La Sorbonne, Paris

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  • La Sorbonne
    by Maryimelda
  • La Sorbonne
    by Maryimelda
  • La Sorbonne
    by Maryimelda
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    The Sorbonne

    by Maryimelda Written Jun 24, 2013

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    The building known as the Sorbonne stands in the Latin Quarter 5 eme of Paris. It was originally the home of the University of Paris and dates back to the 13th century when it was founded by Robert de Sorbon.

    Today it remains a part of the University of Paris but in fact houses a total of 13 separate colleges. The name Sorbonne today refers only to the building itself not to any of the learning institutions which are located here.

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    Sorbonne universities.

    by breughel Updated May 16, 2011

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    Sorbonne - Observatoire.
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    La Sorbonne is not just one university; there are four universities referring directly to the Sorbonne:

    L’Université Paris 1 "Panthéon-Sorbonne" (ref my tip) teaching political sciences and economics, management, law and human sciences (38.000 students).
    L’Université Paris 3 "Sorbonne Nouvelle" with languages, literature, arts, human and social sciences (17.000 students).
    L’Université Paris IV "Paris Sorbonne" studying classical and modern languages, history, philosophy, human sciences, art, archeology, musicology, etc. (25.000 students).
    L’Université Paris 5 "Paris Descartes" with medical sciences, life sciences, human and social sciences, law, economics and management, science and technology (35.000 students).
    Actually these universities have their headquarters in the building of the Sorbonne but occupy a large number of sites in and around Paris.
    Furthermore the Sorbonne houses the Rectorate of the Academy of Paris and the Chancellery of the Universities of Paris as well as some research institutes.

    There is a Paris 2 university called "Pantheon-Assas" because the main campus is at rue d'Assas. Paris 2 is mainly teaching law.
    Globally Paris has 13 universities.
    The building you see on my photo 1 is the part of the Sorbonne on the rue St Jacques, the former Faculty of Sciences with the Sorbonne observatory.

    It is a nice area to walk: you will see fine architecture (faculty of law - photo 2) and the monumental Pantheon.

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    la Sorbonne

    by MM212 Updated Dec 9, 2010

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    la Sorbonne on a snowy day - Nov 2010
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    Historically, one of the most prestigious universities in the world, la Sorbonne nowadays refers to several Paris-based universities specialising in different fields. The original Collège de Sorbonne was founded by Robert de Sorbon in 1257 as a theological school, at its current location in the Latin Quarter in Paris. It has had a complex history with l'Université de Paris, one of Europe's oldest universities, founded in the 11th century. Over time, different colleges were repeatedly combined and separated, most recently in 1970 when the enormous establishment was split into 13 different universities, only four of which are still referred to as la Sorbonne. The actual Sorbonne campus was completely rebuilt by Cardinal de Richelieu in 1653 who employed the architect, Jacques Lemercier. Further construction occurred in the late 19th century, by the architect Henri-Paul Nénot. The most recognisable structure is the domed Chapelle de la Sorbonne, described herein under a separate tip.

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    Chapelle Sainte-Ursule de la Sorbonne

    by MM212 Updated Dec 8, 2010

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    Chapelle de la Sorbonne, Nov 2010
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    Dedicated to saint Ursula, but more commonly referred to as Chapelle de la Sorbonne, this domed church is the university chapel of la Sorbonne. It was commissioned by Cardinal de Richelieu, who employed the architect, Jacques Lemercier, to rebuild the entire university along with its chapel, as replacements to the original mediaeval structures. On designing the existing chapel, he combined Baroque and Renaissance styles to create a church that resembled many of those in Rome, but it was not completed until 1642, the year the Cardinal died. His funeral took place at the chapel and he was buried within it, in a tomb sculpted by François Girardon. Unfortunately, during the Revolution, both his tomb and the church were badly vandalised, but restored thereafter.

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    Lycée Louis le Grand.

    by breughel Updated Sep 14, 2010

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    Lyc��e Louis-le-Grand

    My photo shows the back of the prestigious Lycée Louis-le-Grand on the left side of the Panthéon. The entrance is rue St Jacques facing the Sorbonne. It is one of the elite secondary schools of France combined with the "classes préparatoires" preparing students for the "concours" competitive examination at the entrance of the "Grandes Ecoles". In France the "Grandes Ecoles" stand on a level which is superior to the universities.
    Grounded in 1563 by the Jesuits the "Collège de Clermont" at the start was named "Collège de Louis le Grand" after king Louis XIV offered his patronage. The college was often in competition with the University of Paris.
    At the Revolution the name was changed to Lycée. The Lycée Louis-le-Grand kept its position as elite establishment. Molière, Voltaire, and Victor Hugo were pupils as well as Georges Pompidou, Valéry Giscard d'Estaing, and Jacques Chirac who became French presidents.

    A thorough renovation of the buildings started in 1995; one can now admire the results.

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    Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne

    by breughel Written Sep 14, 2010

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    Paris is a city with a remarkable architecture; the various buildings of the Sorbonne are an example among many others. It is not possible anymore to have free visits inside but we can take pleasure admiring the outside.
    My picture is taken from the Pantheon square and shows the entrance to the Faculty of Law of the Paris 1 "Panthéon-Sorbonne" university.
    At Paris 1 political sciences and economics, management, law and human sciences are teached to 38.000 students, not just here but on 26 sites in and around Paris.

    Strange for an outsider is the fact this building on my photo is also used by the "Panthéon-Assas" Paris II University which is mainly teaching law to 18.000 students with the main campus rue d'Assas. The building "Faculté de Droit - Panthéon" is evenly divided between the two universities. This resulted from the split of the University of Paris in 1968 after the famous May 68 student revolt.

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    Walk Through the Place & Square Paul-Painleve

    by hquittner Written May 3, 2008

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    The Place (Musee Cluny in Background)

    This little garden area is situated between the northern edge of the Sorbonne and the Musee de Cluny. It is bounded by the rue des Ecoles and the r. Sommerard. There are a few benches on which to rest and lots of flowers. This is one of the suddenly encountered spaces that make walking around Paris so delightful. Surprisingly, it is not overrun by students. Painleve, a PhD. mathematecian, taught at the Sorbonne in the early 1900's and started the first course in aeronautics; some of his work laid the groundwork for concepts on "black holes". He was briefly French prime minister twice during and after WWI and conceived of the Maginot Line. (He talked with Einstein as an equal). I never heard of him before looking it up.

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    La Tour du Clovis

    by hquittner Updated May 3, 2008

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    Tower of Clovis (above the Lycee Henri-IV
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    The Tower of Clovis is a misattribution. Clovis actually founded a basilica on this site in 510, but nothing of it remains. The tower is across the r. Clovis to the right of the Church of St.-Etienne du Mont. The tower is of 1150 and was the campanile of the church in an Abbey devoted to Ste. Genevieve. The buildings were demolished as unneeded during the Revolution which converted the nearby church dedicated to the Saint into a necropolis of the great later named the "Pantheon" (1885). They built the Lycee Henri-IV (1796) over the abbey ruins (which are part of its grounds). The upper 2 Gothic levels of the Tower which we see today were a 15C replacement (below that it is Romanesque, not easily visible). Nearby are the school buildings of the Sorbonne. St. Etienne was built originally as the parish church for the servants of the Abbey and other residents.

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    The Eglise

    by hquittner Updated May 2, 2008

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    West Facade (with Dome not Visible) Details
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    The Chapel of the Sorbonne was designed by Lemercier (1635-42) on commission of Cardinal Richelieu (who is buried inside). The main entrance faces the Place and is 2 order-level Jesuit in style. A more magnificent entrance is on the north and faces a large enclosed courtyard which is the “main campus” of the University. The dome (1641-5) was the fifth one erected in Paris. A pair of fine statues stand at each end of the top of the facade but I cannot find out who they are (protectors?). Entrance into the Chapel is restricted to special exhibition times and for a Mass on the anniversary of Richelieu’s death.

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    See the Interior of the Eglise de la Sorbonne

    by hquittner Written May 1, 2008

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    Nave View Toward Altar
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    The interior of the church can only be seen when there are special cultural events held in it, but it was open regularly when we took these pictures although the light was dim. The interior is elaborate and shows off Le Mercier's first dome. Richelieu's tomb at the inner end of the chancel is a masterpiece of sculpture (by Girardon, 1678, to drawings by LeBrun).

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    See the Sorbonne's Campus (an Inner Court Yard)

    by hquittner Written May 1, 2008

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    The Arcade at the North of the Cour d'Honneur
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    We took these pictures 15 years ago when terrorism and security were unusual terms. We guess you need a student ID or special pass to get in and wander around. The Cour d'Honneur is the school's campus bur outside studying on the steps of the church may no longer be permitted. In the late 19C(?) it was graced by statues of a couple of recent graduates who made good: Pasteur and Hugo. At the north end the court is sealed off by a building like the west wing but with an arcade at ground level. The east wing is a story less in height.

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    See the School's Courtyard and Exterior

    by hquittner Written May 1, 2008

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    North Facade Eglise de la Sorbonne
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    Urban growth is often the destroyer of beautiful suburban universities by limiting territorial expansion and forcing the consumption of picturesque sites within the grounds. Such was the fate of the Sorbonne which also suffered plundering of its fixtures during and after the Revolution. Since the middle of the 19C when it became a state supported school called the "College de France", reconstruction has vastly improved the facility but has done nothing positive to its appearance. This college building stands in the rue des Ecoles. Immediately west across the r. St.-Jacques is an ancient complex of buildings named the "Sorbonne" . In the middle of this complex is the church (part of Richelieu's reconstructions in the 17C). Sticking up over the roof line of the east side is the astronomical observatory (barely visible in our picture). One street further South is the r. Soufflot with the Pantheon. The church faces two ways: one West into the Place de la Sorbonne and the other North into a courtyard within the complex (a "Cour d'Honneur"). Each has a fully developed facade which displays the fine dome of the Church. The West facade is much reproduced but the North one is finer (except for the silly clock) with a portico, pediment and allegorical statues and Le Mercier's first dome standing out above it (1641-45), the fifth such in Paris.

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    The Princeton of Paris?

    by Paris92 Written Apr 13, 2008

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    Making students neurotic since the 1600s

    Do not miss a trip to the Sorbonne. The Harvard of Paris is as beautiful as it is prestigious and is a museum in and of itself. (Actually, there are a lot of people who say the prestige is just myth, but let’s go with it just for fun.) To get in, just say you want to go to the office of foreign students and they’ll let you in. Peek in the ampitheatres (Richelieu is the prettiest one), and if you have the guts, go upstairs and peek in at the stunning library. Be sure to roam around the courtyard and marvel at the gorgeous murals that are everywhere.

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    La Sorbonne

    by spanishguy Written Mar 12, 2008

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    The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganised as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). The university is often referred to as the Sorbonne or La Sorbonne after the collegiate institution (Collège de Sorbonne) founded about 1257 by Robert de Sorbon, but the university as such was older and was never completely centred on the Sorbonne. Of the thirteen current successor universities, the first four have a presence in the historical Sorbonne building, and three include "Sorbonne" in their names.

    While the universities are now essentially independent of each other, and some now fall under the Académie of Creteil or the Académie of Versailles rather than the Académie of Paris, some residual administrative functions of the thirteen universities are formally supervised by a common chancellor, the Rector of the Académie of Paris, with offices in the Sorbonne. As of 2006, the Rector of the Academy of Paris and Chancellor of the Universities of Paris is Maurice Quénet. The Vice-Chancellor of the Universities of Paris is Pierre Gregory [1] [2]. Despite this link, and the historical ties, there is today no University of Paris system that binds the universities at an academic level.

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    Sorbonne University

    by WanderingFinn Written Mar 8, 2008
    By the well-known Sorbonne University

    I guess everyone -no matter a student or not- have at least once heard of the Sorbonne University in Paris. It is one of the most prestigious universities in the world. We also wanted to see it -and take pictures.

    The whole name of the university is "The University of Paris-Sorbonne Paris IV".

    The Sorbonne is a great and noble building and has a long history. In 1253, the Faculty of Theology was recognised, becoming the Faculty of Philosophy and Arts in 1271. Later, at the request of Richelieu, the buildings were re-built. The chapel was built from 1635 to 1653. In 1881 the Sorbonne was decided to be converted into one single building.

    Also from inside Sorbonne is one of a kind. Go and see yourself!

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