc de Triumphe, which is about twice its size and took 30 years to build.

    It is neat to see how the architects aligned the monuments in Paris. You will see this monument after you leave the Louvre.

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  • adema29's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel

    by adema29 Updated Dec 9, 2011

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    Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel

    Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel... it is easy to observe how close is the design of it with the design of Constantine’s Arch in Rome with the three unequal arches and four Corinthian columns on each side.
    Of course, the Dacians from Rome were replaced by statues of Napoleon’s soldiers.

    As a digression, it is said that the statues of the Dacians on Constantine’s Arch are “the statues of Dacian’s prisoners”.
    I’m wondering who in this World have ever made statues with “prisoners” ?!
    Should we say instead that the Dacians on the Arch are probably some Dacians Heroes from those Dacians Wars?!

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel

    by leffe3 Updated Dec 26, 2010
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    Not the more famous Arc de Triomphe (de i'Etoile to give it its full name) but the much smaller yet older Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel is to be found between the Louvre and the Place de la Concorde.

    The triumphal arch was built by Napoleon in 1806-08 to commemorate his various victories. The more famous Arc de Triomphe de i'Etoile was designed the same year, but being more than twice the size, took some 30 years to build.

    Carrousel originally stood at the entrance to the Palais du Tulieries (which was burnt down in the 1870s) and now forms a perfectly aligned axis with the Arc de Triomphe and the Champs Elysees, as well as the Grande Arch de la Defense 9 kms away (although the latter cannot be seen from the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel).

    Originally, the Carrousel was topped with the horses from St Mark's Cathedral in Venice, taken by French Forces in 1798. But these were returned ten years after the unveiling of the Carrousel and replaced by statues depicting Peace riding a triumphal chariot led by 4 horses and gilded Victories.

    Today it stands surrounded on three sides by the Louvre Museum, 2 wings of which were added in the late 19th century after the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel was built.

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    Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel

    by Chuckaziz Updated Dec 9, 2009
    Sculputures Atop the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel

    The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel is a triumphal arch located close to the Louvre Palace. The top of the Arc has a chariot with a team of horses. The sculptures of the horses, chariot and figure atop the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel were built by Baron François Joseph Bosio in 1828.

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  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    The Carrousel Arc de Triomphe

    by cjg1 Written Feb 7, 2009

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    The Carrousel Arc de Triomphe was is at the netrance of the Louvre. It was buily bt Napoleon I to celebrate the battle of Austerlitz. The arch is topped by for horses pulling a triumphant chariot. The detail of the arch was beautiful and it was amazing walking under the arch.

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  • tiabunna's Profile Photo

    Arc du Carrousel

    by tiabunna Written Nov 30, 2007

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    Arc du Carrousel
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    Having already included tips on the Arc de Triomphe and the other Arches of St-Martin and St-Denis, I really should include one on the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel (to give its full title). It’s easy to find, right between the Louvre and the Tuilleries Gardens.

    Erected to celebrate Napoleon’s victories of 1805, it originally was crowned by four gilt horses taken from St Mark’s in Venice. The current statuary includes Victory in a chariot with four horses. This is far from being the largest victory arch in Paris, but with the green and gold statues on top, plus the pink columns, I reckon it probably ranks as the most spectacular. What do you think?

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  • thinking's Profile Photo

    What is the Arc de Triomphe?

    by thinking Written Aug 13, 2006

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    at night
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    The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel (architects Percier and Fontaine) was built between 1806 and 1808 by Napoleon I following the model of the Arc of Constantine in Rome. I will put a photo of both so you can compare them for yourself.

    The two arches built by Napoleon - Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel and the Arc de Triomphe at Etoile, were to commemorate his victories, and the grand army who had won them. The bronze horses on top of the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel were taken from Saint-Marc of Venice. These were later returned after WWII.

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