Getting Around Paris

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Most Viewed Transportation in Paris

  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Trains - SNCF

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Dec 11, 2014

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    Besides the Fast trains (TGV, Eurostar and Thalys), there still are slower trains serving the suburbs of Paris from 6 different train stations:

    - Gare du Nord, Place Napoléon III,10A
    - Gare de l'Est, Place du 8 Mai 1945,10A
    - Gare de Lyon, 20 Boulevard Diderot,12A
    - Gare d'Austerlitz, Place Valhubert,13A
    - Gare Montparnasse, Place Valhubert,13A
    - Gare Saint Lazare,108, Rue Saint-Lazare;8A

    These trains are operated by the SNCF company (Societe Nationale des Chemins de Fer).

    Real time Public Transportation info on the Paris map.

    SNCF train Gare St. Lazare - Paris SNCF trains
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    Metro

    by Dabs Updated Apr 17, 2014

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    Although I'm sure the buses are a much more scenic way to get around Paris, I am a big fan of the metro. The metro is Paris is quite extensive, the maps are easy to follow, and you know approximately how much time it will take to get you from one place to another. The metro runs from 5:30am to 1am (2 am on Friday, Saturday and bank holidays)

    We tend to walk a lot in Paris so metro passes usually don't make any sense for us. If you get a Mobilis, currently 6.80€ for zone 1-2, you'd have to ride 4 times or more per day to get a good value from it. It looks just like a single ticket but allows you to ride the metro, and also the RER, buses, trams, for the entire day. The Paris Visite comes out to more than 6.80€ per day, even for the 5 day pass, so I'm not sure how that ever would make sense.

    We normally buy a carnet of 10 tickets which cost less than buying 10 single tickets. You can buy one carnet to share with your traveling companion(s) as they are individual tickets. In April 2014 a carnet cost 13.70€ and individual tickets cost 1.70€. We used the metro/RER 5 times on our 1st day and 3 times on the 2nd day so sometimes a Mobilis would make sense and sometimes not. We bought our carnet at Relay, there was a slight upcharge, I think it was 14.70€. I think it was also 14.70€ had I bought it on the Eurostar.

    Individual tickets or the tickets sold in a carnet are good on all of the metro, the Montmartre funicular, the RER in zone 1, RATP buses in Paris and the suburbs (except for lines with special fares: Orlyval, Orlybus or Roissybus ), tramway lines. You can use the same ticket to make any connections that you need within 1 1/2 hours but it looks like you are restricted ie you can transfer from metro line to metro line or metro to RER or bus to bus but not metro line to bus. That part of their website is only in French but you can look at it here.

    Tickets don't expire so next time I don't use my whole carnet they'll come home with me for the next trip.

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    Almost back to England !

    by sourbugger Updated Mar 23, 2014

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    Paris Beauvais may have a rich cultural avionic heritage, but in the modern era it is a little airport servicing four or five low-cost airlines, including Ryanair (of course).

    At least this means that the time you spend in the airport is minimal, and delays are unusual. On the downside the transfers to the centre of Paris are Longer - it is some 80Kms, and if you are delayed at the airport there is precious little to do.

    Airport buses are some 15 Euro One-way and leave 20 mins after each flight arrives - tickets can be booked online.

    The work of gregory Beauvais - i get bored of airp
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  • Martinewezel's Profile Photo

    The Metro, of course

    by Martinewezel Updated Mar 22, 2014

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    The easiest way to visit Paris for a tourist, is to buy a "Paris Visite" card or a "Mobilis" card.
    This card permits to take any subway in Paris during 1 to 5 days.

    As we had to come from outside Paris and had to take an RER train first, we bought a one day Mobilis card, which was the most economic.
    17 euros

    Plans of the Metro are available in all the hotels and in the stations.

    Paris
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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    RER to/from CDG airport

    by Dabs Updated Feb 9, 2014

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    The RER is a convenient and relatively inexpensive way to get to/from CDG airport. As of 1/1/14, the fare is 9.75€ each way, no benefit to buying a round trip ticket. On my last visit to Paris where I needed to use the RER to get to CDG, the ticket machines weren't working at the Luxemborg station but there was a manned booth on the street where I could buy the tickets. From Luxemborg it was 35 minutes or so to get to CDG terminal 2, my guidebook said 45-60 minutes. The trains leave frequently, some have less stops than others so make sure that CDG is marked on the overhead board.

    While this isn't advisable if you are carrying a lot of luggage, if you can manage your luggage up/down stairs and escalators, it is a less expensive alternative to a taxi.

    On a previous trip, we headed back to CDG on New Year's day and the ride was free (I think until noon), don't know if this is normal or not for holidays but it was a nice ending touch to our stay in Paris.

    There are other options including the Roissy Bus, Les Cars Air France bus and regular Paris buses but I've always taken the RER.

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  • gwened's Profile Photo

    Get vaccinated before leaving

    by gwened Written Dec 11, 2013

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    Many questions in the forum as to what vaccines to take when going to forests, exotics places or underdeveloped countries. Have in transportation closest I could think of.

    I leave all that to the folks at Air France vaccination center in Paris. 148 Rue de l'Université, 75007

    You tell them where you are going and they fix you up for good. I always go here on my business trips but also personal depending where I am going, and never had a problem in country coming or going.

    here is a map tells you what is needed
    http://www.vaccinations-airfrance.fr/fiche-sante-voyage-personnalisee

    its in French but easily translated with any online tool, and on site they speak English amongst other languages.

    AF vaccination center in Paris Air France HQ
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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Small Belt Line (Petite Ceinture)

    by Nemorino Updated Sep 21, 2013

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    The Petite Ceinture de Paris (Small Belt of Paris) is a 32 kilometer double tracked railway that was built from 1852 to 1869, encircling Paris just inside the current boundaries of the city. Its original purpose was to transfer freight between the various railroad lines coming into Paris from different directions, but soon it was also used for passenger trains.

    Passenger service on the Petite Ceinture was discontinued in 1934, but the line was still used to transfer freight until the 1990s. Since then it has been more or less abandoned, but most of the tracks still exist and can be seen in various places such as the Parc des Buttes-Chaumont in the 19th arrondissement (first and second photos).

    Parts of the Petite Ceinture can also still be seen in the 13th arrondissement near the Chambord Tower, where part of the park Jardin du Moulin de la Pointe was built on a platform over the old railway.

    Since the Petite Ceinture runs roughly parallel to the new Tramway T-3, there was a long controversy in the 1990s about whether or not the tramway should be built at all. Some people argued that it would be simpler and less expensive to reactivate the Petite Ceinture instead. The automotive lobbies also liked this idea because it would have caused less disruption of motor traffic.

    Reduction of motor traffic was one of the objectives of the tramway project, however, so the tramway eventually won out. Also the tramway stations are closer together and are right where people need them, unlike the old Petite Ceinture stations.

    Next review from July 2012: Parc des Buttes-Chaumont

    Petite Ceinture Petite Ceinture
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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Public Buses

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Aug 2, 2013

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    The Public Buses (Noctambus) are run by the RATP (Régie Autonome des Transports Parisiens), that also runs the Métro and the RER regional trains.

    The advantage of taking the bus is that you see more of the city, but with the present dense traffic this can take some time!

    During the night there are night bus lines in service from:
    -Line 1: Corbeil-Essonnes
    -Line 1.2: Roissy-Airport Charles de Gaulle
    -Line 2: La Verrière Gare
    -Line 3: Melun Gare de Melun
    to major center city locations like:
    -Gare du Nord
    -Châtelet
    -Gare de Lyon
    -Gare Montpernasse

    Night bus website

    RATP bus - Paris RATP bus - Interior - Paris RATP bus - Bus stop departure times - Paris RATP bus - Interior - Paris RATP bus - Paris
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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    Metro - Underground - Tube - Subway

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Aug 2, 2013

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    The Métro is run by the RATP (Régie Autonome des Transports Parisiens), that also runs the RER regional trains and the Paris public buses.

    There are 15 lines, 200+ km of tracks and 390 underground stations.

    Interactive Metro station map

    Metro Sign Paris M��tro Metro entrance/Exit gates - Paris Stalingrad station lookoff - Paris Passy station - Paris
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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    CDG & Orly Airport Buses: Roissybus & Orlybus

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Aug 2, 2013

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    There are 2 Paris-Airport Shuttle buses:

    -Roissybus from Airport Charles de Gaulle to l'Opéra (traveltime 60 minutes at € 10,-- fare)
    -Orlybus from Airport Orly to Denfert-Rochereau (traveltime 30 minutes at € 7.00 fare)

    These two lines are run by the RATP (Régie Autonome des Transports Parisiens), also running the Paris Regional trains, Metro and Bus system.

    Paris Airport bus Roissybus location at the Opera Roissybus at the Opera Roissybus ticket machine at the Opera Roissybus interior
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  • lmkluque's Profile Photo

    Airplane, Train, Car and Le Metro

    by lmkluque Updated Jul 31, 2013

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    TO:I've traveled to Paris by airplane and by train and by car. It just depends on how far and from where you begin your trip to Paris.

    AROUND:

    Le Metro is the best way to reconnoiter Paris. Read in any guide book about where to buy tickets, what type to choose from and any other facts you'll want to know.

    What wasn’t written, is where to stand on the escalators going down to or up from the Metro—to make room for those in a hurry who don’t just stand there.

    The guide books don't tell you to go through the door only after retrieving the ticket!

    The first time in Le Metro—during the Transportation Strike—I got my arm caught in the door, because I rushed through. I didn't know I should retrieve the ticket before going through the doors. Thank God there were at least four inches of rubber on each side of the doors or I’d have been short an arm!

    Any newspaper stand on the street offers a Metro map, buy one, study it and be on your way.

    The Metro stops are named after the famous site or street nearest it.

    Each line is identified by the name of the last stop at each end. You should know the direction you are going by looking at the name of the last stop in that direction.

    I'd never been in a subway before and it was an adventure learning how Le Metro worked.

    Handy Pocket Map at all Magazine Kiosks
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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    The best method of transport

    by Dabs Updated Jun 17, 2013

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    The best method of transport is your feet!

    Paris is a wonderful, safe place to walk around, taking in all the beautiful sights and buildings. There are so many beautiful buildings and lovely parks, cafes to stop at, crepes to be eaten that it's a shame to spend time underground.

    Bring at least a couple of pairs of comfortable walking shoes and at least one pair that has a bit of traction for rainy days, the cobblestones tend to get slick when it rains. Unless you are wearing red patent leather clown shoes, no one will notice what is one your feet. Really, no one will notice. And why should you care if they do? Having blisters and limping is enough to ruin a visit to this fabulous city.

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    London and all points north

    by sourbugger Updated May 17, 2013

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    Connection between London and Paris are superb. The Eurostar trains whisks you betwen the two cities, via the channel tunnel, in under three hours.

    Offers are often very good : either through the Eurostar website, through agents, or (if you keep a good lookout) through 'voucher' type offers in National newspapers.

    As the number of trains expands, it will be possible in time to get more direct connections, or even through trains from place like Peterborough or Doncaster. I can see Eurostar will have a ready market in those place for short-breaks in Paris, but the other way round ?

    Can you imagine the advertising "Bored of Art , culture, fine architecture, superb food and elegant fashion ?.....then find the opposite in rainy Doncaster....once visted, never remembered."

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    Up and down the river...at your conveinence

    by sourbugger Updated May 17, 2013

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    I've been looking up the website for the 'Batobus' wich plies it's trade up and down the Seine, stopping off at eight points between the Eiffel tower and the Jardin de Plantes.

    At 15 euro for a hop on-hop , hop-off service it seens to be reasonable value - certainly in comparison to the 'normal' cruise services. There are also discounts for holding SNCF/RATP tickets, although they don't say which ones.

    It's only a few euro's more to make it a 2-day of 5 day ticket.

    It appears the main downsides are a) the late start in the morning (from 10am) b) the sometimes lengthy wait between boats and c) The lack of a view where the river banks are quite high.

    Batobus - paris

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    Watch out for long interconnections

    by sourbugger Updated May 17, 2013

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    I was very nearly caught out recently by trying to use my noddle - and getting it terribly wrong.

    I took a metro with associated baggage of suitcases, child, pushchair and wife to La Chappell. The map showed it was connected to the Gare du Nord station. It was certainly connected but it was a long, long walk with innumeral gates, barriers and poor signposting to contend with.

    Eventually made it to my Eurostar train with moments to spare, sweat poring out of me and a very lively flea in my ear about my gross stupidity.

    I think there are seveal other points on the map (e.g Around Gare d'Lyon) where the map shows an interconnection - but be prepared for a bit of a hike.

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Paris Transportation

shrimp56's Profile Photo

With 2 major airports, more train stations than you can shake a timetable at, plus metro, RER, buses, Batobus, trams and tour buses Paris is a transportation- savvy city.

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