Métro, Paris

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  • Buying your Metro tickets
    Buying your Metro tickets
    by Beausoleil
  • Buy your ticket at the machine or the window
    Buy your ticket at the machine or the...
    by Beausoleil
  • Go through the turnstyle
    Go through the turnstyle
    by Beausoleil
  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Metro

    by Dabs Updated Apr 17, 2014

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Although I'm sure the buses are a much more scenic way to get around Paris, I am a big fan of the metro. The metro is Paris is quite extensive, the maps are easy to follow, and you know approximately how much time it will take to get you from one place to another. The metro runs from 5:30am to 1am (2 am on Friday, Saturday and bank holidays)

    We tend to walk a lot in Paris so metro passes usually don't make any sense for us. If you get a Mobilis, currently 6.80€ for zone 1-2, you'd have to ride 4 times or more per day to get a good value from it. It looks just like a single ticket but allows you to ride the metro, and also the RER, buses, trams, for the entire day. The Paris Visite comes out to more than 6.80€ per day, even for the 5 day pass, so I'm not sure how that ever would make sense.

    We normally buy a carnet of 10 tickets which cost less than buying 10 single tickets. You can buy one carnet to share with your traveling companion(s) as they are individual tickets. In April 2014 a carnet cost 13.70€ and individual tickets cost 1.70€. We used the metro/RER 5 times on our 1st day and 3 times on the 2nd day so sometimes a Mobilis would make sense and sometimes not. We bought our carnet at Relay, there was a slight upcharge, I think it was 14.70€. I think it was also 14.70€ had I bought it on the Eurostar.

    Individual tickets or the tickets sold in a carnet are good on all of the metro, the Montmartre funicular, the RER in zone 1, RATP buses in Paris and the suburbs (except for lines with special fares: Orlyval, Orlybus or Roissybus ), tramway lines. You can use the same ticket to make any connections that you need within 1 1/2 hours but it looks like you are restricted ie you can transfer from metro line to metro line or metro to RER or bus to bus but not metro line to bus. That part of their website is only in French but you can look at it here.

    Tickets don't expire so next time I don't use my whole carnet they'll come home with me for the next trip.

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    Métro line # 4

    by Nemorino Updated Apr 12, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    M��tro station Saint Michel
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    A a cyclist I seldom use the Métro in Paris, but recently I had occasion to take line # 4 for the first time in several years. The trains on this line now run on rubber tires, for a smoother and quieter ride, but they still have human drivers and do not (yet) have glass walls between the tracks and the platforms, as on lines 1 and 14.

    Line # 4 is the one that runs from Porte de Clignancourt in the north to Mairie de Montrouge in the south, by way of the North and East railway stations, Châtelet-Les Halles, Saint Michel, Montparnasse-Bienvenüe and Porte d’Orléans. I used to take this line sometimes when I was a student in Paris half a century ago, but now I more often use the Vélib’ bikes or the number 38 bus.

    In addition to the rubber tires, they now have very clear station announcements on the trains. The clarity is enhance by the fact that each station is named twice, first with an upward intonation on the last syllable and second with a downward intonation, indicating that the announcement in finished.

    On the new tramways the announcements are even clearer because there are two voices, first a man’s voice with an upward intonation on the last syllable and then a woman’s voice with a downward intonation, or visa versa.

    Website: http://www.ratp.fr/en/

    Related tips/reviews:
    Bus 38
    Five or six reasons not to take the Métro

    Next Paris review from March 2014: Hotel Liège-Strasbourg

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    metro fares - fares fair !

    by sourbugger Updated Mar 23, 2014

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Unlike London, Paris believes in keeping metro fares at a reasonable level for all. Visitors on short breaks (of less than a week) can’t go far wrong. A single ticket is one euro fifty cent ! small savings can be made by buying a book of 10.



    The ‘Paris visite’ card seems to be heavily promoted but at 9.30 euro it means you will need to make six journeys a day before it become worthwhile in purely travel terms. On the other hand if you can avail of one of the discounts it give to various museum / attractions (somewhat limed selection) that you are actually interested in , then it could be worth looking into.

    Rat-pee (RATP) might be the name of the metro company, but at least they are not taking the P***, unlike London Transport.

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  • Martinewezel's Profile Photo

    The Metro, of course

    by Martinewezel Updated Mar 22, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Paris

    The easiest way to visit Paris for a tourist, is to buy a "Paris Visite" card or a "Mobilis" card.
    This card permits to take any subway in Paris during 1 to 5 days.

    As we had to come from outside Paris and had to take an RER train first, we bought a one day Mobilis card, which was the most economic.
    17 euros

    Plans of the Metro are available in all the hotels and in the stations.

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  • Beausoleil's Profile Photo

    How do I figure out the Metro?

    by Beausoleil Updated Jan 20, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Abbesses Metro Entrance - MANY stairs
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    Update: January 2014
    If you don't have a Metro map current as of February or March 2013, you need to get a new map. Many of the maps in guidebooks are now incorrect because four of the Metro lines have been extended. After you read the following directions, you will know you need the name of the last station on the line to find the train. The last station has changed for four lines. You can download a new Metro map at: Paris Metro Map and click on download the guide.

    Original Tip:
    Don't be shy about using the subway (Metro) in Paris. It is incredibly easy to navigate. If I can do it; anyone can do it. They have set it up so you can go anyplace and not get lost.

    Get a free Metro map at any ticket window. They are usually sitting on a shelf and you don't even have to ask. That said, I much prefer my map booklet "Paris Pratique par Arrondissement" that has each district (arrondissement) of Paris on a separate page with the Metro stops marked. There is a full Metro map at the beginning of the book so you can put it all together. Buy at a news stand, tabac or bookstore.

    You know the Metro station where you are. You know which Metro station you want. The other information you need is the name of the station at the end of the line in the direction you want to go. Example: You are Jussieu Metro station in the Latin Quarter and you want to visit the Louvre. You look at your map and find Jussieu and notice lines #10 and #7 go through there. You want to go to the Palais Royal-Musee du Louvre stop and that is line #7 (pink on most maps). Follow line #7 to the end and you will see the last stop is La Courneuve. That is your magic key.

    Go into the Metro and follow signs pointing to La Courneuve until you get to the tracks. The rest is easy. When the train arrives, hop on and relax. The line is on a map above the doors so you can watch where you are and see where you are going. Each station is very well marked so you can tick them off in your mind. Make a note of the station right before your Louvre station and start to get ready to get off. (Pont Neuf is right before Louvre). When you see the signs for Palais Royal-Musee du Louvre, get off and follow exit signs (and all the other people) to the Louvre. You can go into the museum right from the station and skip most of the lines!

    It gets more complicated if you have to change trains, but as long as you remember to look for the last station on your line, you are okay. Change (Correspondence) example: Let's say you are at La Tour Maubourg station and you want to go to the Louvre. You will take line #8 (the only one available at Maubourg) and go in the direction of Creteil-Prefecture but will get off at the Concorde station to change trains. (That is the 2nd stop for you) You stay underground and simply follow signs to Chateau de Vincennes (line #1) to get to your next train. You will go up and down stairs and have lots of company but every time there is a turn or stair, you will see signs. Keep following Chateau de Vincennes until you come to the train tracks. Wait for your train, get on and go to the Palais Royal-Musee du Louvre stop (the stop before is Tuileries) and get off and you are at the Louvre.

    As long as you know the last station in the direction you are going, you can't get lost. If you go the wrong direction, simply get off at the next station and follow signs to that last station again and you'll be fine.

    You may want to download an Interactive Metro map at the website below. Print it out and practice a few trips before you go. You will be addicted to the fast, easy train system in Paris.

    Here is a web site for trip planning that is in English. Interactive Paris Metro Map in English They have "improved" this web site and it's only about half in English and not nearly as easy to use as it used to be. If you just keep searching on the Metro web offerings, you eventually work it out. The Metro is easy to use; the web site is not.

    Keep in mind there are often several ways to get from one place to another. You can use your Metro tickets on the Metro, RER within the Peripherique, trams, buses and the Montmartre funicular. We buy a carnet of 10 Metro tickets for 13.30 euros and share the tickets. BTW, you can buy tickets on the bus, but they cost more and you cannot use them to transfer. You also cannot buy carnets of 10 tickets on the bus. Much better to get your tickets at a local tabac, news stand or in the Metro station.

    Enjoy Paris.

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    How about that Paris Viste Pass?

    by Beausoleil Updated Jan 20, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Paris Centre

    There is some misconception about the Paris Viste Pass. It is a pass for transportation; it is not a museum pass. It will not get you past any lines in the Louvre nor get you into any museum free (unless the museum is free already). There will be a small booklet of coupons included with the pass and these offer discounts to several attractions. This varies year to year but as an example one year the discounts were as follows and they don't change much:

    20% off admission to the Arc de Triomphe, 4 euros off Espace Dali, 20% off admission to the Pantheon, 2.50 euros off admission to Musee Branly, 20% off Musée de la Armée-Hotel National des Invalides, 2 euros off the Air and Space Museum, 20% off the Pantheon, 25% off guided cruise on Bateaux Parisiens, 4 euros off Open Tour Bus, 2 euros off Fontainebleau Castle, 20% off Vincennes Castle, 20% off a one-day/two-park ticket to Disneyland Paris, 30% off France Miniature, 30% off Musee Grevin Wax Museum, 2 euros off Cite des Sciences, 4.40 euros off UNESCO World Heritage Center in Provins, 30% off the Montparnasse Tower, 10% off a purchase at Galeries Lafayette plus a shopping bag and 20 euros off Champagne Show at Paradis Latin (club).

    We aren't interested in any of the above so these discounts are meaningless to us. If they interest you, consider the Paris Viste Pass. Keep in mind that like all passes, you must buy one for each member of your party and it must be used on consecutive days. Following are the prices for the various Paris Viste options, updated January 20, 2014. You can always check prices at Paris Metro Web Site for Tourists

    Paris Viste Pass - you need a pass for each person in your group (no photo needed)
    10.85 euros for zones 1-3 for one day (age 4-10 will be half price)
    22.85 euros for zones 1-5 for one day (age 4-10 will be half price)

    17.65 euros for zones 1-3 for two days (only consecutive days)
    34.70 euros for zones 1-5 for two days (only consecutive days)

    24.10 euros for zones 1-3 for three days (only consecutive days)
    48.65 euros for zones 1-5 for three days (only consecutive days)

    34.70 euros for zones 1-3 for five days (only consecutive days)
    59.50 euros for zones 1-5 for five days (only consecutive days)

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    Metro Passes and Prices

    by Beausoleil Updated Jan 20, 2014

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    Paris Metro Entrance
    1 more image

    Newest update: Prices went up again January 1, 2014; this reflects the higher prices.

    When you want to get from one place to another quickly, the Metro can't be beat.

    We don't use any of the passes. We buy a carnet of 10 Metro tickets. (Ask for a "carnay") This is a package of 10 individual Metro tickets. It costs 13.70 euros and you can share them. If you get a pass, you each have to get your own pass and that adds up quickly. (One ticket is 1.70 euros so you save 3.30 euros with the carnet.) Kids under 4 ride free. Age 4 to 10 half price.

    PRICES: (of various Metro Passes) Updated January 20, 2014

    Paris Viste Pass - you need a pass for each person in your group (no photo needed)
    Cost is 10.85 euros for zones 1-3 (all you will probably need) for one day
    22.85 euros for zones 1-5 for one day (age 4-10 half price)

    17.65 euros for zones 1-3 for two days (only consecutive days)
    34.70 euros for zones 1-5 for two days (only consecutive days)

    24.10 euros for zones 1-3 for three days (only consecutive days)
    48.65 euros for zones 1-5 for three days (only consecutive days)

    34.70 euros for zones 1-3 for five days (only consecutive days)
    59.50 euros for zones 1-5 for five days (only consecutive days)

    Carte Orange (Carte Orange was replaced by the Navigo Pass July 2007)

    Navigo Découverte is the Navigo Pass for visitors to Paris. You start by paying 5 euros for the pass and then you can put credit on it (somewhat like the Oyster in London but not as flexible). The Navigo is either a one week or one month pass. It is bought for Monday to Sunday and cannot be purchased Friday for that week since the week is nearly over. If you have a split week in Paris, you would have to purchase two full weeks to make use of it. That's why we don't use it; we tend to fly in on Wedneday or Thursdays. You will need a passport-size photo for this pass.

    Weekly costs (Mon.-Sunday inclusive) The FIRST time you pay an additional 5 euros for the card.
    20.40 euros each for zones 1-2 (plus cost of photo)
    26.40 euros each for zones 1-3 (plus cost of photo)
    32.00 euros each for zones 1-4 (plus cost of photo)
    34.40 euros each for zones 1-5 (plus cost of photo)
    Other zone combinations are different costs, i.e. 2-3 is 19.25 euros (plus cost of photo)
    Check the RATP web site for these combinations. Not terribly useful for tourists who only need zone 1-2. Navigo Pass Official Web Site

    Monthly costs (full month only) The FIRST time you pay 5 euros for the card.
    67.10 euros each for zones 1-2 (plus cost of photo)
    86.60 euros each for zones 1-3 (plus cost of photo)
    105.40 euros each for zones 1-4 (plus cost of photo)
    113.20 euros each for zones 1-5 (plus cost of photo)

    Mobilis Pass - this is a one-day pass so you need to get a new one each day (no photo)
    If you get this pass, you need one pass for each person in your group.
    6.80 euros for zones 1-2 (probably all you will need)
    9.05 euros for zones 1-3
    11.20 euros for zones 1-4
    16.10 euros for zones 1-5

    I hope this is all correct but you may wish to check prices at Paris Metro Official Web Site
    You can search Metro routes in English. The top of the page is French but the search function is in English. Just scroll down. Paris Metro in English

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  • fairy_dust's Profile Photo

    The metro

    by fairy_dust Written Jan 8, 2014

    Paris has a metro network, and it goes all over the city. It's easy to get around by metro, though because many of the lines wind around, branch/fork out, and/or overlap, navigating the metro is a lot like a labyrinth. When I found out which station was closest to the Eiffel tower, I figured out which lines to take, but it ended up being the long way. On the way back to the hostel, I took a different route that ended up being a lot shorter.

    One of the lines goes to Paris Charles de Gaulle airport, so you don't have to pay a cab to get to/from there. I don't think the metro goes to Orly airport, though.

    You'll likely see buskers playing music (usually accordion) in the train and the music is usually good, so remember to have a little spare change handy to give them.

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  • gwened's Profile Photo

    compare paris visite and navigo

    by gwened Updated Jan 8, 2014
    metro statin Javel

    if from monday to sunday, the best deal is the navigo decouverte card weekly =semaine, otherwise the carnet of 10 tickets. Paris visite is an option to compare for prices. Versailles is a different price and yes you can buy a ticket starting in zone 3 to zone 4 single T+ ticket.otherwise its the zone 1-4 .
    zone 1 is inner Paris, then it goes out to zone 2,3, etc, zone 3 is La Defense etc, zone 4 is Versailles, here is a map in pdf file
    http://www.transilien.com/web/webdav/site/transilien/shared/documents/plans/pdf/Carte_transilien_metro_fusion.pdf

    for up to date rates see the Paris official transport site
    www.ratp.fr
    the information in English for the Paris visite is here
    http://www.ratp.fr/en/ratp/c_22088/parisvisite-presentation/

    the navigo semaine you can buy it from zones 1-2 (inner paris) 1-3, 1-4 (good for Versailles), 1-5(good for Disneyland); prices see sites for updates and they do change in January always, and July sometimes.
    You can use the Paris visite for the metro, bus, RER,SNCF trains in the region, tramways, the orlyval linking Orly airport and the funicular cable car for Montmartre. it gives other attractions discounts that you need to balance and see if ok or buy the individual tickets.you can purchase it in addition for days 1,2,3,5 days for inner Paris or the inner paris ,suburbs, and airport version. you need to write your name,and date of first use on them;

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    No mystery to the Metro

    by goodfish Updated Nov 30, 2013

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    Riding the Metro, Paris
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    Many Americans come from places without subways or light rail so the prospect of figuring out the Paris metro can be daunting. Good news, folks: it's not nearly as confusing as you may think!

    Walking the City of Light is a delight and should always be your first option but sometimes you need to get somewhere in a hurry or are just too pooped to put one foot in front of the other?Time to hop a train - and here's how you do it:

    • Pick up a free map at a metro station or find them in the back of local tourist mags. Metro stations all post maps as well.

    • On the map, locate the nearest metro station to the place you want to go, and the nearest station to where you are. Then find the colored line that indicates your most direct route between them. All metro lines are identified by color, number, and their terminus at either end.

    For instance, the day we went to Père Lachaise, the map told us that the nearest station to the cemetery was on the dark gold line: #3, Pont de Levallois/Bécon - Gallieni line. The closest station to our hotel was Opéra, which is also on that line.

    • Go to the station and buy a ticket. We found that buying a carnet (car-nay) of 10 worked best as we could purchase it at a service window versus a machine, and share the book of tickets. This is usually a much more economical option than tourist transport passes, and they never expire.

    • Now find your platform. You want to be SURE to find the one for the train heading the direction you want to go. Your correct platform will be identified by the station at the end of the line going that direction. For instance, to get to Père Lachaise we needed to travel east of Opéra on line 3. The eastern terminus of that line is Gallieni - so that's the platform we wanted. Going back Opera, we reversed it and went to the Pont de Levallois/Bécon platform - which is the terminus of the line on the west end.

    You will feed your ticket, magnetic trip down, into a turnstile before entering the platform. Be sure to retrieve it when when it spits out the other end of the machine as you need to have with you on the train.

    • When your train arrives, let everyone get off before boarding. A buzzer will indicate when the doors are about to close so if it's sounding before you've boarded, step back and wait for the next train.

    • Keep your map discretely in hand, and watch the signs at station stops along the way so you know when yours is coming up. When you get off the train, follow the "sortie" signs for the exit from the station. At large stations there will be multiple exits that emerge onto different streets.

    Your metro ticket is good for 90 minutes after validation so you can transfer trains within the Metro stations (meaning you can switch trains but can't exit the turnstiles) as many times as needed - as long as it's within that 90-minute period. And do mind your manners: talking loudly or not giving your seat up to someone who could use it more than you is considered bad form.

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    Passe Navigo Découverte - to buy or not buy???

    by pedroswift Updated Sep 6, 2013

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    In answer to the question - "We arrive in Paris on a Monday ( or tue/wed) and stay 9 days. Do I buy a Navigo Pass or not?"
    Navigo Découverte is the electronic identity pass for Paris transport Purchased from RATP / SNCF ticket windows at Metro stations and train stations for €5 fee plus a 3cm x 2.5cm facial photograph.
    The smart card can be loaded with credit for a week's use or a month. Cost depends on the number of Zones for which it is valid. The week's credit starts at midnight Sunday so by arriving mid-week one does not get "the full value"....hence the the often asked question - "Do I buy a Navigo Pass or not?"

    Doing the maths (per person) - there’s not a big difference (cost-wise) between the pass/no-pass options.
    I’d be purchasing the Navigo D (€5 to purchase the smart card lasting 10 years) especially if intending to visit Paris again within the next couple of years. I’d be loading it with Zone 1-2 weekly pass (€19.80 from Jan 2013) which would get me unlimited trips in the first 6-7 days around the city on most forms of transport except the batobus on the river. Metro/RER/Bus & funicular at Sacre Coeur are covered.

    I’d get individual tickets for the Zone 5 trips - CDG & return (€9.50 one way) & to from Versailles (Jan 2013 price €4.10) plus a carnet of 10 tickets (approx €13.30 – tickets last for ever) to cover the city during second week.(total approx €65)
    If you opted for the Zone1-5 weekly purchased at CDG for just one week (€34.40 + €5 for the smart card) you would still need a carnet for week 2 (€13.30) and a city to CDG ticket (€9.50) for a total of €62.20 (assuming you use the weekly to get to/from Versailles).
    It would be simpler to top up the weekly (ie pay for 2 weeks Zone 1-5 usage despite not using for the last half of week two). This would get you to/from CDG & cover days during week two (2x€34.40 = €68.80 + the €5 = €73.20 ) & allow other trips outside the zone 1-2 area eg Versailles.
    Not visiting Paris again? Without Nav D. €19.00 (CDG return) + €8.20 for the 2 outer zone trips to Versailles & 20 tickets( 2 car-nay) for €26,60 = total of €53.80 also no requirement for photo to go on the smart card ID & time taken to purchase.

    In a nut shell:
    2 weeks Navigo zones 1-5 = €73.20
    1 week with carnet for second week = €62.20
    No Navigo - 2x carnet + 4 trips outside zone 2 = €53.80

    Note: Advantages of the T-tickets in carnet of 10: They last forever so bring them next time you visit Paris (or give unused ones away to staff at the hotel)
    & they are transferable so a carnet can be shared with your friends or family. Using a pass requires everyone to have their own pass.

    note It pays to have some cash in Euros if you intend using ticket dispensing machines at CDG and Paris stations. Overseas credit cards more often than not don't work!!!

    http://parisbytrain.com/paris-train-metro-week-pass-navigo-decouverte/

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    LE MÉTRO DE PARIS

    by Orkaena Written Aug 10, 2013

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    Metro de Paris, Ligne 3
    1 more image

    A large and well designed metro net reaches any corner of this big metropolis. Efficient, sometimes a bit dirty cars, expensive, not as expensive as the Tube of London, but enough. However this way of transportation is recommended as faster and cheaper than others.

    Despite I never have had any problem, the concierge of my hotel recommended me that when I use the metro I must be careful with my valuable things as cameras, jewels, watches and wallet, the pickpockets are always ready for work. Nothing new, but take care.

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    Metro - Underground - Tube - Subway

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Aug 2, 2013

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    Metro Sign
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    The Métro is run by the RATP (Régie Autonome des Transports Parisiens), that also runs the RER regional trains and the Paris public buses.

    There are 15 lines, 200+ km of tracks and 390 underground stations.

    Interactive Metro station map

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  • lmkluque's Profile Photo

    Airplane, Train, Car and Le Metro

    by lmkluque Updated Jul 31, 2013

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    Handy Pocket Map at all Magazine Kiosks

    TO:I've traveled to Paris by airplane and by train and by car. It just depends on how far and from where you begin your trip to Paris.

    AROUND:

    Le Metro is the best way to reconnoiter Paris. Read in any guide book about where to buy tickets, what type to choose from and any other facts you'll want to know.

    What wasn’t written, is where to stand on the escalators going down to or up from the Metro—to make room for those in a hurry who don’t just stand there.

    The guide books don't tell you to go through the door only after retrieving the ticket!

    The first time in Le Metro—during the Transportation Strike—I got my arm caught in the door, because I rushed through. I didn't know I should retrieve the ticket before going through the doors. Thank God there were at least four inches of rubber on each side of the doors or I’d have been short an arm!

    Any newspaper stand on the street offers a Metro map, buy one, study it and be on your way.

    The Metro stops are named after the famous site or street nearest it.

    Each line is identified by the name of the last stop at each end. You should know the direction you are going by looking at the name of the last stop in that direction.

    I'd never been in a subway before and it was an adventure learning how Le Metro worked.

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    where else to buy transport tickets in Paris

    by gwened Updated Jul 28, 2013
    pont cardinet out from St Lazare you can buy tkts

    yes Relays is one, and so many other merchant sell them too, its in the Ratp site too.
    I know when visitors come time is of the essence so every little time save is precious. Locals know the ins and out, and we planned ahead. For example, I am going to Paris the 16 by TGV on business, and already have my metro tickets. Purchase them last time was in the city early in the month;so now I am prepare not to wait in lines.

    the info is in French :où acheter un titre, or where to buy a ticket
    http://www.ratp.fr/fr/ratp/c_20604/ou-acheter-un-titre-/

    prices from Paris to Disneyland change as well as to Versailles and to Orly on orlybus , and on orlyVal ,and to Roissy CDG or Roissybus ,and on RER B
    you can buy packages of one day, 2, 3,5 days for inner Paris from or including the suburbs and airports at higher prices

    YOU NEED TO CHECK THE SITE RATP AS PRICES CHANGE AT LEAST ONCE A YEAR

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