Palais du Luxembourg, Paris

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  • Palais du Luxembourg
    by Maryimelda
  • Palais du Luxembourg
    by Maryimelda
  • Palais du Luxembourg
    by Maryimelda
  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Palais du Luxembourg

    by breughel Updated Jan 28, 2014

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    The palace of Luxembourg is a very beautiful architectural unit and owes its name to the mansion belonging to François of Luxembourg which occupied the site in the 16th century. The estate was bought by Marie de Medici, regent of France.
    Drawing inspiration from the Pitti palace in Florence she had a new palace build by architect Salomon de Brosse.
    Marie de Medici settled there in 1625. She commissioned the large paintings by Rubens that one finds today in the Louvre museum. The right part of the palace was reserved for her whereas the left part was occupied by her son Louis XIII.
    The queen mother did not benefit a long time from her beautiful palace of Luxembourg, in 1631 her son Louis XIII, tired of her interference in the businesses of the State and of her hostility to the Cardinal de Richelieu, throw his mother out following what is called in France the “Day of Dupes”. Marie de Medici was exiled.

    The castle remained in the royal family until the revolution.
    The old mansion called “Petit Luxembourg” became the residence of the president of the French Senate.
    The “Grand Luxembourg” of Marie de Medici became the "Palais du Luxembourg" seat of the French Senate.
    Visits of the Senate are organized for small groups and on reservation. 01.42.34.20 .60

    Palais du Luxembourg. Marie de M��dicis by Rubens. Jardins & Palais du Luxembourg
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    Musée du Luxembourg

    by breughel Updated Apr 11, 2013

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    It is said to be the oldest museum of Europe. Marie de Medici had two galleries of her palace arranged to accommodate the paintings of Rubens dedicated to her glory. The museum becomes public only in 1750. It was the first public museum of painting in France. About hundred exposed paintings came from the Cabinet of the King.
    The public discovered Leonardo da Vinci, Raphaël, Rembrandt, Van Dyck. These paintings were later transferred to Le Louvre.
    In 1818 the galleries of the palace became the Museum of the "alive artists" with works of David, Ingres, Delacroix.
    In 1884 - 1886 the French Senate built the building which shelters the current museum. The Musée du Luxembourg received the Caillebotte legacy with paintings of Picasso, Pissaro, Bonnard, Degas, Gauguin, Renoir. They were exposed here until 1937, when the collections were transferred to the new museum from modern art, today museum of Orsay.

    Since then the museum receives temporary exhibitions, especially of the Italian Renaissance in alternation with modern art.
    Presently there is an exhibition: Chagall "Entre Guerre et Paix" from 21/02 - 21/07/2013.

    Entrance fee 11 €.
    No photos allowed.

    ==========================

    Ce serait le plus ancien musée d'Europe. Marie de Médicis avait fait aménager deux galeries pour accueillir les tableaux de Rubens dédiés à sa gloire mais le musée ne devient public qu'en 1750. C'était le premier musée public de peinture en France.
    La centaine de tableaux exposés provenait alors du Cabinet du Roi.
    Le public découvrait Léonard de Vinci, Raphaël, Rembrandt, Van Dyck. Ces tableaux sont ensuite transférés au Louvre.
    En 1818 les galeries du palais deviennent le Musée des artistes vivants avec des oeuvres de David, Ingres, Delacroix.
    En 1884 - 1886 Le Sénat édifie le bâtiment qui abrite le musée actuel. Il reçoit le legs Caillebotte. Picasso,Pissaro, Bonnard, Degas, Gauguin, Renoir sont exposés jusqu’en 1937, date à laquelle les collections sont transférées au nouveau musée d’art moderne aujourd'hui musée d'Orsay.

    Depuis lors le musée reçoit des expositions temporaires, surtout de la Renaissance italienne en alternance avec l'art moderne.
    Prix d'entrée 11 €.

    Mus��e du Luxembourg - entry.
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    Palais du Luxembourg

    by Diana75 Updated Feb 24, 2006

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    The construction of the palace was commissioned by Marie de Medici, wife of Henri IV, who wanted to have a residence similar to Pitti Palace in Florence, the place where she spent her childhood.

    Being utilized as home to a parliamentary assembly, the Senate and Peer's Chamber, the Palace suffered important modifications during the years, being enlarged and transformed inside.

    The Palace is currently the seat of the French Senate.

    During the summer months, Musee de Luxembourg inside the Palace houses temporary exhibitions.

    Palais du Luxembourg Palais du Luxembourg Palais du Luxembourg Palais du Luxembourg
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    Palais du Luxembourg

    by Maryimelda Written Nov 26, 2013

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    This is one of those buildings which could certainly tell a long and interesting tale if only it could speak. Built in the 17th century for the mother of Louis XIII (Marie de Medicis) and then extended in the 19th century, it is the official address of the French Senate these days. In between the 17th century and the present day, this building has been home to just about everything you can think of.

    Primarily a residence for the aristocracy, the palace has also served among other things, as a museum and a headquarters for the Luftwaffe. Hermann Goering was in residence here during the German Occupation of Paris. Fortunately the building was spared from bombing as the Germans had the sense to surrender when they knew that all hope of victory was gone.

    Appointments can be made to tour the Palace but only in groups. Admission is free.

    Palais du Luxembourg overlooks the equally famous Jardins du Luxembourg in the 6 eme.

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    PALAIS DU LUXEMBOURG

    by balhannah Updated Mar 9, 2013

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    It was in 1611, when Marie de’ Medici [wife of King Henry IV of France, acquired the land and set about having a Palace built that would remind her of her childhood Palace. Unfortunately, the Queen never did see the Palace finished, as she was exiled to Brussels in 1630.

    The Palais du Luxembourg is currently the seat of the French Senate.

    Luxembourg Palace is open to the public, except during the French Senate meeting days.
    OPEN....
    Monday, Friday and Saturday between 10.30 - 2. 30PM
    Group reservations: 01.42.34.20.60 or by email.

    The palace is open for individual visits one Saturday a month - Details and booking at 01.44.54.19.49 or by email

    Contact details:

    Luxembourg Palace Luxembourg Palace Luxembourg Palace Luxembourg Palace
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    VI Arr: Visit Dr Jazz at Jardin du Luxembourg

    by Elisabcn Updated Oct 30, 2009

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    Hello Central give me Doctor Jazz
    He's got what I need, I'll say he has
    When the world goes wrong and I've got the blues
    He's the guy who makes me put on both my dancin' shoes

    If you feel blue follow the song and visit Doctor Jazz at Jardin de Luxembourg. It is very frequent to find jazz bands playing mini concerts on Luxembourg’s arbor. Situated on the VIth arrondissement it was created following Maria de Medici’s request in 1612. It is also the Senate’s garden as you can also find here the Luxembourg Palace, the French Senate’s seat.

    Elle a passé, la jeune fille [...]
    Fontaine avec le buste d’Eugène Delacroix
    Parfum, jeune fille, harmonie...
    Le bonheur passait, il a fui !
    (G. de Nerval Une allée du Luxemburg)

    Definetly my second favourite garden, le Jardin de Luxemburg is the perfect place for people watching. But you can do many more activities there like having a coffee, reading, running, sunbathing, playing chess, tennis . . . or sail your model boat on the lake. It is also an open air museum with 106 statues and interesting temporary exhibitions. In Jardin de Luxembourg it’s impossible to get bored!

    jazz at Luxembourg's Luxembourg Palace open air museum full of sculptures

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    Palais du Luxembourg (Medici Palace)

    by Erin74 Written Apr 13, 2004

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    The Palais du Luxembourg was built for Marie de Medici. After the assassination of her husband, Henri IV, Marie no longer wished to live in the Louvre (the royal palace at the time). She asked an architect to recreate her childhood home (located in Florence) on Paris' Left Bank. She lived in this splendid palace only briefly before being banished to Germany.

    Today, the palace is the home of the French Senate. This has been the function of the property since 1852. You can tour the building the first Sunday of each month, by reservation only.

    Inside the palace, you'll find Rubens paintings adorning the walls of the large gallery. The library features the works of Eugene Delacroix. There are impressive ceiling paintings throughout the building as well.

    The Palais du Luxembourg
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    The Palais de Luxembourg

    by Pieter11 Written Oct 19, 2005

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    The Palais de Luxembourg, Palace of Luxemburg, was designed and built for the famous Maria de Medicis, between 1615 and 1627. The family De Medicis originally comes from Italy, Tuscany. That is the reason why the architect Salomon de Brosse designed a palace in the style of Florence. As decoration lots of paintings of the famous Belgian Pieter-Paul Rubens are hang on the walls, as well as paintings of Eugène Delacroix.

    The purpose of the Palais de Luxembourg has changed a couple of times during its history. After its time as palace it became a prison during the French Revolution. In 1790 the gardens were expanded until the Observatoire, and in 1836 the palace itself was made bigger too. New wings were attached to the building, all in the same looks as the original design. Today the Palace is the House of the Senat of France.

    Of course the nice and famous park around the Palais de Luxembourg is much more famous then the palace it belongs to, but without the building the park wouldn´t be as nice as it is today. It´s the centre of the park, the start of the central pond and the paths that surround it.

    Palais de Luxembourg seen from its park The stylish back of the Palais de Luxembourg
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    Le Pantheon

    by Imbi Written Jan 3, 2003

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    is located to the eastern side of the Luxembourg gardens. Commissioned by Louis XV as a church honoring Sainte-Genevieve in 1764. After the Revolution, it would be designated as a final resting place for the great thinkers of France. In it's crypt can be found Victor Hugo, Voltaire, Rousseau, Emile Zola and the Curies.

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    Vth - The house of the Old Lions

    by Maillekeukeul Written May 3, 2005

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    In France, we have two chambers in our Parliament. One of them is called, like in the US, the "Senate". The building where the sessions take place is situated inside the Gardens of Luxembourg. It is said that Senators are Old Lions, and very few people know exactly who is in there, as they are chosen among Electors and by a college of Electors. And these Electors are not elected according to whom they will vote for !!! Independance, age, wit and discretion seem to be the values to become a french Senator...

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    Palais de Luxembourg

    by rcsparty Written Sep 7, 2006

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    The Palais was originally built buy Maria de Medici at the beginning of the 17th century. Upon her exile by Cardinal Richelieu, the palace remained royal property until the revolution. After the state took over the property, it was used as a prison for some time and now is the meeting place of the French Senate. It is not open to the public, but the surrounding gardens are great for a relaxing break in the sightseeing schedule.

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    Jardin du Luxembourg

    by Inguuna Written Feb 5, 2006

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    It’s worth to visit Luxembourg palace and large gardens, where you can relax and also enjoy history in one. It was also formed in time when the palace was built, and only later for some money opened to publics. Nowadays here come young and old, some to lie in the grass or play some game, the older ones for playing boules or just to sit and watch around.
    There in the park are many statues, and also if you look very careful, you’ll find a copy of Freedom statue. There is also fantastic baroque style fountain dedicated to Maria Medici.

    Fontain in the gardens Jardin du Luxembourg Jardin du Luxembourg
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    Palais du Luxembourg

    by Inguuna Written Feb 5, 2006

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    The palace was built for Henri IV’s wife - the queen Maria Medici. It was planned to be identical to Pitti palace in Florence, so she wanted, having sigh for her fatherland. And after her husband’s death, she moved to live here, but it didn’t last long, she was asked to leave the country. After that the palace was named as Luxembourg palace, as it was in its beginning. During its existence it was as prison and during war here was even located German headquarters. I don’t know if you get in, because we just walked through large gardens and enjoy palace from outside. I liked its reflection in garden’s basin.

    Palais du Luxembourg Palais du Luxembourg
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    Palais du Luxembourg

    by Tom_Fields Written Nov 15, 2008

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    Built in 1631 for King Henry IV's widow Marie de Medici, it was intended to remind her of her home in Florence. It was designed by Salomon de Brosse, and modelled after the Pitti Palace. After the Revolution, it was used as a prison. During World War II, it became the headquarters of the German Air Force (the Luftwaffe). Today, it's home to the French Senate. The building and gardens are exquisitely beautiful. It's the most popular park in the city.

    The gardens are open daily, but to tour the inside requires an appointment, months in advance.

    The Palais du Luxembourg Another view of the palace The gardens More gardens Flowers
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    Jardins du Luxembourg

    by draguza Written Dec 24, 2005

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    The Luxembourg Palace was built for Maria de Medici in the years 1615-1627. The architect Salomon de Brosse, designed it as a Florentine palace because Marie de Medicis liked this style.
    For the decorations and the embellishments, Rubens paintings adorn the walls of the large gallery and the library has the masterpieces of Eugene Delacroix. The uses of the palace have changed multiple times. For example, it was a prison during the Revolution. It currently houses the Senate.
    The gardens of Luxembourg surround the palace. This large park, which has sprawling lawns and abundant flowers, always astonishes its visitors with its harmonious paths, the beauty of its flowers and the shadows under its trees.

    Jardins du Luxembourg Palais du Luxembourg
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