Jardin des Tuileries, Paris

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  • Jardin des Tuileries (In April 2009)
    Jardin des Tuileries (In April 2009)
    by spidermiss
  • Here is a table just for you!
    Here is a table just for you!
    by Beausoleil
  • One of the avenues, Jardin des Tuileries
    One of the avenues, Jardin des Tuileries
    by goodfish
  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The Jardin des Tuileries

    by kris-t Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Jardin des Tuileries is one of Paris's most visited gardens centraly located between the Louvre and Place de la Concorde.

    It features many sculptures, several fountains and two museums, the Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume and the Musée de l'Orangerie, which displays Claude Monet's large water lily paintings .
    Those two museums buildings are the only remains of the original Palais de Tuileries.

    Opening times - All year. Daily.
    Admission - Entrance free

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  • mariev's Profile Photo

    A "green heart" of Paris : les Tuileries

    by mariev Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Perspective sur le Louvre
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    Situated between the Carrousel du Louvre and the place de la Concorde, along the banks of the Seine , the Jardin des Tuileries offers, in 25 hectares of greenery, a large collection of sculptures from the 17th to the 21st century and is one of the favorites parisian children recreation places.

    The gardens have replaced the former Tuileries palace, destroyed during the 1871 Paris Commune and whose only remnants are the musée du Jeu de Paume, the Musée de l'Orangerie and the surrounding walls.

    The gardens have retained the basic elements of Le Nôtre's design after having undergone important renovations in 1996. It now combines plants, flowers, sculptures (i's a open air museum) and kids activities (pony rides, merry go round, gardening lessons, fishes to feed ...).
    In July and August, there is a small fair on the Terrasse des Feuillants (merry go round, balls throwing, ...).

    The Musee de l'Orangerie has been closed and under work since years and wiil reopen on May 5 2006.
    During the renovation remnants of older walls (medieval) were discovered and had to be treated to become a part of the open air museum the gardens are.

    A detail not often noticed by passers by : in the wall - rue de Rivoli, below the musee du jeu de paume, you can see a memorial, i would call it 'to human stupidity' : there are the funeral urns of several soldiers, look at the plates : they were all killed on August 14 1944 - between 10 and 12 am : When Paris liberation was signed !

    More photos here

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  • chatterley's Profile Photo

    Beautiful Public Park and Garden

    by chatterley Updated Nov 29, 2010
    Jardin des Tuileries
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    This park is very near to our apartment, and we would walk here every morning and evening. Besides the well-manicured trees and colourful flowers and ponds and fountains, it also has many sculptures and statues, some cafes and restaurants etc. Its location is between the Lourve and the Place de la Concorde. The Orangerie Museum is also located here.

    This place has many visitors, both local and tourists. Though it is teeming with people, we still find that it has a relaxing vibe. Many locals just come here, sit in a chair, grab a sandwich or read a book.

    We also saw some local youngsters playing football in a corner of the park one evening.

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Jardin des Tuileries

    by spidermiss Updated Nov 29, 2010

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    Jardin des Tuileries (In November 2009)
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    One of Paris' main parks links from the Louvre to Place de la Concorde. The grounds were originally part of the Palais des Tuileries that were burnt down during the French Revolution Years in the late 1700s. The centre point of the gardens is a pool where people can relax and people watch.

    At one end of the park there is the Arc du Triomphe du Carrousel and at the other end there are two musuems, Galerie National de Jeu de Paume and Musee de l'Orangerie.

    The Passerelle de Soferino, a footbridge, links to the Musee d'Orsay.

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  • Beausoleil's Profile Photo

    Children love to sail boats in the Tuileries

    by Beausoleil Updated Oct 11, 2010

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    Tuileries Gardens, Sailboats
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    The Tuileries Gardens right outside the Louvre are an amazing place for children. There is a large fountain and you can rent small sailboats your child can sail in the fountain. It's a great way for the kids to play and parents to sit in a nearby chair and relax for a while.

    In summer there is a carnival set up in the Tuileries with Ferris Wheel, Merry-Go-Round (Carousel) and other rides. They have stands where you can get snacks and there are always art exhibits. It's just a great place for the entire family.

    Check the view from Place du Carrousel. Facing away from the Louvre, you look down the main path of the Tuileries to the Place de la Concorde with the Egyptian Obelisk and on down the Champs Elysées to the Arc du Triomphe . . . all at the same time!

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  • DEBBBEDB's Profile Photo

    Sailing Boats

    by DEBBBEDB Written Jan 8, 2010

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    We walked back in the direction of the Louvre. On the way, we saw children sailing boats in one of the fountains. The kids rented a boat for 30 min. and sailed it back and forth across the fountain. They had a great time (made up for a boring museum, IMHO).

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  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel

    by von.otter Updated Apr 14, 2009

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    Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, Paris, July 2008
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    “A man does not have himself killed for a half-pence a day or for a petty distinction. You must speak to the soul in order to electrify him.” — Napoleon (1769-1821)

    And speak he did. Napoleon promised his soldiers of la Grande Armée that they would march into Pairs under triumphal arches following their victories of 1805. To fulfill that promise, Napoleon commissioned Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel. Located on the Place du Carrousel, just west of the Louvre, the arch was built between 1806 and 1808. It is modeled on Ancient Rome’s Arch of Septimius Severus in the Roman Forum.

    Originally, the arch was topped by the horses from Saint Mark’s Cathedral in Venice, plundered by Napoleon; but these were returned to Venice in 1815. A quadriga replaced them (see photo #3). This sculpture grouping depicts Peace riding in a triumphal chariot, the four horses led by gilded Victories on either side. The 1828 composition commemorates the Restoration of France’s Bourbon kings following Napoleon’s defeat and exile.

    The center arch, 21 feet high and 9 feet wide, is flanked by two smaller ones, each 15 feet high and 9 feet wide. Around its exterior are eight, rose-colored marble Corinthian columns, each topped by a soldier of la Grande Armée. In the attic between the soldiers, bas-reliefs depict, among other allegories, Wisdom and Strength holding the arms of the Kingdom of Italy, accompanied by Prudence and Victory (see photo #4).

    Napoleon’s diplomatic and military victories of 1805 are commemorated by bas-reliefs in rose marble; these include the Surrender of Ulm (see photo #5).

    The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel stands at the easternmost end of the Axe historique, the Grand Historic Axis of Paris, a 5.5-mile long route through the central and western parts of the city. The Axis includes the Obélisque de Luxor, in the Place de la Concorde; the Avénue des Champs-Élysées; the Arc de Triomphe de l’Etoile; and it ends at the Grande Arche de la Defense. The Axis begins and ends with an arch, and one at its center; Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel is the smallest of the three.

    The square where the Arc stands takes its name, “carrousel” meaning “little war,” from the practice of using this area to stage military pageants, drills, and contests for the delight of the king’s Court and his subjects.

    One very famous carrousel was held in June 1662 at the command of Louis XIV. This dazzling extravaganza celebrated the birth of Louis’s son, Louis, le Grand Dauphin, heir to the throne. The king, male members of the royal family, the aristocracy, and knights, all costumed in glittering regalia, performed feats of horsemanship, accompanied by music and song.

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  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo

    Ride Ferris Wheel at Jardin du Tuileries - summer

    by jumpingnorman Updated Feb 2, 2009

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    After visiting Louvre - Jardin du Tuileries, Paris
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    This is the very first park I saw in Paris – the Jardin du Tuileries.

    It is just across the Louvre and so I walked to it and rested on a wrought-iron chair, watching a group of school kids being shown around by their teacher. The trees followed an organized French design with very straight paths to walk on.

    There are two entrances – one on rue de Rivoli and the other at place de la Concorde.

    I have also read that during the summer, a ferris wheel is placed here! Too bad it was not there since that would have been a nice ride. But there were perennial outdoor cafés near the garden where you can have a good snack.

    Quai de Tuileries, 1er
    Metro: Concorde or Tuileries

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Jardin des Tuileries

    by Dabs Updated Dec 28, 2008

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    Jardin des Tuileries
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    On a steamy hot August afternoon after traipsing around Versailles, we headed back to Paris and stopped by the Jardin des Tuileries for a nice rest in the shade after wading through the temporary carnival along rue de Rivoli. The Jardin des Tuileries is a large garden on the Seine River located in between the Place de la Concorde and the Louvre. It's a very formal French garden, structured with statues, trees set in a row, fountains and gravel pathways.

    The gardens were designed by Louis XIV's gardener, Le Notre, who also designed the formal gardens at Versailles. The accompanying Palais des Tuileries, where Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were housed after leaving Versailles during the French Revolution, was burned to the ground in 1871 by Napoleon and was never rebuilt.

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  • cinthya_in_victoria's Profile Photo

    Jardin des Tuileries

    by cinthya_in_victoria Written Dec 24, 2008

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    This beautiful park is located between the Concorde and Louvre. I wanted to stay there to pic nic, to read a book or just to listen to music so bad! I envy Parisiens for having such a beautiful park; very colorful and with great architecture around it. I couldn't help singing 'La vie en rose' while walking on it hehe! Facing Louvre, you will find the Arc du Carrousel.

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  • Rupanworld's Profile Photo

    Jardin des Tuileries

    by Rupanworld Written Sep 29, 2008

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    One of the most beautifully designed gardens in the city of Paris. The Tuileries garden was started by Catherine de Medici and designed by Andre le Nôtre originally as a royal pleasure garden with fruits and flowers. Later on changes were made and it was opened to the public. The Rue the Rivoli starting from it connects it to the Arc de Triomphe and La Defense. It was built on the site of a tile-works (tuileries) inside the old walled city on the bank of river Seine. Even further walk down the jardin leads one to the famous Louvre museum.

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  • Paris92's Profile Photo

    Tuileries Gardens

    by Paris92 Written Apr 13, 2008

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    I always know when someone has been to the Tuileries by the residue of white pebbles on their shoes. For me, the time to go here is dusk when the fading sun turns the pebbles a shade of light lavender and all you can here are the faint murmurs of early evening conversations and the crunch, crunch, crunch of the pebbles underneath the feet of people taking an early-evening stroll. Almost every time I return, I find myself here on the first night, sitting in one of the stiff, green chairs, feet propped up on the lip of fountain, just taking in that I am back.

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  • maestrousmc's Profile Photo

    Take a breather

    by maestrousmc Written Mar 16, 2008

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    In an area where your euro might not go as far as you'd like, this landmark offers a free site in which to take a leisurely stroll, take photographs and enjoy the scenery. Located amidst the Louvre, le jardin offers an escape from what could be a crowded museum. As you walk east (at least when I was there) toward the Arc, you will find street food vendors. Marvelous sculptures are dispersed throughout this park awaiting to be immortalized through your photos.

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  • parismumsie's Profile Photo

    A Perfect Way to Spend an Afternoon in Paris

    by parismumsie Updated Feb 8, 2008

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    Two Chairs and a Fountain
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    We visited in March 2007, when the trees were bare. It is fascinating to see how the trees are pruned and planted in straight rows. The sculpture in the gardens is amazing. My 5 year old graddaughter had the playground and carrousel all to herself. The outdoor cafe has a menu like no "concession stand" you will find in America. A perfect place for a glass of wine or hot chocolat on a chilly March day. This is a grand place for children. I believe that when it is warmer children sail boats in the fountain. When I return , I plan to drink my glass of wine in one of those lovely chairs around the fountain. Aaahhh!

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  • parismumsie's Profile Photo

    Sculpture for Everyone!

    by parismumsie Updated Jan 22, 2008

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    L'Ami de personne
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    The gardens themselves are so lovely. Even in March there were workers of all kinds weeding, hoeing, trimming. Oh, the French love to trim and prune! But we were amazed at the how many unusual and beautiful sculptures are found there. There is a style or period for every art lover here. The photograph of my granddaughter with the "troll - like " sculpture has taken me 9 months of research to find the title and the name of the sculptor. I even tried the National Gallery of Art on a recent visit in November. All they were willing to do was a Google search. Hmmm.

    Well about a month ago I found it! It is a bronze by Eric Dietman, a Swedish sculptor. It is called "L'Ami de personne". It means "Nobody's Friend".
    We thought the"troll" looked very friendly with his outstretched hand that Eva used as a slide. The little metal chair planted in front of him was too inviting to pass up. This particular sculpture really made our day!

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Comments (1)

  • gwened's Profile Photo
    May 2, 2013 at 12:24 PM

    14 millions folks a year past by here and the toll is rising, so the city now needs 15M€ to renovated the gardens as the dust and pollution is taking its toll on it....please be gentle on the gardens. Thanks

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