Latin Quarter, Paris

4.5 out of 5 stars 96 Reviews

75005 Paris, France

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    Fontaine Saint-Michel
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  • AcornMan's Profile Photo

    Latin Quarter

    by AcornMan Written Apr 28, 2004

    The Latin Quarter got its name because Latin was spoken here, and was in fact the official language until 1793. Together with St. Germain des Pres it makes up my favorite part of the city, with its intricate web of narrow streets and vast selection of quaint shops, cafes, and restaurants.

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    Saint Michel Boulevard

    by DunaKal Updated Mar 20, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This Boulevard is what I loved the most of Paris,it`s so much alive with all the street artist,offering you a Henna tattoo,playing music or painting).
    Many restaurants,cafes from all over the globe(Greek,Middle Eastern,Indian,and even Irish pubs).
    I was pretty amuzed that I forgot to take more pictures,,LOL,,you will find this picture in every saint Michel tip ;-)

    Saint Michel

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    Latin Quarter

    by Dabs Written Jan 7, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Latin Quarter, named for the only language permitted at the university in olden days, is a fun place to hang out. Go and see the Pantheon and the Musee de Cluny and it's wonderful Lady and the Unicorn tapestries then grab a quick and cheap bite to eat on the pedestrian streets near the Cluny Sorbonne metro stop.

    The attached photo is the Place de la Sorbonne, the square we walked thru going to and from our hotel.

    Place de la Sorbonne

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    Abelard, Anyone?

    by mrclay2000 Written Nov 7, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The University of Paris has been around roughly as long as the University of Bologna, reckoned the oldest college in Europe. Even though the present building is short of its sesquicentennial, the Sorbonne remains a prominent landmark across the street from the Musee de Cluny. With an extensive library, a voluptuous history, and a sidekick in the form of a rebuilt church which keeps Richelieu's remains, the Sorbonne is worth a peek by most (but a photo by all, for certain).

    the Sorbonne
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    Institut de France

    by mrclay2000 Updated Nov 5, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    After the Pantheon the grandest dome on the Left Bank probably belongs to the Institut de France, the sizable building facing the Louvre off the Pont des Arts. The building itself has been around for centuries, but apart from its brilliant aspect in nighttime Paris, the Institut comprises (among others) the Academie Francaise (set up by Richelieu), the 40 "immortals" who dictate and judge on the purity of the French language.

    Institut de France after nightfall
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    • Museum Visits

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    Cafés on the Left Bank

    by DrewV Written Aug 5, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Naturally, I don't have any usable pictures of the best part of the Left Bank: the cafés. Instead I'll give you a few lines from the pen of Paul McCartney:

    Café on the Left Bank, ordinary wine
    Touching all the girls with your eyes
    Tiny crowd of Frenchmen round a TV shop
    Watching Charles De Gaulle make a speech

    Dancing after midnight, sprawling to the car
    Continental breakfast in the bar
    English-speaking people drinking German beer
    Talking far too loud for their ears

    Café on the Left Bank, ordinary wine
    Touching all the girls with your eyes

    Dancing after midnight, crawling to the car
    Cocktail waitress winking in the bar
    English-speaking people drinking German beer
    Talking way too loud for their ears

    ("Café on the Left Bank" from London Town by Wings, 1977)

    That's about as good a description as I can give. Only I was drinking Belgian beer primarily. It's actually a good time.

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    The Latin Quarter Walking Tour - 2

    by Tolik Written Jun 12, 2003

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    No 10 at Rue de la Huchette was a hotel in 1795 where Bonaparte lived for several months.
    The little theater at No 23 still produces Eugene Ionesco’s “La Cantarice Chanve” and “La Leçon” premiered here in 1957 (12 - 15€).
    If rue de la Huchette seems a squeeze, look at rue du Chat-qui-Péche (the Fishing Cat street) – the smallest street in Paris (length 20m, and 1.5 m wide).
    Now turn right. Xavier Privas (1863-1927) whose name the street bears, was a popular French songwriter of the 1890s. We rented an apartment here.
    80m down the street, and you reached Rue St-Severin; famous church is just around the corner. Abbot Prévost d’Exiles lived at 12, rue St-Severin (the narrowest building in town) and wrote “Manon Lescaut”, the only one of his 100+ novels remembered today. At No 29, Claude Dubission Hôtel (1736) is a fine example of the Lois XV style.
    Now back to Rue de la Harpe which was an important artery of Roman Lutetia. In medieval times it continued as far as the city gate. The harp of the name is said to come from a 13th C street sign that showed King David playing the harp; this indeed used to be a Jewish enclave with its own synagogue. In the course of its history rue de la Harpe was named several times after its Jewish population like rue de la Juiverie and, indeed, Vicus Reginaldi dicti le Harpeur, King David, of course. Maison Rondet (House of the Red Rose, 1730) at No 35 has abundant decoration of the arches and windows on the entresol level.
    Rue Galande was laid out in 1202 and still features some 16th and 17th C houses; the most picturesque part of the street is between rue Dante and rue Lagrange. Constructed in 1772, rue de Poissy was laid through the gardens of the former Bernardins College (at No 18 – 24) which was founded in 1246 to educate monks. After it was closed down at the Revolution, the building served as a staging point for prisoners condemned as galley slaves. At 12, rue De Bièvre, a statue of St-Michel, slaying the dragon surmounts entrance of the former St-Michel college.

    Rue du Chat-qui-P��che

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    The Latin Quarter Walking Tour - 1

    by Tolik Written Jun 12, 2003

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    This part of the Left Bank was built on the Roman origins – hence Latin. The Romans provided their community with aqueduct stretched 15km/9mi brought water to the public baths, and a network of the paved roads was built. Lutècia’s main (and oldest) street was named St-Jacques (St-James in English, Santiago in Spanish) after the pilgrims who walked along it to Santiago de Compostella. The Romans built Petit Pont, Paris’ 1st bridge, in the 1st century BC and linked rue St-Jacques to the Île de la Cité (current bridge from 1853). Place St-Michel, popular our starting point, decorated with fountain by Gabriel Davioud of Sainte Michel crushing the Dragon (1860). Here begins boulevard St-Michel (or Bull-Mich). The nearby metro entrance is one of the few remaining Hector Guimard Art Noueau originals. The present bridge (Pont Michel, 1857) replaced one dated from 1378. If you walk east along the quai Saint-Michel, you will see Notre-Dame across the river in all her stunning beauty, washed by the rays of a morning sun.
    Rue de la Huchette, which starts here, is one of Paris’ oldest streets, dating back to 1284. Its name means “street of the little through”. The street was already famous in the 17th century for its roasts and for its cutpurses. Rue de la Huchette remained disreputable into the 20th C and in the 1920s boasted 3 brothels, the most famous of which, Le Panier Fleuri, was on the south-eastern corner of rue Xavier-Privas. Rue de la Huchette also has a famous jazz club, le Caveau de la Huchette, at number 5. It was once a meeting place of the Templars of the Rose Croix, complete with an underground passage to the Petit Châtelet dungeons. Then it was taken over in 1772 by the Freemasons, who turned it into a secret lodge and added another passage running under the cloister of Saint-Séverin. During the Revolution the building was requisitioned by the Convention and used as a court of justice and prison.

    Caveau de la Huchette
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    One of most beautiful thing to...

    by jimistador Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    One of most beautiful thing to do in Paris is walk in some 'quartiers', discover new places .
    My favourites walks are

    L´Ile Saint-Louis
    Champs Elysées
    St Germain des prés
    Quartier Latin ( ST Michel)
    Rue Mouffetard (place de la contrescarpe)
    Montmarte
    Pont des arts (with concerts of anonymous artits)

    Paris is very special, each street each 'boulevard' have his story.
    For example in the same street that 'le café des Lettres' you can find The Gainsbourg´s home (a french musician, very good) and the wall of it´s home his full of sentences wrote by his fan. Please take the time to read the sentences.

    Related to:
    • Wine Tasting

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  • Visit Quartier Latin

    by Chantilly18 Written Sep 9, 2002

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Visit Quartier Latin
    This area used to be a place where students live. Now this area has a lot of restaurants and take-aways. They have all sorts of restaurants from Asian to Greek and the food is good too!!! I go there everytime I go to Paris because the atmosphere is so good. I try a different restaurant everytime I go there. The prices are good too. An average price for a menu is probably FF145. That's about $20. I think it's a good deal.

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  • Angel_Dust's Profile Photo

    Le Mont Saint Michel, Normandy...

    by Angel_Dust Written Aug 24, 2002

    1 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Le Mont Saint Michel, Normandy is absolutely incredible.
    It's a church built in shape of a cross, and at night, when the tide rises, it surrounds the place so that nothing can leave or go in. The priest built it because he dreamt that Michel (the archangel) told him to....

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  • lorino's Profile Photo

    You must walk the Latin...

    by lorino Written Aug 24, 2002

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    You must walk the Latin Quarter. I was constantly surprised (pleasantly) by the street performers, musicians and mimes that tend to congregate in this part of Paris known for just that...artists and musicians! Nonetheless, I enjoyed wandering through this part of Paris the most!
    The Latin Quarter has an abundance of street markets, wonderful shopping, great restaurants and cafes, and Bonus! Street entertainers as pictured! Shopping: Rue Mouffetard!!!

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Sorbonne

    by solopes Updated Jan 10, 2013

    Sorbonne is a name forever connected with the movement that in 1968 changed the world, known as the "French May".

    It is a reference in culture, and its influence may be noticed in all the quarter.

    Paris - France
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  • ruki's Profile Photo

    Place for students

    by ruki Updated Dec 20, 2008

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    It is located on the left bank of the Seine around the Sorbonne University. It is a part of Paris full of bistros, restaurants schools and university. Latin Quarter has unique lively atmosphere

    Related to:
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  • baldurontour's Profile Photo

    Latin Quarter

    by baldurontour Written Oct 20, 2007

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Just Walk down the narrow paths and enjoy the flair. The food here is cheaper and absolutely ok. Very recommendabl for low budget food...

    latin Quarter Latin Quarter
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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