Champs Elysées, Paris

4 out of 5 stars 4 Stars - 178 Reviews

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • Champs Elysées
    Champs Elysées
    by mindcrime
  • Champs Elysees
    Champs Elysees
    by chatterley
  • statue of Charles de Gaulle
    statue of Charles de Gaulle
    by mindcrime
  • mindcrime's Profile Photo

    walk from the Triumph Arc to Concord square

    by mindcrime Updated Mar 25, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Champs Elys��es as seen from Triumph Arc
    4 more images

    Champs Elysées (Elysian Fields ) is one of the most famous avenues in the world.
    It starts from Arc de Triomphe at "Charles de Gaulle-Etoile" and ends down after 2.2km at Place de la Concorde which is the largest square of Paris.

    Along the avenue you can find some extra expensive stores (Louis Vuiton, Prada, Cartier etc) full of luxury products which are nice for window shopping only. There are also a lot of cafes and restaurants too (and yes, most of them have ridiculous high prices). Most of times I’ve been here was because I wanted to take something from FNAC (usually a concert ticket). According to the greek myth Elysian Fields was the place where happy souls dwelt after death but here is were happy shoppers with large wallets arrive :)

    What I liked most was the wide sidewalks with the long tree lines. Don’t forget that Champs Elysees were built with wide sidewalks for the rich people that were showing off here during the Belle Époque at the end of 19th century. My good VT friend Nemorino told me the sidewalks were restored in the 1990s after half a century of abuse as a huge open-air parking lot for cars.

    In our days this is the avenue where the official parades take place

    Pic 5 shows the 3.6m tall bronze statue of general Charles de Gaulle on the lower end of the avenue. It was made by Jean Cardot showing the general ready to march down to Arc de Triomphe in a liberated Paris (august 26, 1944).

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Flying.Scotsman's Profile Photo

    Motoring enthusiasts on the Champs-Elysées

    by Flying.Scotsman Written Feb 24, 2014
    1 more image

    The Champs-Elysées has many upmarket shops, includingshops for motoring and autosports enthusiasts. Peugot, Citröen, and Renault all have showrooms with items to buy, and displays different from your local dealer. We visited the Renault showroom on our visit in January 2014 and I was treated to a brilliant display; an Etoile Filante speed record holder from 1956. When I sent these photographs to my brother, he said that it reminded him of the cars he used to draw on his jotter in French class.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    Shopfronts on the Champs Elysees

    by Maryimelda Written Jan 19, 2014
    4 more images

    The shopfronts of the high end stores on the Champs Elysees are without a doubt equal to or better than any you will find anywhere in the world. If like me, you can't really afford to shop on this famous street (unless you want to pick up a few necessities at Monoprix) then you can enjoy just checking out all of the elaborate shop fittings and decor and take a few pics to bring home.

    This is window dressing at its very best and certainly worth a trip to see and enjoy.

    My favourite has got to be the see through man outside Purcell at No. 26.

    Related to:
    • Luxury Travel
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    It used to be even worse!

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 26, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Nighttime traffic on the Champs-��lys��es
    1 more image

    In one word I can tell you what's wrong with the Avenue des Champs-Élysées: cars.

    This street is marketed as "the most beautiful avenue in the world", and it really is beautiful except for the fact that there is an ugly ten-lane highway running right down the middle. There are four lanes of moving motor traffic in each direction (moving or creeping, as the case may be, or accelerating wildly when the traffic lights change), plus two lanes of parked cars on either side.

    If I have measured correctly, the entire avenue is about 67 meters wide. Of that width, roughly 25 meters in the middle is devoted to motor vehicles, with a 21-meter sidewalk for pedestrians on each side. There are no bicycle lanes, at least not yet (as of 2011), but the council has promised to install bicycle lanes in both directions by 2014.


    While the current situation is unsatisfactory, to say the least, I keep reminding myself that for over half a century, from the late 1930s to the early 1990s, it was worse -- much worse, since nearly the entire width of the avenue was given over to cars.

    By the 1970s, even car-loving conservative politicians couldn't help noticing that the character of the Champs-Élysées was changing. The grand hotels, luxury boutiques and elegant restaurants began to leave, being replaced by chain stores and fast-food joints.

    So from 1991 to 1994 a sweeping rearrangement of the Champs-Élysées was carried out under the direction of the French architect and urbanist Bernard Huet (1932-2001).

    Much of the construction work was coordinated by the engineering firm OGI (Omnium Général d'Ingénierie), which summarized the project as follows:

    "The rearrangement of the Champs Élysées consisted of restoring the character of a promenade to an avenue which had become an immense open-air parking lot. To do this, the side roads were eliminated, a second row of trees was planted and the entire surface of the pedestrian area was re-paved in granite." (My translation.)

    Planting a second row of trees may not sound like a huge project, especially since it was just a matter of replacing a row of trees that had been cut down in the 1930s to make room for cars, but in fact this turned out to be a long and very expensive project because in the meantime the dirt under the sidewalk had been replaced by a labyrinth of cables, water pipes, gas pipes, sewer pipes and tunnels, all of which had to be found and relocated.

    Why I shun the crass, expensive, naff Champs Elysees by Hugh Schofield on the BBC News website.

    Second photo: As you stroll along these wide granite-paved sidewalks today, it is hard to believe that for over half a century most of this surface was used for car parking. But it was.

    There are about a dozen Vélib' stations on side streets near the Champs-Élysées, but none on the avenue itself. The ones I have used most recently are stations 8028 at 1 Rue Arsene Houssaye and 8003 at 63 Rue Galilée.

    Related to:
    • Cycling

    Was this review helpful?

  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Christmas market on the Champs-Elysées.

    by breughel Updated Dec 9, 2013

    5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Illuminated trees on the Champs-Elys��es
    2 more images

    It was only in 2008 that for the first time a Christmas market was held on the Champs-Elysées from the Rond-Point to the Concorde.
    It was for Paris something new and attracted at lot of Parisiens as well as tourists who happened to be there like my wife and I.
    Very nice were the more than 400 trees illuminated with bleu lights. Behind the Concorde at the Tuileries stands the illuminated Grande Roue. This is a great vision.
    Ninety white country cottages lit by blue LED were installed on the Champs-Elysées offering traditional or more modern products coming from various countries from the EU.
    I must say that the shops were rather banal by themselves. Really worthwhile on the Champs-Elysées are the Illuminations.
    I still think that if you want to have a more romantic Christmas atmosphere you are better at the Christmas markets in the Alsace.

    This year the VILLAGE DE NOEL DES CHAMPS-ELYSEES is open from 15/11/2013 till 5/01/2014 every day from 11 to 23 h (24 h on WE).
    Illuminations from 17 h - 02 h. Special illuminations on 24/12 and 31/12.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Champs Elysees

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 7, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Champs Elysees
    4 more images

    Main Boulvard of Paris. It starts at the Louvre and ends at the Arc De Triomphe. Although Dominated by tourist shops, restaurants and chain stores this is a great place for a walk and some window shopping. However for a more authentic Paris experience heads towards Rue Moutefard in the Latin Quarter or Montemarte.

    Related to:
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Spontini's La Vestale at the Champs-Élysées

    by Nemorino Written Oct 30, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    La Vestale posters in the M��tro
    4 more images

    Gaspare Spontini (1774-1851) was an Italian opera composer who spent many years in Paris and later in Berlin. His best-known opera, La Vestale, was first performed in Paris in 1807.

    In this opera Licinius, a victorious Roman general, returns to Rome in triumph only to discover that his fiancée, Julia, had given hope of ever seeing him again and was now a Vestal Virgin, a priestess of the goddess Vesta who had taken a vow of chastity for thirty years.

    When Licinius visits Julia at the temple one night, they are so busy singing love duets that she lets the sacred fire go out. For this she is sentenced to death, but the rule is that she has to take off her white shawl and lay it on the altar. If it spontaneously catches fire, that is a sign that the goddess has pardoned her, otherwise she has to die. Of course it does catch fire – one of her colleagues puts a torch to it while no one is looking – so Julia and Licinius can get married and live happily ever after.

    In October 2013 I saw a marvelous production of La Vestale at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris, with the American tenor Andrew Richards as Licinius and the Albanian soprano Ermonela Jaho as Julia. The singing, acting and staging were all superb, and the happy ending really did look happy, with the chorus chasing the loving couple around the stage to the strains of Spontini’s ballet music.

    The white smoke on the opera posters (first photo) is the smoke from the burning shawl which proves that the goddess has pardoned Julia.

    Further tips/reviews on the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées:
    Théâtre des Champs-Élysées
    Don Giovanni at the Champs-Élysées, 2006 and 2013
    Concert at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, 2012
    Bourdelle and the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées

    More on the American tenor Andrew Richards:
    Brussels intro page
    Strasbourg intro page
    Carmen by Georges Bizet (1838-1875) in the Arena of Verona, Italy
    Andrew Richards, tenor

    Next Paris review from October 2013: Museum of Jewish Art and History

    Related to:
    • Theater Travel
    • Music

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Théâtre des Champs-Élysées

    by Nemorino Updated Oct 26, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Th����tre des Champs-��lys��es
    4 more images

    This theater is not on the Avenue des Champs-Élysées, but is several blocks from there near the Place de l'Alma on the right bank of the Seine. This is a very swanky district of Paris, in fact the whole neighborhood reeks of money.

    Of all the opera venues I went to this was the one with the highest percentage of men wearing suits and ties, maybe 35 or 40 percent. These looked to be high-powered business types who had come directly from their air-conditioned offices in their air-conditioned chauffer-driven automobiles. But the theater itself was not adequately air-conditioned, so it was amusing to watch some of these chaps (not all) finally give in and start taking off their jackets and loosening their ties.

    The theater is unusual in that it is barely a century old, having been built in 1913. It is said to be one of the few major examples of Art Nouveau in Paris. The stage is small and has little in the way of fancy machinery, so to change sets that have to lower the curtain and play a scene or two in front of it while armies (evidently) of stage hands change everything around by muscle-power, not without all the old-timey thumping and thudding sounds that you don't hear any longer in modernized theaters where everything is done by hydraulics or electricity.

    Second photo: Looking up at the façade.

    Third photo: Looking southwest along the Avenue Montaigne past the entrance to the theater.

    Fourth photo: Stage entrance.

    Fifth photo: Opps, there's only one man wearing a suit and tie in this photo. So you'll have to take my word for it that there were more inside.

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Theater Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Don Giovanni at the Champs-Élysées, 2006 and 2013

    by Nemorino Updated May 15, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Don Giovanni at the Champs-��lys��es, 2006
    4 more images

    The opera I saw in 2006 at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées was Mozart's Don Giovanni. It was a festival of voices with world-class singers including Lucio Gallo and Anna Bonitatibus, both of who have given gala performances in Frankfurt, and Patricia Ciofi, whom I had seen on television but never live.

    The setting in this production was a somewhat seedy little seaside town in present-day Spain or Italy, with Don Giovanni as a somewhat pimpish local potentate. What really impressed me was the ending, in which stage director Andre Engel managed to combine the last two scenes (I've never seen that done before). And after all these many years (this opera is 219 years old, after all) he even came up with a surprise ending.

    Shall I tell you what it is? After the final jubilation chorus about how he got what was coming to him, Don Giovanni emerged unscathed from the flames, dusted off his dapper three-piece suit and stood there with a triumphant smirk on his face as the curtain fell.

    Update: In May 2013 I saw the same opera in the same theater -- but in a different production with a different cast. Musically it was again first-rate and the audience was very enthusiastic. Prolonged rhythmic clapping at the final bows. A great thing for me was that two old friends from Frankfurt were in the cast this time: Miah Persson as Donna Elvira and Daniel Behle as Don Ottavio.

    Second and third photos: The audience in the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées, 2006.

    Fourth photo: People in the lobby of the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées, 2013.

    Fifth photo: In the auditorium, 2013.

    Related tips:
    Théâtre des Champs-Élysées
    Concert at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, 2012

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Music
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    Champs Elysees

    by Maryimelda Updated Mar 19, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    This has got to be the most fantastic street in the world. There is so much to see here at any time of the day or night. The last time I was on the Champs Elysses, there was an exhibition tracing the history of Vogue magazine and all of the front covers of Vogue were displayed up and down the thoroughfare. I could have spent many hours studying them all. I had the gypsy gold ring scam tried out on me too but for once in my life I was quick thinking enough to recognise that I was being targeted immediately. I had seen so much written about it on VT, I would have been extremely slow and incredibly stupid not to have picked up on it. I was so proud of myself.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • GentleSpirit's Profile Photo

    The Grand Avenue

    by GentleSpirit Updated Mar 11, 2013

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The Avenue des Champs-Élysées is easily one of the most famous avenues in the world.

    Surprisingly, it is not nearly as long as one might think. It is actually only 1.9 km long, running from the Place de la Concorde to the Place Charles de Gaulle (Etoile.) The avenue ends at the Arc de Triumphe.

    Take your time and just stroll down the avenue. Make sure you have money in your pockets. There is lots of expensive shopping to be done, great cafes and restaurants.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    MOST FAMOUS STREET IN THE WORLD?

    by balhannah Updated Mar 8, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Avenue des Champs-Elysees
    3 more images

    Is the Avenue des Champs-Elysees the most famoust street in the World or just in Paris.... ? Which is it?

    This impressive Avenue, built in the 17th century, stretches from the Place la Concorde to the Place Charles de Gaulle, the site of the Arc de Triomphe. The Hop on/off Bus is taking us along the Avenue and we are looking at the majestic buildings lining the avenue, the luxury gardens with fountains, the roadside neatly trimmed trees and grand buildings including the Grand and Petit Palais.
    Tourist's like me, are going to the theater, shopping, going to a restaurant or just window shopping infront of Chanel, Christian Dior, Guy Laroche, and others. It's a busy street, full of both cars and pedestrians.

    This is where major celebrations are held, like New Years Eve, the 14th of July military parade as well as the arrival of the Tour de France cycling race in July.

    It was at stop 7, on the avenue we alighted from the Hop on/off tour bus, quite near to the Arc de Triomphe.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Concert at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, 2012

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 19, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    After the concert
    4 more images

    In June 2012 I went back to the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées on Avenue Montaigne, this time to attend a benefit concert with the Ensemble Matheus, conducted by Jean-Christophe Spinosi, featuring six prominent singers who often perform in French opera houses.

    The ladies in my first photo are, from left to right, the mezzo-sopranos Stephanie d’Oustrac and Karine Deshayes and the soprano Cassandre Berthon.

    Actually my main reason for going to this particular concert was to hear Cassandre Berthon, with whom I was slightly acquainted when she sang in Frankfurt am Main in the 1990s.

    Fourth photo: Here all six singers are taking their bows at the end of the concert. The three men are the baritone Ludovic Tézier, whom I once saw in Brussels in the title role of Massenet’s Werther, baritone Nigel Smith and bass Nicolas Cavallier.

    Next review from June 2012: Paris still has a huge car problem

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Theater Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • solopes's Profile Photo

    "Vanity Fair"

    by solopes Updated Jun 18, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Paris - France
    1 more image

    Tradition, elegance, sophistication are words that merge in this famous avenue.

    It keeps its classical image, but here and there a few dots of modernity are useful to remember that time doesn't stop.

    It's funny to compare the actual look with the memories of several decades ago!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • gwened's Profile Photo

    The most beautiful avenue in the world

    by gwened Written Apr 30, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Like no other avenue in the world C-E
    4 more images

    the avenue des Champs Elysées, indeed the most beautiful avenue in the world. All you need is here, shopping and eateries, plus sights along and on the edge like the GRand and petit palais,pl de la concorde it begins to the arc the triomphe.

    Glorious Paris and the world seems to agree. At least once you should walk the entire avenue, and see the beauty of it in the webpage officially made to showcase its many things to do.
    Cheers up Paris

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Paris

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

75 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Champs Elysées
4.0 out of 5 stars
48 Opinions
0 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
707 Opinions
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
63 Opinions
0.1 miles away
Show Prices

View all Paris hotels