Jardin des Tuileries, Paris

4.5 out of 5 stars 91 Reviews

Place du Louvre

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  • Jardin des Tuileries (In April 2009)
    Jardin des Tuileries (In April 2009)
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    Here is a table just for you!
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    Jardin de Tuileries
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  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    Tuileries Gardens

    by marielexoteria Updated Oct 9, 2007

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    The entrance of the Tuileries Gardens faces Place de la Concorde and it's one of the places where you can just sit and take a break from all the walking in Paris and at the same time admire the beauty in green and other colors that this park has to offer. Inside you can visit the Musée de l'Orangérie and the Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Palme.

    Entrance Fountain Flower arrangement
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    A walk in the park

    by penumbra Written Aug 29, 2007

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    This is a beautiful park between the Louvre and Place de la Concorde. The central pathway is in line with the Champs Élysées. There are sculptures to admire as well as the greenery of the park. Walking along, one can’t help but envy the exclusive apartments that look out over the park.

    A view on the park In line with the Champs ��lys��es Fountain in the park
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    The Rewards of A Queen's Imagination

    by CALSF Updated Jul 31, 2007

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    My favorite Parisian park has to be the Luxembourg Gardens which was actually the property of Queen Catherine de Medici. I would say that this is my second favorite Parisian park. Another property of hers was the Palais des Tuileries which burned to the ground in 1871 and was never rebuilt.

    However, the grounds-or the gardens-remain. And this is known today as the Jardins des Tuileries. During Catherine de Medici's reign she had the gardens designed to her specifications. It was Le Notre, the landscaper of many famous gardens (including the gardens at Versailles), who redesigned the gardens into what we see today.

    It's got the typical gravel pathways, statues, lots of beautiful flowerbeds lining the pathways, fountains, and ponds. Surrounding the ponds are the typical green metal chairs that are so handy for taking leisurly breaks from walking. During nice weather the chairs are occupied by the sun-loving Parisians. So do take a seat when one becomes available during a sunny day to contemplate all the beauty that surrounds you.

    The Tuileries Gardens is a must-see for me as it's in a most scenic location. One entrance faces the Place de La Concorde and the Champs Elysees while another entrance faces Rue de Rivoli. From St. Germain des Pres walking along the Seine you cross the Pont Royal onto the Ave. du General Lemonnier with the gardens parallel to you. Looking back you will see the Musee d' Orsay with its huge clock and to your right, the Musee de Louvre. And way in the distance to your left is the Place de La Concorde entrance facing the Champs Elysees.

    It is because of all of these wonderful perspectives I love these gardens in addition to its own beauty.

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    Jardin des Tuileries

    by davequ Updated Jul 8, 2007

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    One of my favorite walks in Paris is through the Tuileries
    My luck with Paris weather is unexplainable & beyond description, and this time I got a chance to capture it.

    I have a walk through the Tuileries from Louvre to Place de la Concorde in my Tuileries Walk travelogue below, if you would like to take a walk with me and you don't mind getting some of the fine, white dust of the Tuileries on your walking shoes:

    Tuileries walk

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    Jardin des Tuileries

    by MM212 Written Jun 27, 2007

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    Commissioned by Catherine de Médicis in the 16th century, Jardin des Tuileries was the garden for her residence, Palais des Tuileries. The garden and palace were created on a land that had been a quarry for tiles, hence the name. The demolition of the Palais des Tuileries after the fire of 1870 opened the garden to the courtyard of the Louvre, which by then had absorbed Palais des Tuileries. Today, Jardin des Tuileries is one of the largest parks in the inner city of Paris, bordered by la Seine, place de la Concorde and rue de Rivoli. It also contains la Galerie du Jeu de Paume (contemporary art museum) and Musée de l'Orangerie (impressionist and post-impressionist paintings).

    Jardin des Tuileries - Oct 2008 Entrance at Place de la Concorde Mus��e de l'Orangerie Autumn foliage in Oct 2008
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    From one Arc to the other

    by Jefie Updated May 12, 2007

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    Le Jardin des Tuileries was created in 1564 and it extends from the Louvre to the Champs Elysees, so it is possible to see the Arc du Carrousel at one end, and the Arc du Triomphe at the other - the two are located on what is known as the "Historic Axis" and are said to be directly in line, but I couldn't find any proof of that. The Tuileries are a French garden (jardin a la francaise) and it was designed by Louis XIV's favorite gardener at the time when the Royal family lived at the Louvre. Nowadays, Parisians and visitors alike enjoy sitting by the pond or on a park bench under the beautiful elm trees, or walk around the garden to admire its beautiful sculptures. Just don't expect too much grass as there is about as much space to walk as there is to sit down, and don't expect it to be quiet as there is a constant flow of people walking towards the Louvre.

    Every Sunday at 3:30 pm from March to December, free guided tours are offered that describe the history of the garden as well as some of its most interesting facts and anecdotes. The tours last 1 hour and depart from the Arc du Carrousel (no reservation required).

    Le grand bassin (great pond), at les Tuileries People walking in the Tuileries garden
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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    L'Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel

    by hquittner Written Jan 6, 2007

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    The Arc du Carrousel (jousting yard) is a clever take on the Arch of Septimus Severus in Rome. It has 8 spectacular pink marble columns derived from another old chateau and it served 2 purposes: as a gateway into the Tuilleries Palace and as a base for the 4 gilt bronze horses from San Marco in Venice, which Napoleon claimed as spoils. The Arc was built from 1806-8. They were returned of course (in1815). In 1828 a quadriga was installed on top bearing the Goddess of Peace. As expected the Arch is decorated with sculpted bas-reliefs of symbols of Napoleon's military success. The Palace was destroyed in the 1871 Revolution. A bit further West the Garden of the Carrousel exists which is now continuous with the Tuilleries Gardens since the motor access to the Pont Royal is now a tunnel. These changes have made this the most spectular vista in Paris.

    Arc du Carrousel (front (Louvre ) Face (look West) Back of Arc Looking East (toward Louvre) Under the Arch carving Close-up of military spoils-symbols The Quadriga
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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    Splurge and Have a Real Picnic!

    by hquittner Written Jan 6, 2007

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    If you plan correctly you can time a walk through Paris past the Madelaine and the Place de la Concorde such that you will arrive at the Tuilleries in time for your picnic lunch. There are plenty of benches around the Octagonal Basin. First stop behind the Madelaine at Fouchon. the most elegant purveyor of eating delicacies. Buy some fois gras and a suitable bread (be sure to bring along a knife and a corkscrew) and maybe some cheese. Continue around the church and see a wine shop (try Lavinia on bd. de la Madelaine) and buy a bargain price one. Ca suffice. Enter the Tuilleries by its pretty gates noting the winged horses (Coysevox 1702) of Mercury (on your rt) and Fame (on your lt). Procede onto the terrace and down to the basin. Sit down and relax. Eat. The statues around the basin are by name artists. You can look them up in a guide if you wish. Note the two buildings on the grounds . The one on the river side is the Orangerie. The other is the Jeu de Paume. When we first travelled to Paris, the Impressionists were hung here. It was crowded! We knew nothing about art then and thought that was all of them. Several thousand later and a Musee d'Orsay to house those first ones along with the ones in the basment, we know better. We have never been back to the Tennis Court (it has been closed until recently and has now proper lighting). The Orangerie we have visited in depth.

    Gates from Pl.de la Concorde to Tuilleries Winged Horse (Fame) Winged Horse (Mercury) Benches around and ducks in the octagonal basin A statue by a famous sculptor
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    The Triumphal Vista

    by hquittner Written Jan 6, 2007

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    If one arrived for the first time in Paris blindfolded and were to open one eyes on the curb at the Pl. du Carrousel, with the Pei pyramids behind, that first sight (all 360 degrees) would describe Paris. If you would now walk up the Arc you can see in a line through its arch the obelisk of the Pl. de la Concorde, the Arc du Triomphe and La Defense, the last a tad off center.The gardens of the Carrousel and Tuilleries are now continuous since a tunnel has removed the traffic to the Pont Royal from sight. This magnificent vista was not planned, it just evolved and the French guiltily keep periodically re-erecting a Ferris Wheel to disturb it to give riders still another aerial view of this enchanting almost low-rise city. (I wonder who gets the money?). Beyond the Arch (heading West) is a broad sandy-gravel walkway with formal gardens and terraces beyond that stretch to the Pl.Concorde. First a round basin diverts the path. Here in nice weather children and parents can rent small sailboats to float. The gardens contain numerous statues and urns , antique copies and maybe real works by Maillol. As everywhere in Europe, these are fine pigeon perches. Continuing onward one reaches an octagonal basin with terraces beyond and a gate leading to the Place de la Concorde. There is more to see here but it is best done with a picnic lunch. (See my next Tip.)

    The Grand Vista (enlarge it please) The Round Basin (without boats in November) A Rear View of the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel Statue of Child-Care(?) with Pigeon Urns and Statuary in Garden (Nov.)
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  • sim1's Profile Photo

    Jardin des Tuileries

    by sim1 Updated Nov 18, 2006

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    I am following the "Axe historique" (also called Voie Triomphale / Triumphal Way) to the west and immediately end up in another famous place in Paris: the "Jardin des Tuileries". This park is a wonderful green oasis, located in between the Louvre, with its Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, and the impressive "Place de la Concorde". To the south you have the Seine and on the north side is one of Paris's most famous streets: the "Rue de Rivoli". Being surrounded by so many major attractions of Paris, it is not really a surprise that this park is very popular. It's the perfect place to relax and enjoy the sunshine.

    Probably your feet are tired of walking so much around in Paris and they absolutely need a rest. Or you are taken by all the art in the Louvre and a nice and quiet moment in the park is the best way to let all the impressions of the day sink in. Whatever the reason might be, it is a park that does seem to draw in the crowds.

    The gardens are a bit predictable with their formal style from the 17th century and as usual with a formal styled garden from that time, you can see quite a few statues here. The Tuileries Garden was designed by landscape architect Andre Le Notre in 1664 and is about 63 acres (25 hectares) in size.

    Jardin des Tuileries Jardin des Tuileries Jardin des Tuileries
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  • tiabunna's Profile Photo

    Don't miss the statues

    by tiabunna Written Sep 21, 2006

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    You probably also noticed in the previous tip that there are a great many statues in the Tuileries gardens. The style ranges from the very formal and traditional to the modernistic. Wandering around looking at them provides yet another reason to spend some time there.

    Spare a thought for the poor statues though. Placed there for your interest and enjoyment, they need to endure all kinds of weather and all kinds of indignities. No wonder the young statue in the main photo appears to be yelling for the statue with the stick to swat the pigeon! Then there is the modernistic couple in photo 2 with no privacy of any kind. It's tough being a statue!

    Get that pigeon! Modernistic statues, Tuileries Gardens
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  • tiabunna's Profile Photo

    Slow down in the Tuileries Gardens

    by tiabunna Written Sep 21, 2006

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    The Tuileries Gardens provide a delightful breathing space in the middle of Paris, running between the Place de la Concorde (background of main photo) and the Louvre (background of photo 2). At some time during your visit you are almost certain to find yourself passing through them: as you can see from the main photo, most people do! Spare a little more time though, to enjoy the ambience, maybe sit on the lawns and watch the passing parade of other visitors: there are some quiet and very pleasant corners where you can relax with some lunch (photo 3).

    The lawns are manicured, the trees are shady, the hedges are manicured. Overall, it is a delightful area and a great breathing space for both Parisians and visitors.

    Tuileries Gardens toward Pl de la Concorde Tuileries Gardens toward the Louvre Quiet corner of the Tuileries Gardens
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    Arc de Carroussel

    by rcsparty Written Sep 7, 2006

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    The arch was built in 1806 and was topped by horses stolen from St Marks in Venice. The originals have been returned to Italy and the arch is now topped by replacements. The arch marks the beginning of the Jardin as you leave the Louvre. It is modelled after the Arch of Constantine in Rome.

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  • rcsparty's Profile Photo

    Jardin des Tuileries

    by rcsparty Written Sep 7, 2006

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    These gardens link the Louvre with the Place de la Concorde. This is a wonderful walking area as you go from the Louvre towards Champs Elsyees. It contains many ponds and statues, many scultped in the 17th century, as well as the Arc de Carroussel. The original garden was commissioned by Catherine de Medici. It is a great recreation place for kids to enjoy. Make sure to have a seat around the ponds and enjoy the tranquility of the park.

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    The Carrousel Arch

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jul 12, 2006

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    The Carrousel Arch is established in 1808 in honour of victories of Napoleon for solemn entrance of the emperor in the palace of Tuilrie. Columns from a pink and white marble are decorated by the bas-reliefs glorifying victories of the emperor. Four bronze horses which Napoleon ordered to take off the Sainte Mark Cathedral in Venice were installed above the arch. But in 1815 horses were returned to Italy. The Quadriga with allegory of Peace crowns the arch nowadays.

    Paris - The Carrousel Arch Paris - The Carrousel Arch
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Comments (1)

  • gwened's Profile Photo
    May 2, 2013 at 12:24 PM

    14 millions folks a year past by here and the toll is rising, so the city now needs 15M€ to renovated the gardens as the dust and pollution is taking its toll on it....please be gentle on the gardens. Thanks

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