Driving, Paris

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  • get under Alexandre III voie express rive gauche
    get under Alexandre III voie express...
    by gwened
  • going on Champs Elisées
    going on Champs Elisées
    by gwened
  • going on to La Defense
    going on to La Defense
    by gwened
  • on 2 wheels & on a Vespa

    by xavier92 Written Feb 11, 2014

    Why not to try a Vespa tour of Paris ? With a guide and then by our own, it is a very pleasant way to discover Paris. Especially when you have a motorcycle license. A company called "Paris By Scooter" propose this original way to move and see Paris. (parisbyscooter.com)

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    Get a tour on 2CV small cars

    by gwened Written Feb 1, 2014

    A unique trendy nice way to see Paris, is to get a ride in a 2CV twohorsepower cars from older days, driven by expert drivers who give you a tour of the city.

    I spoked with folks who are doing this and the acceptance is gaining momentum, I drive there so I know is doable, and when you are visiting and have someone else driving it is fantastic right?

    http://www.4roues-sous-1parapluie.com/EN/produits/first-ride-in-a-2cv-302.html
    great see the pictures!!!

    and its good for other areas of France too.

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  • gwened's Profile Photo

    Driving in Paris

    by gwened Updated Jul 10, 2013

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    driving on quai  branly to the lady in steel
    4 more images

    The best way to travel I always said is the car. However, when it comes to driving in Paris most if not all yawn at the thought. I have been driving in Paris since 2003, and love it. I went out once and need to get back to home at the time Versailles earlier because the public transport was close, and a fellow expat here told me why not drive over,then no time limit. I did try it and it has been a blessing ever since.

    You have many highways to come into Paris such as the A1 and A3 to the north, A5 and A6 to the south, A4 to the east and A13 and A10 to the west. Then some rules
    •Drive on the right in France
    •It is compulsory to wear a seat belt front and rear (if fitted)
    •Children under 10 years of age must travel in the back seat of a car (if there are back seats), unless there are no seatbelts in the back or if there is no room on the back seat because it's already utilised by other children under 10. Children under 10 must wear a seat belt adapted for children or be strapped into a proper child seat. If a car seat is used in the front seat, it must be forward-facing unless the passenger-side airbag has been turned off
    •Mobile cellular telephones may not be used while driving except with a "handsfree" system
    •It is compulsory to carry a driving licence, car registration papers and insurance documents. These must be the original documents; keep copies separately
    •Third party insurance is compulsory
    •Driving with lights on by day is optional
    •The driver must not have a TV, videogame, DVD or similar within his view
    •The possession, transport and use of speed-camera alert systems, which notify drivers of speed camera locations, is forbidden. This includes satellite navigation systems (SAT NAV, also known as GPS) and Smartphones with this function. The software on these devices must be updated to replace the speed-camera alert function with a “dangerous zones” alert function. This updated function will display bridges, tunnels, schools, hospitals, and traffic problems
    By law, one red warning triangle, one high-visibility waistcoat/vest and a breathalyser kit must be carried in a vehicle. In the event of breakdown the driver must put on the safety jacket before leaving the vehicle, and then place the warning triangle 30 metres from the breakdown to warn approaching traffic
    Pedestrians have priority over cars when crossing a road, provided that they display a clear intention to cross (a step forward or hand gesture)
    the above are some basic rules, just enough.

    Once in the city, always know where the Seine river is rive gauche and rive droite, this will help you tell where you are in tune with the place you want to go. The posting of signs telling you where the major sites and addresses are is very common and good service, you wont be far from a panel telling where to go Chatelet or Concorde or Bastille.

    There is a BP=boulevard periphérique or beltway around the city but inside there are many mini beltways to speed your way such as the voie George Pompidou along the Seine, or ,also, big knonw boulevards such as Magenta, Montparnasse, Champs Elysées, Grenelle, Brune,Massena, Poniatowski, Soult,Davout,Ney, MacDonald, Berthier, amiral Bruix, lannes, the quais along the river Seine, and those in the center boulevard Raspail, Haussmann, Voltaire, etc. knowing these will make your driving easier.

    get a good map or gps if you like, michelin 125000 range are best but also IGN; and just follow the flow; you will hear crazy stories about driving in Paris, but this guy has been to 76 countries, lived in four, and drove all over, first got my driving license n the NJ/NY border in the USA;and believe Paris is a doer.
    Try it and you wont do anything else afterward. Its an adventure of a lifetime lol!! Some photos I have new and see my travelogue on more driving in Paris. Ahh in parking is easy underground ,above ground takes a bit of time but from blvd de la reine along the Seine I always find my spot, the parking chains are vinci ,saemes,
    http://www.saemes.fr/parking/parkings_publics.php
    http://www.parkingsdeparis.com/
    http://www.vincipark.com/vincipark.nsf/en/index.htm

    a bit of history on the boulevard periphérique or beltway of Paris
    What of the boulevard péripherique ,that big circular road that goes around Paris? Yours truly takes it regularly and again just this morning. It came from the idea of protecting Paris from invaders! The decision was taken in 1840 and the idea of Adolphe Thiers was chosen. A new defensive wall attached to fortresses towers was built in four years, it was composed of 94 towers with a lenght of 34 kms. the fortifications took about a strip of 140 meters with a zone of about 250 meters where no construction was allowed all around it! Taken into account villages that eventually were annexed to Paris in 1860 such as La Villette, Vaugirard, Auteuil, Passy, Bercy and Montmartre amongst others.

    After the construction it was decided under Baron Haussmann that the wall was obsolete as the artillery of the times had improved!!! It was a difficult task on what to use of 1400 hectares ! About 3458 acres. The first towers were destroyed in 1919 ,the final concept presented to the municipal govt of Paris calls for the destruction of the towers only but what about the land in between? It was decided to build low income housing or HBM (the equivalent of today’s HLM); the other was given to private investors such as those who built the Cité universitaire de Paris from 1923. After WWII, the ministry of reconstruction tries to improve the highway system in France, it is under this idea that the land became the boulevard péripherique or BP that we see today. Remember speed limit is 80 km per hour Lol!!!!and they have speed radars all over !!!

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  • Beausoleil's Profile Photo

    Should I rent a car in Paris?

    by Beausoleil Written Jul 4, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Paris
    3 more images

    In a word, no. There is no reason to rent a car in Paris. Save yourself the aggravation and expense. Paris has excellent public transportation that is very reasonably priced. Parking is scarce and overpriced.

    We often fly into Paris, spend several days (or more) in the city and then pick up a car when we leave the city so we can enjoy the countryside at our leisure. We made two trips to Paris with a car before we figured this out. The first time we paid nearly as much to park the car (which we did not use) as we paid for our hotel. The second time we managed to find a hotel that paid most of the parking fee at a public lot across the street but we still had to fight traffic in and out of Paris. Then we had a brilliant thought . . . enjoy Paris and then rent the car. We've been doing it ever since.

    Check the web site below for parking in Paris. You can reserve or just look for car parks. Google Maps also will list parking if you type in a hotel address and the word parking. Google Maps

    If you absolutely have to take your car to Paris, be sure your hotel has some sort of parking arrangement. The Hotel Clement in St. Germain is lovely and offers parking under the St. Germain market across the street. Other hotels have similar arrangements but be sure you check before you book. Try not to drive in or out during rush hours because often the traffic is at a standstill.

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    Voiturier

    by Nemorino Updated Feb 19, 2013

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    3 more images

    Here’s a tip for all you rich folks who insist on driving your heart-attack machines into the center of Paris.

    I’m sure you are aware that on-street parking is not an option in Paris. Politicians wanting to be re-elected like to boast about how many parking spaces they have eliminated. They exaggerate, of course – there never were as many parking spaces as they claim to have done away with – but still, your chances of finding a legal on-street parking space within twenty blocks of your restaurant or club are practically zero.

    Like most motorists, you could simply head for the nearest parking garage, hoping it isn’t full (complet is the French word, and they often are), drive in and pay whatever they charge.

    But you wouldn’t want to do that, because it would be undignified and unbefitting your status as a member of the financial elite. Also you never know what sort of riff-raff you might encounter in a parking garage. Some garages even offer free bicycle parking, and you know what sort of disreputable characters ride around the city on bicycles.

    The solution is to look for the sign reading “voiturier” outside your favorite club or restaurant. A “voiturier” is a man (in job advertisements they have to say they are seeking a “voiturier/voiturière”, but you know who will get the job) who will take over your car and park it in some mysterious place for you, and then return it to you promptly and discreetly when you are drunk at the end of the evening, a service known in the English speaking world as “valet car parking”.

    And where does the “voiturier” park your precious vehicle? In the nearest parking garage, perhaps, if he has reserved enough places. But more likely your car will be parked illegally, double or triple parked or on a sidewalk or bicycle lane. The police occasionally ticket these cars, but not often enough to discourage the practice.

    By the way, a drink at the exclusive Esplanade (first photo) costs nearly double the price of the same drink at a normal pub a block or two away.

    Next review: The triumph of cars over people

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    Driving out of Paris

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jan 24, 2013

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    You may drive with a valid U.S. driver's license in France, but for a few dollars, go to the AAA of the US and get an International Driving Permit or attach a French translation to your US driver's license. You must also be at least 18 years old and hold a valid credit card.

    There are several good car hire companies throughout Europe, I would recommend one of the following;

    ADA – 0825 169 169
    Avis – 0820 150 505
    Europcar – 0870 607 500
    Hertz – 0720 903 905

    The speed limit is 50 km/h (30 mph) in the towns, and 90 km/h (55 mph) on the open roads.

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    Driving around Paris

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jan 24, 2013

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    Badri driving us to our hotel

    You can try to be a brave soul and navigate the streets of Paris by driving, but I personally wouldn't do it. But, if you can get a hang of the layout of the streets it isn't that difficult I guess just be careful with the round-abouts. Personally, I would recommend that if you are on a short holiday, skip the driving and use the metro, bus or taxi system.

    Parking in Paris can be quite hellish and so can the traffic, so leave the driving to the Pariesians.

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  • gwened's Profile Photo

    multi sites for transport in Paris area

    by gwened Updated Nov 25, 2012

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    Terminal 2 SNCF and TGV train complex
    3 more images

    yes ratp for multimode metro/RER,and buses,
    www.ratp.fr

    and for the airports
    www.aeroportsdeparis.fr

    and the local trains for the Paris periphery is
    www.transilien.com

    and multimode for the entire ile de France region including transports in Paris is
    http://www.transport-idf.com/frontal?controller=Default

    For parking off the airport this is a new service that can prove useful to avoid the traffic, there is a navette bus that takes you from the airport to the parking and vice versa. The site now is in French but I imagine they will be able to respond in English at least.
    http://www.aero-parc.fr/?gclid=CIDZ8u2o5bMCFUfJtAodEFgAqw

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Autolib’

    by Nemorino Updated Jul 27, 2012

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    Autolib station
    3 more images

    Since the Vélib’ system of spontaneous short-term bicycle rentals has proved to be such a huge success, the city of Paris has started a similar (but smaller) system for car rentals.

    As with the Vélib’ bikes, the Autolib’ cars can be checked out at any time of the day or night from on-street stations throughout Paris (and 46 surrounding towns) and can be returned to any of the stations that has a space available.

    The cars are 100 % electric, so they are silent and cause no local pollution.

    (They might cause pollution somewhere else, depending on how the electricity is made. Since in France a high proportion of electricity is made by nuclear fission, the really serious pollution will be delayed until there is a catastrophe at one of the many atomic energy plants. Of course the French are convinced their atomic energy plants are so perfect that nothing can ever go wrong, but that’s what the Japanese thought, too.)

    Autolib’ was inaugurated on a small scale in December 2011. It is gradually being expanded and is intended at some point to have 3000 cars (Bluecars, they are called) and 6600 recharging stations.

    My first three photos show the Autolib’ station at 47 rue de la Grange aux Belles in the 10th arrondissement, near the St. Louis hospital. This station has four parking spaces with recharging points.

    My fourth photo shows the only Autolib’ car that I have ever seen actually being driven on the streets of Paris. The building in the background is Les Invalides. The slogan on the car reads “Zero noise. Zero pollution.”

    Next review from July 2012: Changes in the traffic rules

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  • gwened's Profile Photo

    private tours of Paris etc

    by gwened Written Jan 26, 2012
    going on Champs Elis��es
    1 more image

    if you want a tour try http://www.aristos-limousine.com/tours.htm
    and this one
    http://paris.conciergerie.com/tour/paris_limousine.php#DetailedInfo

    dont do that here, but work in chic places in Paris where they were call upon.
    Cheers

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  • Adagio1's Profile Photo

    Driving Safely as a Tourist

    by Adagio1 Written Jun 20, 2011

    Self Driving To & From Paris, or almost anywhere,

    Let's say you have leased or rented a car and want a safe trouble free experience. Here are some driving tips that have been accrued over many years of driving in Europe.
    1. Set up your 3 mirrors so that you have a commanding view of vehicles behind you.
    2. Besides being comfortable with your seating in relationship to the brake, clutch and accelerator you should be familiar with the position and operation of the other primary controls- LIGHTS, WIPERS, HANDBRAKE.
    3. Keep at least 4 car lengths from the vehicle in front when on the open road.
    4. Take a break every 2 hours. Eat only light meals or just snack sensibly every 2 hours when covering long distances. Drink at least 3 litres a day of water NO enhanced drinks or alcohol.
    5. Drive within your capabilities and be considerate of the skills of others and let them by safely.
    6. Don't be distracted by in-car conversations especially when negotiating difficult situations
    7. Use a GPS and be familiar with it before you travel if possible, it removes a lot of stress.

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    FRENCH CARS & FUEL CHARGES

    by thinking Updated Apr 4, 2011

    The French are loyal to their own brands.
    Renault is the largest automaker, followed by Peugeot and Citroen, the latter two being part of the same company but with distinct models.Japanese cars are seldom seen in France, even though Renault controls Nissan. American cars are a rarity.

    Citroen makes the C3 Pluriel, which is in the same vein as the Mini or VW Beetle, except this is a modern version of the 2CV (Deux Chevaux), one of the most recognizable French cars of the post-war era. The Pluriel has the same sliding roof, except it's electric, and there is also a convertible. It's a modern car in every way, a two-door with styling that hints at the 2CV.

    Peugeot models have a 7 at the end at the end of their numeric designations. For instance, the 207 is a small in-town runabout and the 607 is a luxury car. Outside, the latter looks a lot like the Acura 3.2 TL. Inside, the 607 is all leather and wood, like other entry-level luxury cars with which it competes.

    60 per cent of new cars sold in France are diesels. Not only do diesel cars get better fuel mileage than gasoline models, but the French government encourages fuel economy by putting heavier licence taxes on bigger engines.

    Diesel fuel also costs a lot less in France -- usually about 35 cents a litre less compared with a litre of gasoline. Even with those price differences, the fuel-efficient French usually spend less in a year on driving than anyone in North America.

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    If you MUST drive in Paris ...

    by shrimp56 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    une petite voiture ;)

    I would recommend the "smart car" -- they can fit into those impossible parking spaces. This one was parked near rue Cler next to Café Marché on rue Chanps de Mars.
    .
    The longest I have ever seen a parking space in Paris stay empty was 45 seconds. This was done as a semi-scientific survey while sitting in a café in the Latin Quarter drinking wine :)

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  • georeiser's Profile Photo

    Cars and tunnels in Paris

    by georeiser Written Jun 29, 2009
    Cars and tunnels in Paris
    1 more image

    Driving car in the streets of Paris is not to easy for strangers. But the city has a tunnel system which makes it easier to drive through the city and the right turn-off in the city. The photos are taken close to Porte de Saint-Claud in Paris.

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  • Manara's Profile Photo

    Travel on a French icon

    by Manara Updated Mar 4, 2009

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    Citroen is nowadays a car maker as any other, but the Citroen cars that circulated until a couple of decades ago were probably the quirkiest cars around (with the exception of the Fiat 500). Among them, the 2cv was certainly the most loved, and a French icon. For many decades it was made in the same design as the first model in 1936. Small but comfortable, with an open top, it was a great favourite, especially in the ‘60s and ‘70s, among the young who wanted to explore the world on four wheels.
    Now it is possible to use this car to explore Paris in a way that is far more interesting than from a bus or a taxi. Especially because the open top allows to play the paparazzi. There is a company called 4 roues sous 1 parapluie (it means “4 wheels under an umbrella”) providing 2cv cars with driver, for a wide choice of tours in Paris or outside. Each car can carry up to 3 passengers, and the fare is calculated per car, so the fare will be lower if you share it with one or two other passenger instead of going alone with your driver.
    The shortest trip lasts 30 minutes, it is from Place de la Concorde along the Champs Elysée to the Etoile, and costs EUR 58 per car. If you take that, you will be able to take pictures of the Madeleine Church, the Petit Palais, the Grand Palais, the Eiffel Tower, Les Invalides and the Arc de Triomphe.

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