Jardin des Plantes, Paris

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  • Jardin des Plantes
    Jardin des Plantes
    by Nemorino
  • Jardin des Plantes
    Jardin des Plantes
    by Nemorino
  • Comte de Buffon
    Comte de Buffon
    by Nemorino
  • gwened's Profile Photo

    Jardin des Plantes

    by gwened Updated Jun 17, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    jardin des Plantes
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    a wonderful oasis in the middle of old Paris, and found me a picture on my cd roms library lol!!

    Four greenhouses in metal frame are aligned along the garden. They offer visitors:a winter garden (750 m2), in hot and humid climate (22 ° C). Art deco style, the greenhouse is the work of architect René Berger (1937). It includes a stream, ficus, Palm trees, banana trees, vines and epiphytes, plants etc.a greenhouse known as Mexican, work of Rohault de Fleury (1834-1836), precursor of metallic architecture in France. It is a characteristic of arid environments of America, Southern Africa and Madagascar: cactus, euphorbias, agaves, avocado, coffee, pepper, etc.a greenhouse Australia and New Caledonia, also designed by Rohault de Fleury...and a so-called greenhouse paleobotany which presents the stages of the development of the flora from the emergence of terrestrial plants, 430 million years ago.

    Located along the Gallery of Mineralogy, the rose garden is designed to study and present to the public the various subspecies of roses, classified in a reasoned manner. It includes 170 varieties of European roses, planted along the aisle Haüy (from the name of the Abbé Haüy, pioneer of Mineralogy), which runs along the Gallery of Botany and geology. It is decorated with two statues, prisioner of love by Félix Sanzel and gentrified Venus by Charles Dupaty.A school of Botany and an ecological garden align between the greenhouses and the Seine: the first presents the plants by families and helps to understand their characteristics, the second is a composite of the Paris region, where there is plant and animal populations in their natural evolution.Comprising 4,500 varieties of plants and shrubs, school of Botany was created by the André Thouin to the 18th century botanist. It aims to make reasoned public and botanists species that may live in the open air in Europe. It also includes historic trees. Several weekly classes are taught by the gardeners of the Museum.Between the school of Botany and the menagerie, du jardin alpin, created in 1931 (instead of a nursery), aims to study the shrubby plants and herbs of mountain environments around the world (Himalayas, Alps, Corsica). There are more than 2,000 plants on two areas connected by an underground passageway. This garden has a male pistachio from which the botanist Sébastien Vaillant mit highlight the sexuality of plants in the 18th century.

    The menagerie is the second oldest Zoo in the world. It was created in 1793 at the initiative of Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, by the transfer of the animals of the Royal menagerie at Versailles and the fairground and private menageries. During the Paris commune, the animals were eaten by the beleaguered Parisians.During its history, it introduced countless animal species, including the first giraffe presented in France (1827), elephants, white, seals and brown bears.Many buildings, sometimes sophisticated for the time, were built for this purpose in the 19th and at the beginning of the 20th century, succeeding the pens and cages summary from the beginning: Rotunda, ditches to bears, antics, fauveries, Raptor and reptile houses, faisanderies. The largest of them is undoubtedly the large aviary built in 1888 by Alphonse Milne-Edwards for the universal exhibition of 1889 and still used. The larger species (elephant, giraffe, lion, Tiger, Gorilla, chimpanzee, bears), impossible to maintain properly in small facilities and impossible to expand, in the centre of Paris, gradually left the menagerie in the years 1970 to 2000.Today, it houses 1,100 animals, mammals, reptiles and birds, on 5.5 acres. She specializes in several groups of animals: mammals, the Przewalski horse, the orangutan, several species of goats (goat of the Rocky Mountains, takin, blue sheep, ibex of Ethiopia), small carnivores, rodents and the bushes; in birds, vultures and nocturnal raptors are well represented, as well as pheasants and some wading birds (spoonbills, ibis, cranes, bird and the very rare crested Lucy); many reptiles (including giant tortoises many 100 years old ), the amphibians and insects are raised in the House of reptiles and vivarium .

    just a world to visit on its own, Paris has many things to see...

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Jardin des Plantes

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 27, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Jardin des Plantes
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    This large botanical garden was founded by King Louis XIII as the Royal Garden of Medicinal Plants in 1635. Unlike most royal gardens it was opened to the public as early as 1640.

    Most parts of the garden are free, but there are admission charges for the greenhouses and the museums.

    My first photo shows the garden as seen from the main entrance near the Seine at Place Valhubert, not far from the Batobus stop “Jardin des Plantes”.

    The statue in the first photo is of Jean-Baptiste de Lamarck (pronunciation here), a French naturalist who lived from 1744 to 1829.

    The large building in the background is the Grand Gallery of Evolution.

    Second photo: Looking back from the top of the garden.

    Third and fourth photos: The statue at the top end of the garden is of Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon (1707-1788). Buffon was the director of the Jardin des Plantes, an important scientist and a prolific scientific author. His main work was a monumental thirty-six volume Natural History, General and Particular, which was widely read and translated into several different languages during his lifetime. The entire text of these thirty six volumes is now available online, in the original French, at the website www.buffon.cnrs.fr/. Both Buffon and Lamarck made important contributions to the emerging theory of evolution, before it was all brought together by Charles Darwin.

    When you look at the statue from the front, Buffon seems to be sitting on a lion, but from the side you can see that he is sitting on a chair and the lion is under the chair. The lion does not look happy, however.

    Next review from July 2012: The Grand Gallery of Evolution

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    Jardin des Plantes

    by Dabs Written Sep 22, 2011

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    We found the Jardin des Plantes quite by accident, we had left the Institut du Monde Arabe and were walking along the Seine towards a metro station when I spotted a mama camel and her baby camel through the bushes. The entrance to the Jardin des Plantes was just a little way down the streeet and as the day was still nice, we enjoyed a stroll through the gardens

    There has been a garden here since 1635 when it was the royal garden of medicinal plants under Louis XIII, it became the Jardin des Plantes after the French Revolution. The gardens are free to visit, around the perimeter of the gardens are the menagerie (zoo), the Museum of Natural History, greenhouses and several other galleries that have separate admission fees.

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    Jardin des Plantes

    by spidermiss Updated Nov 30, 2010

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    This botanical garden was opened in 1640 for King Louis XIII. The gardens developed during the 18th and 19th Centuries where an amphitheatre and exhibition galleries were built along with a small zoo. The Galerie de Zoologie was opened in 1889 for explorers returning with millions of specimens from their expeditions abroad and for display. Also in the park there is the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle which houses the Grande Galerie de l'Evolution.

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    • Family Travel
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  • Jefie's Profile Photo

    A walking tour of Jardin des Plantes, Part II

    by Jefie Updated May 2, 2007

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    Where Verlaine died and Hemingway wrote!
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    From Place de la Contrescarpe, you can retrace your steps a bit on rue Descartes until you reach No. 39. This is where French poet Paul Verlaine died on January 8, 1896, and it is also where Hemingway rented a room on the top-floor which he used as a place to write.

    You can then go back to Place de la Contrescarpe and onto rue Mouffetard, one of the oldest streets in Paris. You'll find countless shops, boutiques, markets and restaurants on both sides of this pedestrian street, and it therefore offers a nice alternative to eating in the Latin Quarter.

    You can follow rue Mouffetard all the way down the hill, which will take you to Saint-Medard church. This little church is famous for supposedly having been the site of numerous miracles, which resulted into a fit of mass hysteria that forced the authorities to close the church in 1732, which in turn prompted an anonymous prankster to put up a sign that said "By order of the King, God is forbidden to perform miracles in this church".

    From there you are only a few steps away from the metro station Censier Daubenton, on to your next destination!

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    A walking tour of Jardin des Plantes, Part I

    by Jefie Written May 2, 2007

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    Hemingway's first appartment in Paris
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    The Jardin des Plantes area is located next to the Latin Quarter. It used to be a not-so-rich area, where people could get drunk at a fairly cheap price on Place de la Contrescarpe, and this is where Hemingway lived when he first arrived in Paris. The neighborhood has changed a bit over the years and it no longer is considered a poor area, but thankfully some things haven't changed: Place de la Contrescarpe is still a good place to stop for drinks and rue Mouffetard remains one of the liveliest streets in the city!

    This walking tour starts at the Cardinal-Lemoine metro station. You can walk up rue Cardinal-Lemoine in the direction of Place de la Contrescarpe. No. 74 Cardinal-Lemoine is where Hemingway rented his first appartment in Paris. There's a commemorative plaque on the building with a quote from Hemingway's "A Moveable Feast" that goes: "But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy".

    You can now keep walking until you reach Place de la Contrescarpe, where the sidewalk terraces of the cafes are always packed with students from the nearby university. A non-stop succession of street performers creates a lively atmosphere, and this is where we found the cheapest beer in Paris (!) - if you haven't already tried it, I suggest you go for a Desperados, a tequila-lime flavoured beer that is sure to quench your thirst!

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