Place de la Concorde, Paris

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Metro 1, 13 : Concorde

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  • Concorde fountain.
    Concorde fountain.
    by breughel
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    Egyptian obelisk
    by kris-t
  • La Grand Roue, Place de la Concorde
    La Grand Roue, Place de la Concorde
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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Bad for photo

    by solopes Updated Jul 9, 2014

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    Paris - France
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    One of the most beautiful places in Paris is also the least photogenic of them all.

    A wide place by the river, flanked by wonderful palaces, no matter from where you look at it, becomes a plantation of cars.

    The geometry, the beautiful gardens, the sights of the several monuments that can be seen, close by, or several kilometers distant, all vanish behind the always rushing lines of cars. Unless you dedicate a special attention to details (and the obelisk invites you to), the square risks to be a discreet passage in your visit.

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    The Place de la Concorde

    by IreneMcKay Written Jun 29, 2014
    Place de la Concorde
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    The Place de la Concorde is the largest public square in Paris. It is located at the eastern end of the Champs-Élysées. The square was designed by Ange-Jacques Gabriel in 1755 and was decorated with statues and fountains. At one time this square held an equestrian statue of King Louis XV. During the French Revolution this statue was torn down. The square was renamed Place de la Révolution and a guillotine was placed in the square. It was here that King Louis XVI was executed on the 21st of January 1793. Queen Marie Antoinette was also beheaded here.

    Our visit was a bit more peaceful; we rode the big wheel here and enjoyed views across Paris.

    The Luxor Obelisk, a 23 metre high Egyptian obelisk, can be found in the centre of this square. This obelisk was originally located at the entrance to the Luxor Temple in Egypt.

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  • gwened's Profile Photo

    Place de la Concorde

    by gwened Written Feb 25, 2014
    Place de la Concorde
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    a wonderful square that has transpassed frontiers and its the focal point of all visitors to Paris. It is not as calm and nice as it seems.

    It was called place Louis XV, when the Kings roams in France, then a revolution came its way and it was change to the place de la revolution, then in 1826 Place Louis XVI, then Place de la Charte in 1830, and finally under the reign of july back in 1848 to Place de la Concorde to our days in order to reconcile the French nation, concordia, peace getting along.

    It was built by the architect Gabriel of king Louis Louis XV,between 1755 and 1775,in a octagonal shape. Here was the execution of king Louis XVI but many many others during the revolution (1119 persons). It has an obelisk in the middle offered to king Charles X by the viceroy of Egypt. The majestic statues makes it one of the most if not the most beautiful square in Paris. It was done to have wonderful perspective of the winning ways to the arc de triomphe and onward to the La Défense. YOu see the grand Louvre and ,also, the Church of the Madeleine and the Palais Bourbon (assemblée nationale or representative house of France).

    Eight statues representing towns of France were sculpture around it,
    Cortot did those of Brest and Rouen, Pradier did Lille and Strasbourg, Petitot ,did Lyon and Marseille, Caillouette did Bordeaux and Nantes. Two fountains inspired by those of St Peter’s of Rome were built between 1835 and 1840 at the center; with that on the north side representing river navigation and that on the south representing sea navigation.

    At each side of the rue Royale you have two imposing buildings, one is the hôtel de la Marine housing the chief of staff of the French Navy, and the other the hôtel de Crillon, one of the palaces of Paris. At the Hotel de Crillon on February 6, 1778 the treaty of friendship and exchanges between the king Louis XVI and the American 13 colonies given rise to the independance of the United States of America took place with the presence of Benjamin Franklin ,representing the USA. There is a plaque telling of this grand event that France recognised the independance of the USA so allowing it to prosper quickly and better (France was a world power at the time even bigger than todays) .
    The obelisk tower in the middle is a gift to France in 1831 by the viceroy and pacha of Egypt. It is as old as 3300 years and weights over 230 tons with 23 meters high ( 76 ft). At the origin this obelisk was at the Temple of Thebes, luxor. The writings on it explains how the obelisk were brought over and set up here.

    Some of the other hotels or mansions around the place de la Concorde today are, hotel de Coislin at No 4 place de la Concorde,Hotel de Plessis-Belliére No 6 and Hotel Cartier No 8. These two last were united in 1901 and its now the Automobile club de France. Hotel d’Aumont at no 10 which after much renovation and decoration its the Hotel de Crillon today, here too was the beginning steps in 1919 to create the League of Nations with US president Wilson (the precursor of the United Nations of today). On the north east angle you have the Hotel de Talleyrand or Hotel de Saint Florentin, today the site of the USA Embassy . At the northwest angle there was a marble stockage that the land was sold and became the Hotel Grimod de la Reyniére, and it today an annex of the US Embassy. The numbers of buildings in the place de la Concorde still use the old numbering system of street first enacted in 1805.

    With the river Seine just next to it, the wonderful pont de la Concorde, and the Jardin des Tuileries as well as the beginning of the Avenue des Champs-Elysées ,in addition to the rue Royale that takes you to the Madeleine, what more can I say, it is essencially eternally a movable feast part in whole of Paris, the city of lover, lights and the world. Hope you have enjoyed the tour.

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  • datapanik's Profile Photo

    Sightseeing around Place de la Concorde

    by datapanik Written Jan 15, 2014

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    The Luxor obelisk, Place de la Concorde
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    The most dangerous thing about Place de la Concorde these days is the constant swirl of the traffic. It was not always so. During the time of the French Revolution it was known as Place de la Révolution and public beheadings on the guillotine were the order of the day.

    The 23 metre high obelisk in the centre of the Place was given to the French by the Egyptian Government in the 19th century. It formerly marked the entrance to the Luxor temple and is 3,300 years old. Not far from the obelisk at the entrance to the Jardins des Tuileries is a giant temporary Ferris wheel, 60 metres high, which I believe will be in place until February.

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Go there in the evening.

    by breughel Updated Dec 22, 2013

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    Concorde at night.
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    On Place de la Concorde you will discover what is the essence of the monumental architecture of the most beautiful city in the world.

    Go there in the evening; the traffic has decreased so that you will arrive healthy at the foot of the up lighted Obelisk. She is not alone to stand out against the sky, somewhat further stands the Tour Eiffel, the Arch du Triomphe; closer to the South the National Assembly and to the North the Hotel Crillon and the church of the Madeleine.
    In the shade of the Tuileries' gardens the outlines of Le Louvre are guessed.
    What a marvel the incomparable perspectives of Paris!
    Furthermore there is nothing as nice on a warm summer night as to refresh near the Fountain of the Seas or the Fountain of the Rivers with their monumental statues. They are very spectacular with coloured lights and the water running at a high rate of flow.

    The Place de la Concorde was less romantic in 1793 when the guillotine stood here; she was called Place de la Révolution. More than 1100 persons were executed here among which King Louis XVI, Queen Marie-Antoinette and many persons of the royal family. Also leaders of the Revolution like Danton and Robespierre were beheaded here.

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    From Place Louis XV to Place de la Révolution.

    by breughel Updated Dec 22, 2013

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    Concorde - Execution of Louis XVI
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    After my visit at the Conciergerie and the cell of Marie-Antoinette I took the way to the Place de la Concorde. The Queen had followed this way to the guillotine on October 16, 1793. It's a long humiliating way she was forced, hands bind in her back, to do in a dirty cart.
    Louis XVI had been brought to the scaffold in a closed coach 10 months before the Queen.

    It's difficult to imagine now standing at Place de la Concorde with all the traffic around what was this Place de la Révolution (named so in 1792) where the guillotine stood in the years 1793-94 of the "Terreur". More than 1100 persons were executed here.

    King Louis XVI on Jan. 21, 1793, Marie-Antoinette on Oct. 16, 1793 and many persons of the royal family. Leaders of the Revolution like Danton and Robespierre were also beheaded here.
    Actually there were more executions (1306) at the place du Trône-Renversé presently Place de la Nation.
    All those who had condemned Marie-Antoinette, the prosecutors Fouqiuer, Hébert followed her on the guillotine and showed much less courage than Marie-Antoinette.
    The Musée Carnavalet has a painting of the execution of Louis XVI (photo 1) and one of the Queen (photo 2).

    Before these dramatic years the Place de la Concorde had been Place Louis XV with an equestrian statue of this king sculpted by Bouchardon. The only part of this bronze statue which subsisted is the right hand now in the musée Carnavalet (photo 3). In that time there was no bridge linking this square with the left bank of the Seine like now.

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  • solopes's Profile Photo

    Wide square

    by solopes Updated Dec 19, 2013

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    Paris - France
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    This large square always gives me the same sensation: breed!

    The river "disappears" and we have the sensation of being in a wider area, surrounded by wonderful buildings, where the inevitable cars seem no more than a detail. (It's hard to explain the sensation, but I tried my best)

    It is impossible to miss it, with the Champs Élisées at one side, the Tuilleries in the other, Madeleine in your back, Seine and Orsai ahead...

    The only odd detail - that Egyptian obelisk in the centre! No, it was not stolen, it was a gift from Egypt, but I would rather see it in Luxor.

    Here, I do prefer the fountains - wonderful.

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    The fountains on a summer night.

    by breughel Updated Aug 27, 2013

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    Concorde - Fountain at night.
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    There is nothing as nice on a warm summer night as to refresh near the Fountain of the Seas or the Fountain of the Rivers. The two fountains (architect J-I. Hittorf), inaugurated in 1840, celebrate the river navigation (northern fountain, with seated figures representing the Rhine and the Rhone and harvests of grapes and corn) and sea transport (southern fountain, with the Mediterranean, the Ocean and fishing). Several artists realized the statues.

    As these statues and decorations were made of cast iron coated with bronze paints in various shades or gilded, they had to undergo many repair and maintenance work. The paintings of the fountains already faded in 1844. Furthermore they were very much damaged during the troubled period of the "Commune". New parts were cast in 1871 and the fountains received a protection against corrosion by electrolytic copper deposit.

    What we see now results from a new and complete restoration made in 2000 and the effect is very colourful especially at night with the lights and the water running with a high rate of flow.
    The fountains are much appreciated as we could see from the huge limousine stopping near the fountain. The people inside were not celebrities but a group of tourists who had won some excursion in Paris.

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  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    Feel small and insignificant next to the obelisk!

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Aug 17, 2013

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    I am probably in the minority, but I actually don't much care for Place de la Concorde. It is such a vast open space that you feel somewhat marooned as you stand at the foot of the obelisk in the middle of what is effectively one gigantic roundabout.

    The obelisk is however a very special thing and is so enormous that it manages to hold its own despite the epic proportions of this vast square. It was originally erected by Rameses II in Luxor, but was part of a pair given to the French by Egypt in the 19th century. Just about every statistic associated with the obelisk is jawdropping: 3,200 years old, 23m high and 250 tonnes in weight.

    The obelisk was installed on the spot where the guillotine used to stand during the Reign of Terror, over which period the square was aptly known as 'Place de la Revolution'. After things calmed down, the square was renamed 'Place de la Concorde' - the 'Square of Peace' - in a gesture of reconciliation.

    The phallic imagery of any obelisk is unescapable and apparently on 1 December 1993, a group of AIDS activists exploited this by encasing the obelisk in a huge pink condom!

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    I BET YOU LIKE TO DRIVE A LAMBO... OR A FERRARI

    by Orkaena Updated Aug 10, 2013
    Lamborghini
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    One day, walking randomly by La Place de la Concorde, suddenly a mirage appeared in front of our eyes, two resplendent red Ferraris and a yellow Lamborghini parked beside the sidewalk coming from Les Jardins des Tuileries side.

    A crowd of people were swirling around these beautiful works of art on wheels murmuring his irrepressible admiration by the unexpected spectacle. After a few minutes we understood the situation, those cars were for rent, and if you take the chance then your adventure starts inexorably with a huge grim guardian seated beside you, of course.

    The tariff? 89 euros for a twenty minutes ride, not too much time for the money, but enough to proudly tell to your friends at your town that you were driving an italian supercar roaring the avenues of Paris.

    Not a minor fact, don't you?

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  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    Learn from Louis - don't lose your head in Paris!

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Jun 7, 2013

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    Following on the unfortunate decapitation theme established by St Denis, literally thousands of people were guillotined in the aftermath of the French Revolution, the most famous of which were Louis XVI and his Queen, Marie Antoinette.

    The guillotine was established in what is now known as Place de la Concorde, but which must have been anything but peaceful when packed with a baying, revolutionary crowd, eager to witness the despatch of their monarch. When you consider that kings of the era were believed to be 'divine right' monarchs - that is, quite literally, God's representative on earth - it must have taken quite a leap in faith and morality to condemn someone with such close connections to the Almighty to execution, and demonstrates the enormous social transition that took place over this turbulent period.

    Louis was executed at a spot close to the classical statue representing the town of Brest (just in front of the Crillon Hotel): later the guillotine was moved to a spot in front of the Tuilleries where the obelisk now stands.

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  • TrendsetterME's Profile Photo

    Place de la Concorde, Paris, France

    by TrendsetterME Written May 26, 2013
    Place de la Concorde, Paris, France
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    At 8 hectares (20 acres), the octagonal Place de la Concorde is the largest square in Paris. It is situated between the Tuileries and the Champs-Elysées.

    In 1763, a large statue of king Louis XV was erected at the site to celebrate the recovery of the king after a serious illness. The square surrounding the statue was created later, in 1772, by the architect Jacques-Ange Gabriel. It was known as the place Louis XV.

    The Concorde Square is the most beautiful place of Paris . With a surface of 84.000 square meters , the place offers a superb sight of the avenue of the Champs-Elysées in all its length and the Arch of Triumph, on a side, the Louvre and Gardens of Tuileries , on the other side.

    Twin buildings with the fine colonnades were built on the side of the place, the Hotel of the Navy , sits of the State Major of the French Navy, and the Hotel of Crillon , one of the most luxurious and sought hotels.

    It is in this place that was signed on February 6, 1778 the Treaty of Friendships and Exchanges between King , Louis XVI and the 13 States Independents of America . Benjamin Franklin counted among the signatories representing the United States...

    Today at the place even where the King Louis XVI was guillotined , is an obelisk offered by the Egyptians.Where many people came to see falling down the heads formerly, come much there today to admire the view of the Champs-Elysées... :)

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    Luxor Obelisk

    by GentleSpirit Updated Mar 11, 2013

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    Luxor Obelisk- Place de la Concorde

    The Obelisk originally stood at the entrance to the Luxor temple. The obelisk arrived in France in 1833 and was placed in the center of the Place de la Concorde in 1836. This was a gift to King Charles X by the Viceroy of Egypt, Mehemet Ali.

    The Obelisk is 23 meters (75 feet) high and weighs about 250 metric tons. Considering that it is quite a feat of engineering and planning just to get the obelisk to France in the first place.

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    THE OBELISK

    by balhannah Written Mar 3, 2013

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    Sometimes known as Cleopatra's Needle. What on earth was "this" doing here in the Place de la Concorde?

    Well, it turns out if was a gift by Viceroy of Egypt to Louis Philippe. Paris could have received 3 obelisks as a gift, but decided one was enough, and here it is!
    In the 19th century, it was taken from the temple of Ramses II at Thebes and was installed at the center of the Place de la Concorde. This 23 meters column, was already 3200 years old when it was received in the 19th century.
    Worth having a look at up close as it's covered with hieroglyphs picturing the reign of pharaohs

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    PLACE DE LA CONCORDE

    by balhannah Updated Mar 3, 2013

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    Entrance gates Tuilerie Gardens
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    The Place de la Concorde is the largest square in Paris. It separates the Tuilerie Gardens from the beginning of the Champs Elysees. I arrived here by walking through the Jardins des Tuileries. This is where Jardins des Tuileries ends. Big black and gold gates were open, but at night, these are closed. I found a Kiosk, souvenir stall, hawkers and a type of rickshaw ride, I prefered to walk.
    I found the best place for a photo, was to walk up the top of the Terrace. It isn't that high, but high enough to get some better photos of the Fountain and the square. I could even see the Eiffel tower from here.

    Once upon a time, this octagonal square was bordered by large moats, these have long gone.
    A sad time in history, was In 1792, during the French revolution when the square was renamed the Place de la Revolution. A guillotine was installed at the center of the square and in just a few years, 1119 people were beheaded here, including King Louis XVI, Marie-Antionette.
    No guillotine now, only quite a few tourists!

    Once again, I was on the LesCarsrouge hop on/off Bus which didn't have a stop here, so I had to walk from the Louvre [stop3] to here.
    The L'Open hop on/off Bus does has a stop, much better!

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