Le Marais, Paris

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  • Hôtel d'Albret, May 2014
    Hôtel d'Albret, May 2014
    by MM212
  • Above the door
    Above the door
    by Nemorino
  • Gate and courtyard
    Gate and courtyard
    by Nemorino
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    Museum of Jewish Art and History

    by Nemorino Written Oct 27, 2013

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    Museum entrance
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    This museum in the Marais district is devoted to Jewish artworks and historical artifacts, mainly from France but also from other European countries and from North Africa.

    Unfortunately no photography is allowed inside the museum, but some of the artworks and religious objects can be seen on the museum’s website.

    Except for one alcove on the ground floor, this is not a Holocaust museum. That one alcove is called “To be a Jew in Paris in 1939” and shows photos of Jewish residents of Paris shortly before they were deported and murdered by the Nazis.

    Second photo: The museum is located in an impressive building called the Hôtel de Saint-Aignan, which was built from 1644 to 1650 as a private mansion. It got its name from its second owner, the Duke of Saint-Aignan, who bought the building in 1688.

    Third photo: Looking through the gate and into the courtyard of the museum.

    Fourth photo: This poster at the entrance gives a preview of some of the many artworks that are on display inside.

    Fifth photo: The solemn courtyard.

    Next Paris review from October 2013: Camille Claudel exhibition at the Rodin Museum

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    Hôtel de Sully

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 1, 2013

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    1. H��tel de Sully
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    This is a Hôtel in the old sense of the word, mean a stately and elaborate private residence. It is named after its most famous owner, the first Duke of Sully, who bought it in 1634 and fixed it up as his retirement residence.

    This is now the head office of the Center of National Monuments, and also houses an exhibition hall and a library.

    Second photo: People in the first courtyard of the Hôtel de Sully, coming in from Rue Saint-Antoine. From here you can walk through and come out the back end at Place des Vosges.

    Third photo: Here's what it looks like from the street, Rue Saint-Antoine.

    Fourth photo: Across the street there is a small pastry shop with the marvelous name Aux Désirs de Manon, referring to the heroine of the novel Manon Lescaut by Abbé Prévost (1697-1763) -- a novel which was the inspiration for operas by Auber, Massenet, Puccini and Henze, among others.

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    Fashioned quarter

    by solopes Updated Jan 3, 2013
    Paris - France
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    After several visits to Paris always skipping this quarter, I spent there a full week. It gave me a new image of this trendy area, where many recent investments didn't compromise its history and traditional look.

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    Innocents fountain

    by solopes Updated Jan 3, 2013

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    Paris - France

    Built in the middle of the 16th century, in a former graveyard, this fountain got its name from the church of Innocents, built in memory of the children killed by Herodes.

    Later on, in the 18th century the church was replaced by a market, but the church was moved to the centre of a new square, giving name to it.

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    Église Saint-Paul Saint-Louis

    by MM212 Updated Sep 26, 2012

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    ��glise Saint-Paul Saint-Louis, Sep 2012
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    Commissioned by King Louis XIII in 1627, église Saint-Paul Saint-Louis was originally built for the Jesuits. Its first official name was église Saint-Louis de la maison professe des Jésuites, but later also took on "Saint Paul" after a nearby church dedicated to Saint Paul, which was destroyed in 1796. The church's design was heavily influenced by Italian architecture, but with French touches, and deviates tremendously from typical Gothic churches of Paris. The dome was one of the first in Paris and the façade resembles that of the nearby church of Saint Gervais, which was completed only a decade earlier. In October 2008, église Saint-Paul Saint-Louis stuck out like a sore thumb amid surrounding buildings due to its blackened façade. It had escaped the meticulous cleaning that the rest of Paris had undergone over the past two decades and was a reminder of what all of Paris had been like up to the 1980s. The church subsequently went through the much-needed restoration, and the glorious façade was unveiled in Summer 2012. See the attached photos for before and after.

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    Synagogue des Tournelles

    by MM212 Updated Apr 29, 2012

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    Synagogue des Tournelles, Apr 2010
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    Designed in 1872 by the architect Marcellin-Emmanuel Varcollier, la Synagogue des Tournelles is the second largest synagogue in Paris. It serves the Ashkenazi Jewish community of Paris, many of whom are originally from central and eastern Europe. The architecture, perhaps considered neo-Romanesque, is similar to that of la Grande Synagogue de la Victoire (the largest synagogue in Paris) in the 9th arrondissement. It is named after the street it is on, rue des Tournelles, in the Marais district, right behind Place des Vosges.

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    Hôtel de Sens

    by sim1 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    H��tel de Sens
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    Probably more famous then the church I just mentioned, but certainly not better for me, is the Hôtel de Sens. The only thing I can say about it is that it looks 'different' with the little towers. But it didn't leave me in awe at all.

    Hôtel de Sens is one of the 3 remaining medieval private residences in Paris and it was built between 1475 and 1507. Nowadays it houses Bibliothèque Forney, where you can admire decorative and fine arts, as well as industrial techniques. I haven't been inside, so I can't judge about that. I just can say that the outside is disappointing, and for me not worth making a detour for.

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    Sunday Afternoon at le Marais

    by ForestqueenNYC Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Lined Up For Falafel
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    On Sunday afternoon le Marais is absolutely mobbed with people. There are lots of kosher markets, boulangeries, bookstores, and restaurants and it is also an area where the young trendy designers have set up shop. You will also find lots of nonkosher bars and restaurants as well as museums and theatres.

    I took my Parisian landlady there and she was amazed. Even though her brother-in-law lives in le Marais, she had no idea that on Sundays it was the liveliest place in Paris.

    Check out the website below. It will tell you everything you want to know about le Marais.

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    Hôtel Libéral Bruant

    by MM212 Updated Dec 9, 2010

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    H��tel Lib��ral Bruant, Oct 2008

    One of many hôtels particuliers in le Marais district, Hôtel Libéral Bruant carries the name of the architect who designed l'Hôtel des Invalides, among other structures in Paris. He built this mansion in 1685 as his own residence in a Louis XIV style, with arched windows and four niches containing the busts of Roman emperors. The façade's pediment contains elaborate bas-reliefs of cherubs and vegetal motifs. Over the course of history, the mansion changed hands several times until it was purchased in 1967 by the State and turned into a museum. Unfortunately, the museum shut down a couple of decades later and the Hôtel Libéral Bruant has since been closed.

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    Hôtel de Sully

    by MM212 Updated Nov 25, 2010

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    H��tel de Sully: Spring & Summer (Nov 2010)
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    Considered one of the most beautiful Renaissance-period palaces in Paris (of a Louis XIII style), Hôtel de Sully was completed in 1630. It was built for the compte financier Mesme-Gallet, but only four years later, a former royal financial minister, the Duke of Sully, purchased the property. It retained his name as it continued to be owned by his family for centuries before changing hands a number of times afterwards. When the mansion was partially destroyed in WWII, the government purchased it and restored it to its former glory. The façades of the first courtyard are beautifully decorated, and above the main entrance are two sculptures representing Spring and Summer. The second courtyard contains a separate pavilion, known as l'Orangerie, which gives access to Place des Vosges behind. Nowadays, Hôtel de Sully houses la Caisse nationale des monuments historiques et des sites, an institution responsible for historic sites in France, and the contains a photographic exhibition hall on its ground floor.

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    Église Saint-Merri

    by MM212 Updated Nov 21, 2010

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    Fa��ade of Saint-Merri - Nov 2010
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    Dedicated to the patron saint of the right bank of Paris, Église Saint-Merri is considered one of the city's most beautiful Gothic churches. Saint Merri was a 7th century abbot, originally known as Medericus, who died near the spot where this church was erected. Although it was first built in the 12th century AD, the existing church is from a 16th century reconstruction. Only parts of the lower façade, which is intricately decorated with Gothic sculptures and is facing rue Saint-Martin, are from the original structure. Its small Gothic bell tower, which possesses the oldest church bell in Paris (1331), was originally one floor higher, but the top floor was destroyed in a 19th century fire and was never rebuilt. Although Saint-Merri is a fairly typical French Gothic church, its interior is unusually well lit, especially when the sun shines through the upper Gothic windows. Église Saint-Merri is located in the heart of the Marais district of Paris.

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    Hôtel de Lamoignon

    by MM212 Updated Oct 29, 2010

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    H��tel de Lamoignon, Oct 2008
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    Initially named Hôtel d'Angoulême after its first resident, Diane de France la duchesse d'Angoulême, l'Hôtel de Lamoignon dates from 1589. It took on its current name in 1658 when the president of the French parliament, Chrétien-François de Lamoignon, bought it. Many of his famous contemporaries are known to have been entertained at his mansion, including Madame de Sévigné and Racine. A few additions were made to the mansion in the 17th century by the royal architect, Robert de Cotte, while the portal on rue de Pavée (pictured here) was a 1718 addition. It is said that this house contains one of the most beautiful painted ceilings in Paris. Since the 1960s, l'Hôtel de Lamoignon has housed la Bibliotèque historique de la Ville de Paris, the Historical Library of the City of Paris.

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    le Marais

    by MM212 Updated Oct 29, 2010

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    A street in le Marais, May 2007
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    The marshes that gave le Marais its name were drained long ago in the 10th century. The reclaimed land allowed urban development to gradually develop north of île de la Cité, the heart of Paris. In the 17th to the 19th centuries, when large sections of Paris were torn down to allow for grander urban planning, particularly by Haussmann, le Marais remained neglected and was spared from destruction. Also saved were numerous sumptuous hôtels particuliers, or townhouse palaces, many of which have now been turned into interesting museums. Therefore, it is one of the more charming neighbourhoods in Paris where some of the older architecture and narrow streets have been preserved. In the 19th century, le Marais became home to a large number of eastern European Jews, and in more recent times, the gay community also moved to this area. These two communities still dominate le Marais and live side-by-side, often resulting in an interesting cultural diversity. Le Marais, with its art galleries, falafel sellers, cafés, small museums, bistros, and gay bars is well worth an afternoon in Paris.

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    Synagogue de la rue Pavée

    by MM212 Written Apr 3, 2010

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    Synagogue de la rue Pav��e, Apr 2010
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    Located on rue Pavée in le Marais, this Art Nouveau synagogue was completed in 1915 for orthodox Jewish immigrants from Russia. It was designed by the architect, Hector Guimard, one of the most important Art Nouveau architects of his time. The synagogue stands rather out of place among more traditional French architecture on the narrow rue Pavée. Unfortunately, the Synagogue is not open to visitors.

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    Hôtel d'Albret

    by MM212 Updated Nov 9, 2008

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    H��tel d'Albret, May 2014
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    Located in the heart of the Marais, l'Hôtel d'Albret is one of many old hôtels particuliers in the district. It was built in the middle of the 16th century and underwent changes and expansions as it changed hands in the following centuries. One notable architect who worked on Hôtel d'Albret is François Mansart, who also worked on other nearby mansions such as Hôtel Carnavalet. Today, Hôtel d'Albret houses La Direction des Affaires Culturelles (Ministry of Cultural Affairs) which often hosts concerts and other events, particularly in its courtyard in summer months.

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