Musée d'Orsay, Paris

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  • Kids at Musee D'Orsay-art school-lovely!
    Kids at Musee D'Orsay-art school-lovely!
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    Vue generell(!)-Musee D-Orsay
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    sculpture outside Musee d’Orsay
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Garnier in the Orsay

    by Nemorino Updated Jun 1, 2013

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    1. Cross-section of the Op��ra Garnier
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    At the back end of the ground floor of the Musée d'Orsay there is an interesting exhibit on the building of the "new" (meaning new in the 19th century) opera house which was ordered by the Emperor Napoleon III and designed by the young architect Charles Garnier (1825-1898).

    This model shows a cross-section of the opera building, with its entrance hall, grand staircase, auditorium with crown and the stage and backstage areas. Today this opera house is known as the Opéra Garnier or Palais Garnier, after its architect. It is one of five opera houses currently operating in Paris, the others being the Opéra Bastille, the Théâtre du Châtelet, the Opéra Comique (Salle Favart), and the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées.

    Second photo: L'escalier de l'Opéra, a painting of the Grand Staircase of the then-new opera house, painted around 1980 by Victor Navlet (1819-1886). The French State bought this painting directly from the artist in 1881 and displayed it for six years in the French Embassy in Berlin.

    Third photo: This is the definitive sketch for the ceiling of the opera house, by the painter Jules-Eugène Lenepveu (1819-1898), who proceeded to paint exactly this on the round ceiling of the auditorium. Lenepveu's ceiling paintings are still there, but they are no longer visible because they have been covered since 1964 by the new ceiling paintings of Marc Chagall (1887-1985).

    Fourth photo: Portrait of the architect Charles Garnier, painted in 1868 by Paul Baudry (1828-1886).

    Fifth photo: Under a glass floor there is a model of the opera house and the entire district around it, as it was in the early years of the 20th century.

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    To -loose one leg is unfortuante, Toulouse two is.

    by sourbugger Updated May 17, 2013

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    What's the weather like up there ?
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    I know there must be a joke in there somewhere.

    Anyway, one of the artists who really sums up the Parisien spirit, especailly the bohemian lifestyle of the early part of the 20th century was Toulouse- Lautrec. He lost one leg in an accident at age 12 - and then the other two years later ! This meant his legs stopped growing from then on.

    Such little things (sorry for that heightest comment) didn't stop him enjoying life to the full. He was often to be found in the Moulin Rouge and other such establishments with a large glass of wine in one hand and a sketching pad in the other. Not sure where he would have placed the Parisien hooker - what a clever dick. He would then develop his drawings in the studio the next day.

    His was truely a life given over to wine, women and song - the lucky bastard.

    Several of his painting were re-worked to be used as advertisments for the Moulin rouge, whilst man of his intimate portraits hang in galleries around the world. Some of the best are still to be found in the Musee d'Orsay - don't miss 'em.

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    Dawn of the modern era in painting

    by GentleSpirit Written May 12, 2013

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    Musee d'Orsay interior
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    The Orsay Museum is one of Paris' most famous art museums more than anything else because of its powerful collection of top flight artists from the 1848-1914 period. There is painting, sculpture and decorative arts, though the paintings are so famous and so incredibly good that it would really be quite easy for the others to escape your notice. I, however, was fascinated with the early photography.

    Some of the famous artists whose work is exhibited here are:Delacroix, Monet, Degas, Manet, Gaugin, Toulouse-Lautrec, and Van Gogh.

    You really have to be impressed with the setting of the museum. Though it only operated as a railway station for a relatively short time, (gare d'Orsay) this has to be one of the best examples of recycling an old building into something new and special. The museum retains the cavernous interior of a railway station, but the lighting is fantastic! The Orsay museum opened in 1986.

    Definitely a must see if you like museums or art.
    Note- if you go on the upper floors look out, you will get some amazing views of Paris.

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    Musée d'Orsay

    by Aunt_Bertha Updated May 10, 2013

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    Mus��e d'Orsay

    This museum is one of my favorite museums, not only in Paris but worldwide. However, it's located in Paris and not worldwide, on the left bank of the Seine, in the 7th arondissement. You can only see it when you travel to Paris.

    It's a fascinating art museum located in an exciting building - the former Gare d'Orsay (Orsay Railway Station), built between 1898 and 1900 in the art déco style. Inside you'll first of all notice its impressive clock. Then you'll have the pleasure of admiring paintings, sculptures, furniture, and photography. It accommodates the largest collection of impressionist and post-impressionist masterpieces in the world, for example by famous painters such as Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, Sisley, Gauguin and van Gogh - all of them my favorite painters. You can imagine that I had a field day in this museum!

    Another bit of trivia: the Musée d'Orsay was used as a set for several films, among them "The Trial" by Franz Kafka.

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  • Maryimelda's Profile Photo

    Musee D'Orsay

    by Maryimelda Updated Apr 25, 2013

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    I make no secret of the fact that I am not a big fan of Art Galleries, but in this case I'll make an exception. The drawcard for me was to see the work of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, but I was wonderfully entertained by the collection of sensational works by the more "modern" artists such as Monet, Renoir, Van Gogh, Cezanne and Degas to name but a few.

    The gallery can be located on the left bank of the River Seine and is housed in a century plus old train station.

    Today it can be accessed in many ways, including, bus, metro and RER C, but when I visited the Musee D'Orsay, I chose to arrive on the Batobus as it is one of the eight stops along the Batobus route.

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    Renaissance of a Station

    by goodfish Updated Apr 2, 2013

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    Mus��e d'Orsay - buy tickets on this side
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    Where French artists are concerned, this collection sort of picks up where the Louvre leaves off. Once the site of the Palais d'Orsay, which burned in the Paris Commune of 1871, this lovely, airy Beaux-Arts structure was a rail station and hotel constructed for the Universal Exhibition of 1900; just like the Grand and Petite Palais. It became obsolete in 1930's as its platforms were too short for longer, electrified trains, and served various other purposes until finally closing in the 1970's. Designation as a Historical Monument saved this priceless treasure from the wrecking ball and, after a renovation, the museum opened in 1986.

    Here you'll find paintings, sculpture and other decorative pieces from 1848-1915 by Delacroix, Manet, Degas, Cézanne, Monet, van Gogh, Gauguin, Seurat, Renoir, Rodin and Corot, among many others. Because of its smaller, less-intimidating size, I've heard people say that they enjoyed this one more than the mighty Louvre.

    The best way to obtain current ticket prices, hours, combined museum tickets and such is to visit the website:

    http://www.musee-orsay.fr/en/home.html

    Be Aware: The museum is closed on Mondays, but open into the evenings on Thursdays

    Photography or video filming is strictly forbidden, and please turn your cell phone off upon entry

    Eating and drinking in the galleries is not allowed (there is a cafe on the lower level.)

    The d'Orsay is included in the Paris Museum Pass, and the short line for ticket/pass-holders was on the right side (entrance C) as you face the front of the building. Look for a sign reading "billet coupe-file" or similar.

    Your ticket is also good for reduced entry at the Gustave Moreau museum and Palais Garnier (see website)

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    MUSEE D'ORSAY - STOP 5

    by balhannah Written Mar 7, 2013

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    Musee d'Orsay
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    Stop 5, is the Musee D'Orsay, located in a enormous Railway Station. The Musee d'Orsay was not on our must visit list, so a view from the outside only - another building with plenty of interest!
    If you are interested in sculptures and impressionist paintings, this may be the museum for you!

    This is another building where the Architect had to win a competition to become the builder!. This man was Victor Laloux, who had also designed the railway station in Tours, France. The railway station wasn't a real success, not because of design, because the Trains were being built longer and would no longer fit on the shorter platforms. It closed down and over the years was used as a parking lot, a shooting stand, a theatre location and even as a reception center for prisoners of war.
    Now, it is a Museum, and a very popular one!
    When it opened the museum contained some 2300 paintings, 1500 sculptures and 1000 other objects, since then, the collection has kept on growing.

    The Museum has its own Restaurant and Cafe

    If you wish to visit, it's OPEN FROM....9.30am to 6pm daily, except Mondays
    late night on Thursdays until 9.45pm
    last tickets sold at 5pm (9pm Thursdays)
    museum cleared at 5.30pm (9.15pm Thursdays)
    ADMISSION IN 2013....9 euros

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Musee D'Orsay

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jan 24, 2013

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    Clock inside the D'Orsay
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    Musee d'Orsay is one of my favorite museums here in Paris. It is located in the former Gare d'Orsay train station which was designed by Victor Lalous in 1900 for the Universal Exposition. The museum isn't overwhelming as the Louvre and you can easily visit all the major wings of the museum in just one visit.

    The museum is devoted to mostly works of art produced between 1848 and 1914. There are many beautiful paintings, sculptures, pastels, furniture and art objects from some of the most famous artists of these times like Degas, Renoir, Ache, Latour, Daumir, Courbet, Manet, Gauguin, Pissaro, Toulouse-Lautrec, Klimt Corot, Cezzane and Van Gogh.

    Check out my travelogue for pics of the works found inside d'Orsay.

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Orsay Museum

    by solopes Updated Jan 3, 2013
    Paris - France

    In 1900 a train station was built to the universal exhibition and served as a connection to southwest France until 1939. During the war it was used to the movements of prisoners, and, after the war... Well, why not a museum?

    In 1978 was created the museum, that covers all the western arts from 1848 until WW1, and opened to the public in 1988.

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    Special exhibition "L'IMPRESSIONNISME ET LA MODE".

    by breughel Written Oct 27, 2012

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    Au balcon by Manet.

    There is a new special exhibition "L'IMPRESSIONNISME ET LA MODE", at the Musée d'Orsay from 25 September 2012 till 20 January 2013.
    For most of us Impressionism refers to the representation of the nature and all the landscapes painted by the masters of this school. This exhibition with the contribution of the Musée d'Orsay, the Metropolitan Museum of New York and the Art Institute of Chicago, is centered on the city and the way people were dressed i.e. "la Mode de Paris".
    What is interesting is that Impressionist painters paint women and men elegantly dressed moving on the boulevards, squares of Paris. Nothing in common with the Academic School but some acquaintances with Gainsborough or Van Dyck.

    There is a special ticket for this exhibition (12 €).

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  • zadunajska8's Profile Photo

    Musée d'Orsay

    by zadunajska8 Written Aug 29, 2012

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    Mus��e d'Orsay

    The Musée d'Orsay picks up where the Louvre leaves off and so shows works of art from 1848 to 1914. Despite housing a number of worthy pieces I actually prefer the building to it's contents! The building used to be a mainline railway station built by the Orléans Railway company as it's Paris terminus it fell into disuse in the 20th century and almost got demolished in the 1970s before being saved and transformed into the Musée d'Orsay which opened in 1986.

    Admission is quite steep at €9 per person, but there are concessions (such as 18-25 year olds who are EU citizens get in free) so check the museum website. If you get the Paris museum pass then entry is included in that pass and so goes a long way towards making that worthwhile.

    The museum is open from 9.30 to 6pm, but closed on Mondays. They have late night opening to 9.45pm on Thursdays.

    The museum has a strict "No Photography" policy (which I disapprove of entirely as it makes my camera finger itchy!) and so the clickable links in this review link to the museum website which has information and images of the works.

    Amongst the paintings in the museum's collection are a number of works by William Bouguereau, an artist I had never been aware of before, and a number of these were amongst the highlights of what I saw, in particular Equality Before Death and my very favourite piece in the whole museum, Dante and Virgil which I feel is refreshing as it escapes the often almost formulaic nature of many of the paintings in many galleries and museums.

    In the collection of sculptures are a number of famous works such as The Four Parts of the World and The Dance(very controversial in it's time) by Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux and of course The Gates of Hell by Auguste Rodin.

    But try not to get too engrossed in the exhibited works and instead just look around and upwards at the building. It's truly amazing that this was once a train station. If the Gare du Nord was anything like this it would be a much better place to wait for the train back to London!

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    21st century meets the 19th

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 21, 2012

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    1. The Spring by Ingres (1780-1867)
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    Room number 1 in the Musée d'Orsay, the first room on the right on the ground floor, is called Ingres et l'Ingrisme. As soon as you enter you are confronted with one of his most famous paintings, La Source (The Spring).

    I learned from the museum's website that Ingres started this picture in 1820, but then put it aside and didn't finish it until 1856. Even then he got two of his students to fill in the background, which seems to have been common practice in those days.

    This painting was shown at several exhibitions in the 1850s and 60s, and was widely discussed as a synthesis of the real and the ideal. Is the nude figure a statue or a real person, or both?

    In 1857 the painting was bought by Count Charles-Marie Tanneguy Duchâtel for 25000 francs. In his home the painting was "surrounded by large plants and aquatic flowers so that the nymph of the spring looked even more like a real person."

    If Ingres were alive today I think he would paint pictures of girls taking photos with their digital cameras. (Or riding bicycles or talking on their cell phones.)

    Update: Photography is now forbidden inside the Musée d'Orsay, but it was still allowed when I took these photos in 2008. So my photos are legal, and so are the ones the girls are taking of La Source by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres.

    Second photo: On the top floor of the Musée d'Orsay is the impressionist collection, with astounding numbers of famous and familiar paintings. In room 32 alone there are 42 paintings by Renoir, Monet, Pissarro and Sisley. The one in the photo is Le bassin d'Argenteuil by Claude Monet (1840-1926).

    Third photo: Another famous painting in the same room, also by Monet: one of the eleven pictures that he painted of La gare Saint-Lazare, one of the six big terminus railroad stations in Paris.

    Fourth photo: The Musée d'Orsay also used to be a railroad station, as you can see from this photo that I took from the top of the Tour Seine, the Seine Tower at the back end of the museum.

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    Musee d'Orsay

    by Andraf Updated May 22, 2012

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    Musee d
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    Musee d'Orsay opened in 1986 in a beautiful building which served as a train station until 1960's. The museum is devoted to the period dating from 1848 to 1914 providing a bridge between the classical Louvre and the modern Centre Pompidou. The main attraction of the museum are the Impressionists with numerous paintings by Renoir, Monet, Manet (which is considered to be in a class of his own), Pissarro, Sisley. Included here are also the post-Impressionist Cezanne, Degas and Vincent Van Gogh. I enjoyed my visit to the Orsay a lot. The collection of Impressionist art is amazing and Musee d'Orsay is one attraction of Paris that is well worth a visit.

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    Musée d'Orsay

    by MM212 Updated May 2, 2012

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    Mus��e d Orsay, Apr 2012
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    Inaugurated in 1986, Musée d'Orsay is one of the city's newer museums. It is housed in an impressive, disused railway station (Gare d'Orsay), which was completed in 1900 for l'Exposition Universelle. The museum displays French/European art mainly from 1850 to 1920, and contains an enviable collection of paintings by famous artists of the period, such as Van Gogh, Manet, Cézanne, Monet, etc. Musée d'Orsay is a favourite of many, not only because it contains a beautiful and recognisable collection of art, but also due to its perfect size, less overwhelming than a museum such as the Louvre, but large enough to make you fulfilled after the visit.

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    OK, I FINALLY get van Gogh ...

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Mar 31, 2012

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    Detail of the railway clock at Mus��e d��rsay

    Given my well documented love of railway stations and enjoyment of 'popular' (some would venture 'middlebrow') art, there was never really any doubt that I was going to enjoy the Musée d'Orsay. What I find most bamboozling is why it took me half a lifetime of adult travel (and a couple of dozen visits to Paris) to make it there!

    For fear of stating the obvious, Musée d'Orsay is an art museum that has been established in a beautifully restored railway station on the Left Bank of the Seine and is exclusively devoted to the work of the Impressionists. Because Impressionist art is popular and fairly 'accessible' in its subject matter, the museum is hugely popular with both locals and tourists, and I think that one of the reasons why I've been reluctant to visit before now is that I was simply nervous at the prospect of braving the crowds.

    After a few minutes in Musée d'Orsay, you start to feel like you've been wrapped in a cosy blanket, fuelled by a smug glow of self satisfaction as you realise that you actually recognise a good deal of the art on display. It doesn't matter that you last saw that picture on a calender or a greetings card or a biscuit tin: the point is that it's familiar to you, and you can even distinguish between the Degas and the Monet. Joking aside, I think that this is hugely important, as there's a lot of elitist crap talked about art - often couched in terms that are meant to exclude and intimidate - whereas ultimately what's really important is whether it appeals to you and whether or not you can relate to it.

    Without meaning to trivialise what is an extraordinary collection, wandering around Musée d'Orsay is really like the 'Greatest Hits' compilation of 19th and early 20th century art. The quality of the exhibits is astounding, and however familiar you might be with a painting in reproduction, to see the colour and brushwork up close adds an entirely different dimension to the work. I have always been a sucker for Degas ballerinas and Renoir's poppy strewn cornfields, but I had never begun to understand the appeal of van Gogh until I saw "Starry Night Over The Rhone" up close. NOW I FINALLY GET IT!!!

    I cannot recommend this museum highly enough as one of Paris' absolute 'must sees' - right up there with my all time Parisian favourite, the Musée Rodin. I personally find it preferable to the Louvre because it has a consistent theme and is a manageable size: by contrast, the enormity and vast range of content in the Louvre collection makes me exhausted just to think about it. If you are travelling en famille, it would also be much more accessible to children than the Louvre - indeed, on the day I visited, there were lots of kids who were apparently having a good time.

    Despite my misgivings (and admittedly on a cold, damp Sunday in late February), the queues were not too fearsome, and a welcome characteristic is that the ticket will allow you to leave and re enter the museum on the day that you visit, so that you can take a break from the sensory overload.

    P.S. If you would like the definitive (and yet accessible) guide to Paris' art treasures, you could do no better than to explore the wonderful Paris page developed by brueghel ... so good that I occasionally take a browse for my own cultural edification, even if I don't have a trip to Paris planned!

    Update (October 2011): If you're an art enthusiast, then chances are that you'll also consider visiting the wonderful Rodin museum whilst you're in Paris. If so, bear in mind that it is possible to buy a combined 'passport' for Musee d'Orsay and Musee Rodin, which offers a reduction on the entry fees - see the website below for more details - or just bite the bullet and buy the Paris Museum pass (see my other travel tip).

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