St-Germain des Près, Paris

38 Reviews

Metro – St-Germain des Pres – line 4

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  • Tomb, King John II Casimir Vasa
    Tomb, King John II Casimir Vasa
    by goodfish
  • Apse chapel, Église de Saint-Germain-des-Prés
    Apse chapel, Église de...
    by goodfish
  • Nave, Église de Saint-Germain-des-Prés
    Nave, Église de Saint-Germain-des-Prés
    by goodfish
  • no1birdlady's Profile Photo

    Visit Saint Germain Church

    by no1birdlady Written Sep 8, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Saint Germain Church

    We came upon this magnificent church while walking to the river. It was Not on our list of places to visit but it was such a beautiful place, we took the time to go in. It's flamboyant Gothic architecture which was the house of worship for the royal family before the French Revolution. It was built during the 13th to 16th cen. The stained glass windows are beautiful and there was a rather crude wooden statue of St. Peter, fisher of men, that somehow spoke to me. I was well worth the visit. Sometimes these accidental things are some of the more interesting.

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    Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois

    by MM212 Updated Jul 21, 2013

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    Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois, Apr 2012
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    Despite its prominent location facing the back colonnade of the Louvre, Eglise Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois seems to be skipped by most tourists. This is double astonishing given that the church is a jewel of Gothic architecture, expanded and restored repeatedly over the years since its initial construction in the 12th century. Note that the Gothic tower in front of the Church does not belong to it, but rather to the next door Mairie of the 1er arrondissement - the town hall built in a similar Gothic style.

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    Palais Abbatial

    by MM212 Updated Dec 8, 2010

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    Palais Abbatial, Nov 2010
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    Located behind Abbaye Saint-Germain-des-Près, le Palais Abbatial was built in 1586 by Cardinal de Bourbon, the Abbot of Saint-Germain-des-Près. The architect of the palace is thought to be Guillaume de Marchand, whose design is considered a precursor to the Louis XIII style that emerged in France shortly thereafter. Le Palais Abbatial was also the second building in Paris, after Hôtel Scipion, to combine redbrick and stone in its construction. Some modifications occurred later, particularly around 1680 by Guillaume Egon, the Cardinal landgrave of Fürstenberg. His title is eternalised a short block away from the palace, at place Fürstenberg, one of the most charming squares in Paris. It is planted with four large Paulownia trees and is often featured in French films. Le Palais Abbatial is nowadays the headquarters of a couple of religious organisations.

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  • hquittner's Profile Photo

    Walk the St. Germaine Quarter (walk 1)

    by hquittner Updated Jan 28, 2007

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    Rue des Canettes
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    The St. Germaine Quarter stretches from the Fontaine St.-Michel west along the Seineto the Institute de France, the Pont des Arts and the Ecole des Beaux Arts. The area extends to the south up to the Blvd, past the Church and across the Blvd. up to the Luxembourg Gardens comprises most of the area of the 6th Arrondissement. ( This is really "The Left Bank'). It includes the Churches St. Germaine des Pres and St. Sulpice, plus every sort of shop and eatery from ready-to-wear to designer, or creperie to 4* gourmet palace and famous brasseries and cafes. There are lot of inexpensive 2* hotels and better ones. The many colorful residents (and presence of laundromats) make this a good area for long Parisian sojourns. We stayed on the rue des Canettes (as a family group of 5 couples) and could walk to many places and use various Metro stations. We ate in small creperies and at th bar across the street and walked upthe block to the Place St. Sulpice and further to the Luxembourg Gardens. Every side street was interesting. This is the real Paris! Up the r. Tournon was a view of the Luxembourg Palace and the entry to the Hotel de Brancas, now the Institut Francais d'Architecture.

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  • Irato's Profile Photo

    St-Germain des Pres

    by Irato Written Aug 26, 2002

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    This is the oldest church in Paris - the only remain of Benedictine Abbey. It was built in 6th century. Then was destroyed few times by Normans, rebuilt in 11th century and enlarged in 12th to the present size. The oldest part of the church is the east tower. Take a walk around the church – along Rue Cardinale, Rue de l’Echaude or Rue de Furstenberg. You find here some picturesque old houses.

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  • JaumeBCN's Profile Photo

    Saint-Germain-des-Prés is the...

    by JaumeBCN Written Aug 24, 2002

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    Saint-Germain-des-Prés is the literary quarter par excellence, home of the major publishing houses, the Académie Française, bookshops and literary cafés. The churh with the same name has elements dated 1000 years ago.

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  • rexvaughan's Profile Photo

    Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés

    by rexvaughan Written Feb 5, 2013
    Pulpit and altar
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    This church is, as you probably know, the oldest in Paris. It was founded by Childebert, son of Clovis, the first king of France and is dedicated to the saintly Germain who was Bishop of Paris in Childebert’s life. It is located in what, at the time, were flood-prone fields as the “Prés” indicates, being the French word for fields.
    This is the church where the remains of Rene Descartes were moved from Stockholm but, as near as I can tell, there is little, if anything, here. There is what looks like a marble memorial to him between two chapels. It praises his intellect and his contribution to the literature and thought of his time. Some regard him as the father of the enlightenment.
    The church was built, as so many were, to house and honor a holy relic, in this case the stole of St. Vincent, brought from Spain by Childebert in the 6th Century. The abbey became one of the richest in France and a Catholic intellectual center until the French Revolution. There is a lot of interesting statuary and paintings to be seen, one statue of St. Germain and a 13th Century one of the Virgin and Child which has been pieced back together from three stone pieces found in a recent archeological dig nearby.

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    Rue de Buci

    by william_navigator Written Jan 1, 2006

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    Rue de Buci

    In St. Germain visit the daily (except Monday) food market stalls on Rue de Buci. Wander around have a crepe, shop, find a cafe, have a beverage, repeat.

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