RER, Paris

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    by riorich55
  • RER
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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Billet Origine-Destination.

    by breughel Updated Mar 22, 2012

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    Billet Origine-Destination

    The former Billet Ile-de-France has been replaced at the end 2010 by a BILLET ORIGINE-DESTINATION (still valid in 2012).

    Please find here the explanation on its use which is the same as the former Billet Ile-de-France. The RATP website is not providing (2010) a translation in English of the above, they write:
    "There is no English translation for the content you're about to read.
    The content displayed below is the original document version."
    ON THEIR RENOVATED WEBSITE 2011 THEY PROVIDE A TRANSLATION.

    " Le billet Origine-Destination permet de réaliser un voyage entre 2 gares du réseau ferré d'Île-de-France : RER et trains de banlieue*. Il est utilisable dans un sens ou dans l'autre, par exemple : Paris - Antony ou Antony - Paris.
    Les billets à destination ou au départ de Paris permettent d'utiliser la correspondance métro et RER dans Paris.
    Où l’acheter ?
    Le billet Origine-Destination peut être acheté aux guichets et sur les automates, dans la gare ou la station de métro de départ ou d'arrivée.
    Les Tarifs
    Le coût de ce billet est variable selon son origine (gare de départ) et sa destination (gare d'arrivée).
    Son prix n'est pas lié aux zones, celles-ci étant réservées aux forfaits de transport."

    Here my own translation in the VT lingua franca:

    The origin-destination ticket allows for travel between two stations on the rail network in the Île-de-France RER commuter train. It is used in one way or another, for example: Paris - Antony and Antony - Paris.
    Tickets to and from Paris can be used for the Metro and RER in Paris.
    Where to buy it?
    The origin-destination tickets can be purchased at the counters and ticket machines in the railway station or subway station of departure or arrival.
    Tariffs
    The cost of the ticket varies according to its origin (departure station) and destination (destination station).
    Its price is not related to areas, these being reserved for transportation packages.

    For Paris to Versailles Rive Gauche the price increased on 1/01/2012 to 3,25 €.

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    Billet Origine-Destination former "Ile-de-France"

    by breughel Updated Mar 22, 2012

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    Billet to Versailles.

    The former Billet Ile-de-France has been replaced at the end 2010 by a BILLET ORIGINE - DESTINATION (still valid 2012).
    See my new tip.

    This is now the ticket most visitors of Versailles use as they have to travel outside Paris with the RER line C Versailles Rive Gauche.

    - The "billet Origine-Destination" enables you to travel between 2 given stations on the Ile-de-France network, either Transilien or RER. In Paris itself, a "Ticket t+" is enough.
    The "billet Origine-Destination" is also valid on the Noctilien buses. However, in this case, it needs to be bought in advance (not on sale in the bus).

    If the departure or arrival stop is in Paris, the "billet Origine-Destination" enables you to begin or end your journey at any RER or metro station in Paris.
    The "billet Origine-Destination" is valid in both directions, for example: Paris-Melun or Melun-Paris.

    The "billet ORIGINE-DESTINATION" is a ticket for occasional trips between Paris and the banlieue (like Versailles) combining Metro and RER or train. Price is calculated (by the selling desk or the machine) depending on place of departure and destination. One can use the ticket in one sense or in the other, of course for a return trip you need to buy two tickets.
    For Versailles the single fare is 3,25 € (since 1/01/2012) from the centre of Paris what includes the Metro to the RER C station and the 30 minutes trip to Versailles Rive Gauche.
    The ticket has no date for use.

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    RER Train Doors

    by bpacker Updated Oct 13, 2004

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    Press the button!

    This may seem pretty obvious but I've seen many frustrated travellers cursing colourfully on RER ( suburban trains ) when the doors don't seem to open. Actually all they need to do is to press a wee metallic button on the train door itself. Pushing it will open the heavy doors pneumatically..

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    The Fast Track through Paris

    by BeatChick Updated Apr 22, 2006

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    RER-B train to go to Paris - CDG airport
    1 more image

    One of the easiest, fastest ways to get around in Paris is the RER, the express train through Paris that also takes you to regional areas such Chartres or Chatou. If traveling solo, have one suitcase & want to save a bit of cash, the cheapest way to go is via the RER-B train from CDG. It stops conveniently at a few stops in Paris such as Gare du Nord, St-Michel-Notre-Dame, Luxembourg, Port-Royal, & Denfert-Rochereau. Because it stops at fewer stations it gets you quickly to where you need to go. I've taken the RER into Paris every trip including when I came into Paris via the Eurostar to Gare du Nord. But be careful in Gare du Nord as it's notorious for pickpockets.

    The other thing I'd caution you on is that many times the ticket machines are difficult to use; this past trip I stood in line with a long line of people as person after person got exasperated when the machine refused to accept his or her credit card. So I just went to the long lines to pick them up in person. This turned out to be a good thing as I was able to get my Metro pass, a carnet of tickets and the return fare to CDG. I believe round-trip fare from CDG to Paris centre is about 15 euro - not a bad deal at all. Remember to keep your ticket with you as you're likely to need it to exit the station. At least it's that way going into CDG. Also, there are Metro cops that may pull you aside to check if you've got your ticket with you. I'd been lucky prior to this trip in that I'd never seen them but ran into them late one night at Barbes Rochechouart stop. I flashed them my Coupon Jaune Metro pass and all was well. I asked if I could take a photo of them for you good folks here at VT to see but they politely declined.

    If you're traveling with other people and can split the cost of a taxi, then that is a much more convenient and cost-effective way to go. Also, taxis are a good idea if you're traveling with young ones or have more than one suitcase.

    Photos: February 2006

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    RER

    by CALSF Updated Sep 5, 2005

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    The RER (Reseau Express Regional) is related to the metro system, but it is not exactly the same. There are fewer stops for one thing. And the RER serves locations outside of Paris such as CDG, Orly Airport, Disney Paris, and Versailles. And there are only 5 lines.

    You can use the RER withing Paris proper. For example, we used the RER when we needed to travel from CDG Etoile in the 17th district to Gare du Nord in the 10th district in order to catch the Thalys train to Brussels. It's faster than the metro as there are fewer stops within Paris. Because of this please be sure of what your exact stop should be.

    And be aware that many RER stations do not have elevators and escalators.

    You may use your metro ticket (or the Paris Visite pass) to access the RER within Paris proper only. For destinations that are further on you will need to purchase a separate ticket for that destination.

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    RER - Regional train

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Dec 25, 2004

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    RER

    On first sight it is confusing, Paris is served by two train systems: SNCF and RER.
    RER (Réseau Express Régional) are run by the RATP (Régie Autonome des Transports Parisiens), also running the Paris Metro and Bus system.

    The RER serves the following lines:
    - The RED A-line
    - The BLUE B-line (serving the Orly-Sud & Charles de Gaulle airports)
    - The YELLOW C-line (serving Versailles & Orly)
    - The GREEN D-line

    The RER serves 245 stations.

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    Getting Up and Down with a Stroller RER/Metro

    by ChicBaby Written Feb 20, 2005

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    Small example of stairs in the Metro

    The RER can be a great way to get around Paris. With a toddler and stroller you must take be prepared for anything. Some RER stations have elevators but as we encountered on our arrival to Paris, sometimes they are out of order. In that case, you might have to carry your stroller, baby, backpack, etc. up who knows how many flights of stairs. Escalators may be working one hour, but on your return, they're out of order. You will sure to see someone lugging a suitcase on wheels up and down the stairs. I only mention this to mentally prepare you for anything. My husband and I went to Paris with the belief that we would have to carry the stroller up and down everywhere. It certainly helps if you have an extra hand. We had a system going where I would carry the stroller from the handles and my husband would carry the stroller from the front. We took turns wearing the backpack and every morning, we made sure we didn't over pack!

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    RER

    by Pieter11 Written Dec 13, 2006

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    Map of the RER-connections

    The RER stands for Réseau Express Régional, meaning Regional Express Network. It is a second network of metro-trains that works exactly the same. The RER-network, that was opened in 1969, only covers bigger distances, connecting all the suburbs around the city centre. Inside the périferique the RER-trains go underground, just like the metro, but as soon as they get outside of this ringroad, they go on above the ground. The lines are also visible on the normal metro-map, but there are separate RER-map too.

    Within the citycentre you are also allowed to use the Metro with a 1-3 zones metro-ticket. But the connections are slower and more complicated, so it is wise just to take the metro here. But if you are planning to visit Disneyland Paris or Versailles, or if you are coming from the Airports or heading there, than you need a RER-train.

    For these further trips you most of the times need a ticket that is valid for 1-5 zones. One last important thing about the RER is that it always has more possible routes. For example the RER towards Versailles is RER C. But towards the end of the line the trains choose different routes. The one going to the Chateau de Versailles is RER C5. So before you get on the train you should first look which of the connections you need. Don't only look at the letters, but also pay attention to the number behind them!

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    Return tickets

    by kari5 Written Jul 11, 2007

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    If you have a return ticket on the RER, be careful to keep your tickets separate from each other. On the face of it, the tickets are identical and you must feed a ticket through the barrier to enter the station, and feed it through again to leave the station. When leaving, it's important that you leave with the same ticket you entered with. I got stung when I'd exited with a different ticket than I'd entered with, rendering all my tickets useless for the return journey. I had to explain the situation in my broken French to the non-English speaking ticket clerk. After I'd explained myself she suddenly developed the immediate ability to tell me off at length in English, before sternly issuing me with a replacement ticket. You have been warned!

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  • Maillekeukeul's Profile Photo

    XVth - What does a RER look like ?

    by Maillekeukeul Updated Jul 16, 2005

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    The RER itself !!!

    RER is a regional train that stops by in many stations within Paris : it also rides to farther suburban cities, even some that are at a 1 hour range from Paris... There are 5 lines of RER, called A, B, C, D.... and E !!!

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    RER line A - the Red one

    by sourbugger Written May 5, 2006

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    The Paris regional Railway (RER) is a highly effective transport network that internonnects, yet runs completely seperately to the Metro system. For one thing the trains run on the opposite of the tracks to the Metro.

    Some years back it was claimed that line A was the busiest single railway line in the world. It is certainly true that it can get quite crowded, and you can be greeted by the rather surreal site of a train arriving at a station before the previous one has completely left the platform area (see the French can organise things when they want to). The Japansese however had a thing or two to say about that claim. In a country that accounts for some 40% of all the train journeys in the world they pointed out that some lines in Tokyo handled more than twice the level of passengers in a day.

    All I know is, is that that Chatelet station makes you feel very much like a rat in a very large colony burrowing underground.

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    RER

    by barryg23 Written May 20, 2006

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    The RER (Réseau Express Régional) is a train system covering Paris and its outskirts. Its stops are much more spread out than those of the metro so it can save you time if you need to get across Paris in a hurry. The RER has over 246 stops though only 33 of these are within the city boundaries. You can take the RER to places outside the city such as Versailles, Disneyland Paris and Charles De Gaulle Airport.

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    Regional Trains (RER)

    by codrutz Updated Jan 23, 2006

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    RERs are faster than the metro, the stations are four times further apart than the metro ones and also the interval between trains is longer. That's because RERs transport people into the suburbs of Paris.

    By example, you will have to take the RER to reach Chateaux de Versailles, one of the must see residence of the french leaders in Paris.

    Be careful at tickets, because most RER tickets are different from the normal "t" ticket. Check out the website for details.

    Most of the trains have two storeys, and from the top one you can see better while speeding trough Paris.

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    Regional Trains

    by Ewingjr98 Updated Sep 2, 2004

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    RER Ticket from 2000

    My second trip to Paris, I stayed at a hotel in Versailles and took the RER into Paris. The trip from the Chateau Versailles RER station to the Eiffel Tower takes about 25 minutes. Since the RER and the Metro are interconnected, you can go right where you need to in the city with a seamless transition from RER to Metro. The RER starts around 5:00 in the morning, and the last trains leave around midnight. The tickets for the RER cost just a bit more then the Metro tickets within the 7 Zones of the city (one way 2.50 Euros).

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  • Bela_LUng's Profile Photo

    Commuter trains! WOO!

    by Bela_LUng Written May 6, 2004

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    The RER trains are cool. I like them anyways. They are your typical intra-city-suburb trains. The cost of
    more then to take the metro, depending on where you are going (Gare du Nord to Charles de Gaulle was about 7 euros).

    The trains run frequently out of the many train stations (Gare) throughout Paris. I use the RER to get from the airport to Paris since it is inexpensive and the station at the airport is nearby and easy to get to.

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