Ministry of Culture and Communication, Paris

2 Reviews

182, rue Saint-Honoré - 75001 Paris

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  • Seen through an archway, March 2012
    Seen through an archway, March 2012
    by MM212
  • The modern section, Nov 2010
    The modern section, Nov 2010
    by MM212
  • modern and old, Nov 2010
    modern and old, Nov 2010
    by MM212
  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Ministry of Culture and Communication

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 26, 2013

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1. Ministry of Culture and Communication
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    Unusual metal façade on this building, don't you think? But of course the traditional stone façade is still there, it's just been wrapped in narrow strips of metal.

    Second photo: A closer look at the façade.

    Third photo: A new courtyard at the west side of the building, rue des Bons Enfants.

    Fourth photo: In the windows on the outside of this building there is an exhibit of large posters showing architectural projects in different parts of France which are being supported by the Ministry of Culture and Communication. This one is the Centre Pompidou-Metz, a large new museum which is now under construction in Metz and is scheduled to open in January 2008.

    Fifth photo: Here's another big project, the City of Design in Saint-Etienne.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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    Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication

    by MM212 Updated Nov 28, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Minist��re Culture et Communication, Nov 2010
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    Perhaps not since the construction of Centre Georges Pompidou and la Pyramide du Louvre has the heart of Paris seen such a clash between modern and old. This time it was the Ministry of Culture and Communications, which had plans to relocate its offices to two adjacent buildings, a 1919 Belle-Époque beauty and an ordinary 1960 modern building. In 2006, the ministry employed the architect, Francis Soler, to join the two buildings into a single office space, but he was faced with the impossible task of unifying two completely different styles. He ingeniously wrapped the two edifices with a metallic net in a lace-like, Art Nouveau-inspired design to create a sense of unity and continuity. The effect is quite extraordinary, but leaves open the decades-old debate over whether or not there is room for modern architecture in historic Paris. You be the judge!

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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